Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Training to recognise the early signs of recurrence in schizophrenia

  1. Richard Morriss1,
  2. Indira Vinjamuri2,*,
  3. Mohammad Amir Faizal3,
  4. Catherine A Bolton4,
  5. James P McCarthy5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Schizophrenia Group

Published Online: 28 FEB 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 24 SEP 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005147.pub2


How to Cite

Morriss R, Vinjamuri I, Faizal MA, Bolton CA, McCarthy JP. Training to recognise the early signs of recurrence in schizophrenia. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD005147. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005147.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Nottingham, Psychiatry, Nottingham, UK

  2. 2

    Mersey Care NHS Trust, Liverpool, UK

  3. 3

    Mersey Care NHS Trust, Psychiatry, Liverpool, UK

  4. 4

    Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK

  5. 5

    Merseycare NHS Trust, Ferndale Unit, Liverpool, UK

*Indira Vinjamuri, Mersey Care NHS Trust, Broadoak Unit, Liverpool, L14 3PJ, UK. indira.vinjamuri@merseycare.nhs.uk. vinjamuriindira@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 28 FEB 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Schizophrenia has a lifetime prevalence of less than one per cent. Studies have indicated that early symptoms that are idiosyncratic to the person with schizophrenia (early warning signs) often precede acute psychotic relapse. Early warning signs interventions propose that learning to detect and manage early warning signs of impending relapse might prevent or delay acute psychotic relapse.

Objectives

To compare the effectiveness of early warning signs interventions plus treatment as usual involving and not involving a psychological therapy on time to relapse, hospitalisation, functioning, negative and positive symptomatology.

Search methods

Search databases included the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (July 2007 and May 2012) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. References of all identified studies were reviewed for inclusion. We inspected the UK National Research Registe and contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies and authors of trials for additional information.

Selection criteria

We included all randomised clinical trials (RCTs) comparing early warning signs interventions plus treatment as usual to treatment as usual for people with schizophrenia or other non-affective psychosis

Data collection and analysis

We assessed included studies for quality and extracted data. If more than 50% of participants were lost to follow-up, the study was excluded. For binary outcomes, we calculated standard estimates of risk ratio (RR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI), for continuous outcomes, we calculated mean differences (MD) with standard errors estimated, and for time to event outcomes we calculated Cox proportional hazards ratios (HRs) and associated 95 % CI. We assessed risk of bias for included studies and assessed overall study quality using the GRADE approach.

Main results

Thirty-two RCTs and two cluster-RCTs that randomised 3554 people satisfied criteria for inclusion. Only one study examined the effects of early warning signs interventions without additional psychological interventions, and many of the outcomes for this review were not reported or poorly-reported. Significantly fewer people relapsed with early warning signs interventions than with usual care (23% versus 43%; RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.79; 15 RCTs, 1502 participants; very low quality evidence). Time to relapse did not significantly differ between intervention groups (6 RCTs, 550 participants; very low quality evidence). Risk of re-hospitalisation was significantly lower with early warning signs interventions compared to usual care (19% versus 39%; RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.66; 15 RCTS, 1457 participants; very low quality evidence). Time to re-hospitalisation did not significantly differ between intervention groups (6 RCTs; 1149 participants; very low quality evidence). Participants' satisfaction with care and economic costs were inconclusive because of a lack of evidence.

Authors' conclusions

This review indicates that early warning signs interventions may have a positive effect on the proportions of people re-hospitalised and on rates of relapse, but not on time to recurrence. However, the overall quality of the evidence was very low, indicating that we do not know if early warning signs interventions will have similar effects outside trials and that it is very likely that further research will alter these estimates. Moreover, the early warning signs interventions were used along side other psychological interventions, and we do not know if they would be effective on their own. They may be cost-effective due to reduced hospitalisation and relapse rates, but before mental health services consider routinely providing psychological interventions involving the early recognition and prompt management of early warning signs to adults with schizophrenia, further research is required to provide evidence of high or moderate quality regarding the efficacy of early warning signs interventions added to usual care without additional psychological interventions, or to clarify the kinds of additional psychological interventions that might aid its efficacy. Future RCTs should be adequately-powered, and designed to minimise the risk of bias and be transparently reported. They should also systematically evaluate resource costs and resource use, alongside efficacy outcomes and other outcomes that are important to people with serious mental illness and their carers.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Training to recognise the early signs of recurrence in schizophrenia

Many people with schizophrenia experience periods of illness followed by relatively stable periods (although symptoms of illness such as hearing voices and seeing things often remain in the background). This means that many people with schizophrenia may become unwell again and need to go back into hospital. Training in early warning signs techniques encourages people to learn, detect and recognise the early warning signs of future illness. Studies indicate that noticing even small changes in signs and symptoms of schizophrenia can often predict future illness and relapse two to 10 weeks later. Early warning training may help to prevent or delay relapse, so reducing the chances of going into hospital. Recognition of early warning signs requires detailed history taking, sometimes with additional techniques such as diary keeping, completion of questionnaires and a plan of action based on anticipated early warning signs. Training can be undertaken by the individual or be group-based, involving health professionals, family members or carers. Successful training seems to require around 12 sessions and involves therapists of high competency.

