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Intervention Review

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Community-based supplementary feeding for promoting the growth of young children in developing countries

  1. Yanina Sguassero1,*,
  2. Mercedes de Onis2,
  3. Guillermo Carroli1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group

Published Online: 19 OCT 2005

Assessed as up-to-date: 14 JUN 2005

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005039.pub2


How to Cite

Sguassero Y, de Onis M, Carroli G. Community-based supplementary feeding for promoting the growth of young children in developing countries. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2005, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD005039. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005039.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Centro Rosarino de Estudios Perinatales, Rosario, Argentina

  2. 2

    World Health Organisation, Department of Nutrition for Health and Development, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland

*Yanina Sguassero, Centro Rosarino de Estudios Perinatales, Pueyrredón 985, Rosario, S2000QIC, Argentina. ysguassero@crep.com.ar. crep@crep.com.ar.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 19 OCT 2005

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This is not the most recent version of the article. View current version (13 JUN 2012)

[Figure 1]
Figure 1. Eligibility of studies for inclusion in the systematic review
[Analysis 1.1]
Analysis 1.1. Comparison 1 Energy-protein supplementation vs non supplementation in stunted children after 12 months, Outcome 1 Weight (kg).
[Analysis 1.2]
Analysis 1.2. Comparison 1 Energy-protein supplementation vs non supplementation in stunted children after 12 months, Outcome 2 Length (cm).
[Analysis 1.3]
Analysis 1.3. Comparison 1 Energy-protein supplementation vs non supplementation in stunted children after 12 months, Outcome 3 Weight-for-length z-score.
[Analysis 1.4]
Analysis 1.4. Comparison 1 Energy-protein supplementation vs non supplementation in stunted children after 12 months, Outcome 4 Head circumference (cm).
[Analysis 1.5]
Analysis 1.5. Comparison 1 Energy-protein supplementation vs non supplementation in stunted children after 12 months, Outcome 5 Mid-upper-arm circumference (cm).
[Analysis 1.6]
Analysis 1.6. Comparison 1 Energy-protein supplementation vs non supplementation in stunted children after 12 months, Outcome 6 Triceps skinfold thickness (mm).
[Analysis 1.7]
Analysis 1.7. Comparison 1 Energy-protein supplementation vs non supplementation in stunted children after 12 months, Outcome 7 Subscapular skinfold thickness (mm).
[Analysis 2.1]
Analysis 2.1. Comparison 2 Energy-protein supplementation vs low-energy /low protein supplementation in poor children after 12 mo, Outcome 1 Weight (kg).
[Analysis 2.2]
Analysis 2.2. Comparison 2 Energy-protein supplementation vs low-energy /low protein supplementation in poor children after 12 mo, Outcome 2 Height/length (cm).
[Analysis 2.3]
Analysis 2.3. Comparison 2 Energy-protein supplementation vs low-energy /low protein supplementation in poor children after 12 mo, Outcome 3 Head circumference (cm).
[Analysis 2.4]
Analysis 2.4. Comparison 2 Energy-protein supplementation vs low-energy /low protein supplementation in poor children after 12 mo, Outcome 4 Arm circumference (cm).
[Analysis 3.1]
Analysis 3.1. Comparison 3 Energy-protein supplementation vs non supplementation in poor children after 3 months, Outcome 1 Weight z-scores.
[Analysis 3.2]
Analysis 3.2. Comparison 3 Energy-protein supplementation vs non supplementation in poor children after 3 months, Outcome 2 Height z-scores.