This review includes a total of 34 studies. It found that there are positive benefits of training in early warning signs. It reduces rates of relapse and re-hospitalisation (but not on time to recurrence). It should be noted that training in early warning signs was mainly used alongside other psychological therapies, so it is not entirely clear what proportion of the positive effect is due to training in early warning signs alone. Moreover, the overall quality of the evidence from these studies was judged to be very low. This means that we do not know if interventions using early warning signs, with or without additional psychological treatments, will have the same beneficial effects outside clinical trials.

Further research is required to decide whether training in early warning signs is effective on its own. Effects on quality of life, satisfaction with care, money spent, and burden of care for carers are unclear, so ideally should be known before training programmes are put into wider use. At this time, there is not enough evidence to support training in early warning signs alone.

This plain language summary was written by consumer, Ben Gray of RETHINK.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Formation pour reconnaître les premiers signes de récidive de la schizophrénie

Contexte

La schizophrénie a une prévalence inférieure à un pour cent. Des études ont indiqué que les symptômes précoces qui sont caractéristiques de la personne atteinte de schizophrénie (signes avant-coureurs) précédaient souvent une rechute psychotique aiguë. Les interventions concernant les signes avant-coureurs suggèrent que le fait d'apprendre à détecter et à gérer les signes avant-coureurs d'une rechute imminente pourrait prévenir ou retarder la rechute psychotique aiguë.

Objectifs

Comparer l'efficacité d'interventions concernant les signes avant-coureurs associées au traitement habituel impliquant et n'impliquant pas une psychothérapie en termes de délai avant rechute, d'hospitalisation, d'état fonctionnel, de symptomatologie négative et positive.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Recherches effectuées dans les bases de données incluses dans le registre d'essais cliniques du groupe Cochrane sur la schizophrénie (juillet 2007 et mai 2012) qui se base sur des recherches régulières issues de BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE et PsycINFO. Les bibliographies de toutes les études identifiées ont été examinées en vue de l'inclusion des études. Nous avons consulté le UK National Research Register et avons contacté les sociétés pharmaceutiques pertinentes et des auteurs d'essais afin d'obtenir des informations supplémentaires.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus tous les essais cliniques randomisés (ECR) comparant des interventions concernant les signes avant-coureurs associées à un traitement habituel à un traitement habituel chez les personnes atteintes de schizophrénie ou d'une autre psychose non affective.

Recueil et analyse des données

Nous avons évalué la qualité des études incluses et extrait des données. Si plus de 50 % des participants étaient perdus de vue, l'étude était exclue. Pour les résultats binaires, nous avons calculé des estimations standard du risque relatif (RR) et les intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 % correspondants, pour les résultats continus, nous avons calculé des différences moyennes (DM) avec des estimations des erreurs standard, et pour les résultats de délai jusqu'à l'événement, nous avons calculé des hazards ratios (HR) proportionnels de Cox et les IC à 95 % associés. Nous avons évalué le risque de biais pour les études incluses et avons évalué la qualité globale des études en utilisant l'approche GRADE.

Résultats principaux

Trente-deux ECR et deux ECR en grappe, dans lesquels étaient randomisées 3 554 personnes, ont répondu aux critères d'inclusion. Une seule étude a examiné les effets d'interventions concernant les signes avant-coureurs sans interventions psychologiques supplémentaires et un grand nombre des critères de jugement pour cette revue n'ont pas été rapportés ou ont été mal rapportés. Un nombre significativement inférieur de personnes ont fait une rechute avec les interventions relatives aux signes avant-coureurs par rapport aux soins habituels (23 % versus 43 % ; RR 0,53, IC à 95 % 0,36 à 0,79 ; 15 ECR, 1 502 participants ; preuves de qualité très médiocre). Le délai avant rechute n'a pas été significativement différent entre les groupes d'intervention (6 ECR, 550 participants ; preuves de qualité très médiocre). Le risque de réhospitalisation a été significativement inférieur avec des interventions concernant les signes avant-coureurs comparé aux soins habituels (19 % versus 39 % ; RR 0,48, IC à 95 % 0,35 à 0,66 ; 15 ECR, 1 457 participants ; preuves de qualité très médiocre). Le délai avant la réhospitalisation n'a pas été significativement différent entre les groupes d'intervention (6 ECR, 1 149 participants ; preuves de qualité très médiocre). La satisfaction des participants concernant les soins et les coûts économiques n'a pas été concluante en raison du manque de preuves.

Conclusions des auteurs

Cette revue indique que les interventions concernant les signes avant-coureurs peuvent avoir un effet positif sur la proportion de personnes réhospitalisées et sur les taux de rechute, mais non sur le délai avant récidive. Cependant, la qualité globale des preuves était très médiocre, ce qui indique que nous ignorons si les interventions concernant les signes avant-coureurs auront des effets semblables en dehors des essais et qu'il est très probable que des recherches supplémentaires modifient ces estimations. De plus, les interventions concernant les signes avant-coureurs ont été utilisées en association avec d'autres interventions psychologiques et nous ignorons si elles seraient efficaces seules. Elles peuvent avoir un meilleur rapport coût-efficacité en raison de taux d'hospitalisation et de rechute réduits, mais avant que les services de santé mentale n'envisagent de proposer systématiquement des interventions psychologiques impliquant la reconnaissance précoce et la prise en charge rapide des signes avant-coureurs chez l'adulte atteint de schizophrénie, des recherches supplémentaires doivent être menées pour fournir des preuves de grande qualité ou de qualité modérée concernant l'efficacité des interventions relatives aux signes avant-coureurs associées aux soins habituels sans interventions psychologiques supplémentaires ou pour déterminer les types d'interventions psychologiques supplémentaires qui pourraient améliorer leur efficacité. Les ECR à venir doivent avoir une puissance adéquate, être conçus pour minimiser le risque de biais et être rapportés de manière transparente. Ils doivent également évaluer de façon systématique les coûts en ressources et l'utilisation des ressources, ainsi que les critères d'efficacité et les autres critères de jugement qui sont importants pour les personnes atteintes d'une grave maladie mentale et leurs soignants.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Formation pour reconnaître les premiers signes de récidive de la schizophrénie

Un grand nombre de personnes atteintes de schizophrénie connaissent des périodes de maladie suivies de périodes relativement stables (bien que les symptômes de la maladie, tels que le fait d'entendre des voix et de voir des choses, restent souvent présents en arrière-plan). Cela signifie qu'un grand nombre de personnes atteintes de schizophrénie peuvent ne pas aller bien de nouveau et nécessiter un retour à l'hôpital. Les techniques de formation aux signes avant-coureurs encouragent les personnes à apprendre, à détecter et à reconnaître les signes avant-coureurs de la maladie à venir. Des études indiquent que le fait de remarquer des changements, même faibles, concernant les signes et symptômes de la schizophrénie permet souvent de prédire la maladie à venir et la rechute deux à 10 semaines plus tard. La formation aux signes avant-coureurs peut aider à prévenir ou à retarder la rechute, réduisant ainsi les risques de retour à l'hôpital. La reconnaissance des signes avant-coureurs nécessite un interrogatoire approfondi, parfois à l'aide de techniques supplémentaires, telles que le fait de tenir un journal, de remplir des questionnaires et telles qu'un plan d'action fondé sur des signes avant-coureurs prévus. La formation peut être suivie par une personne ou être collective ; elle s'adresse notamment aux professionnels de santé, aux membres de la famille ou aux soignants. La réussite d'une formation semble nécessiter la participation à environ 12 séances et l'intervention de thérapeutes d'une grande compétence.

Cette revue inclut au total 34 études. Elle a découvert qu'une formation aux signes avant-coureurs présentait des bénéfices clairs. Elle réduit le taux de rechute et de réhospitalisation (mais pas le délai avant la rechute). Il convient de remarquer que la formation aux signes avant-coureurs a principalement été utilisée en association avec d'autres psychothérapies, on ignore donc exactement la part de l'effet positif due uniquement à la formation aux signes avant-coureurs. De plus, la qualité globale des preuves issues de ces études a été évaluée comme très médiocre. Cela signifie que nous ignorons si des interventions utilisant les signes avant-coureurs, avec ou sans psychothérapies supplémentaires, auront les mêmes effets bénéfiques en dehors des essais cliniques.

Des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour déterminer si la formation aux signes avant-coureurs seule est efficace. Les effets sur la qualité de vie, la satisfaction des soins, les dépenses et la charge des soins pour les soignants sont incertains et doivent idéalement être connus avant que le recours à des programmes de formation soit étendu. A ce stade, les preuves sont insuffisantes pour soutenir le recours à la formation aux signes avant-coureurs seule.

Ce résumé en langage simplifié a été rédigé par un consommateur, Ben Gray, de RETHINK.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Ministère de la Santé. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada, ministère de la Santé du Québec, Fonds de recherche de Québec-Santé et Institut national d'excellence en santé et en services sociaux.