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Psychological interventions for needle-related procedural pain and distress in children and adolescents

  1. Lindsay S Uman1,
  2. Kathryn A Birnie2,
  3. Melanie Noel2,
  4. Jennifer A Parker2,
  5. Christine T Chambers3,*,
  6. Patrick J McGrath3,
  7. Steve R Kisely4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Group

Published Online: 10 OCT 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 2 SEP 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005179.pub3


How to Cite

Uman LS, Birnie KA, Noel M, Parker JA, Chambers CT, McGrath PJ, Kisely SR. Psychological interventions for needle-related procedural pain and distress in children and adolescents. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD005179. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005179.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    IWK Health Centre & Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

  2. 2

    IWK Health Centre, Centre for Pediatric Pain Research, Halifax, Canada

  3. 3

    Department of Pediatrics (GI Division), IWK Health Centre, Department of Psychology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Noval Scotia, Canada

  4. 4

    The University of Queensland, School of Population Health, Brisbane, Australia

*Christine T Chambers, Department of Psychology, Dalhousie University, Department of Pediatrics (GI Division), IWK Health Centre, 5850/5980 University Avenue, P.O. Box 9700, Halifax, Noval Scotia, B3K 6R8, Canada. christine.chambers@dal.ca.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 10 OCT 2013

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[Figure 1]
Figure 1. Risk of bias graph: review authors' judgments about each risk of bias item presented as percentages across all included studies.
[Figure 2]
Figure 2. Risk of bias summary: review authors' judgments about each risk of bias item for each included study.
[Analysis 1.1]
Analysis 1.1. Comparison 1 Distraction, Outcome 1 Self-reported pain.
[Analysis 1.2]
Analysis 1.2. Comparison 1 Distraction, Outcome 2 Observer-reported pain.
[Analysis 1.3]
Analysis 1.3. Comparison 1 Distraction, Outcome 3 Self-reported distress.
[Analysis 1.4]
Analysis 1.4. Comparison 1 Distraction, Outcome 4 Observer-reported distress.
[Analysis 1.5]
Analysis 1.5. Comparison 1 Distraction, Outcome 5 Behavioral measures- Pain.
[Analysis 1.6]
Analysis 1.6. Comparison 1 Distraction, Outcome 6 Behavioral measures- Distress.
[Analysis 1.7]
Analysis 1.7. Comparison 1 Distraction, Outcome 7 Physiological measure - Heart Rate.
[Analysis 1.8]
Analysis 1.8. Comparison 1 Distraction, Outcome 8 Physiological measure - Oxygen Saturation.
[Analysis 2.1]
Analysis 2.1. Comparison 2 Hypnosis, Outcome 1 Self-reported pain.
[Analysis 2.2]
Analysis 2.2. Comparison 2 Hypnosis, Outcome 2 Self-reported distress.
[Analysis 2.3]
Analysis 2.3. Comparison 2 Hypnosis, Outcome 3 Behavioral measures- Distress.
[Analysis 3.1]
Analysis 3.1. Comparison 3 Preparation and information, Outcome 1 Self-reported pain.
[Analysis 4.1]
Analysis 4.1. Comparison 4 Virtual reality, Outcome 1 Self-reported pain.
[Analysis 5.1]
Analysis 5.1. Comparison 5 CBT-combined, Outcome 1 Self-reported pain.
[Analysis 5.2]
Analysis 5.2. Comparison 5 CBT-combined, Outcome 2 Self-reported distress.
[Analysis 5.3]
Analysis 5.3. Comparison 5 CBT-combined, Outcome 3 Observer-reported distress.
[Analysis 5.4]
Analysis 5.4. Comparison 5 CBT-combined, Outcome 4 Behavioral measures- Distress.
[Analysis 6.1]
Analysis 6.1. Comparison 6 Parent coaching + child distraction, Outcome 1 Self-reported pain.
[Analysis 6.2]
Analysis 6.2. Comparison 6 Parent coaching + child distraction, Outcome 2 Observer-reported distress.
[Analysis 6.3]
Analysis 6.3. Comparison 6 Parent coaching + child distraction, Outcome 3 Behavioral measures- Distress.
[Analysis 7.1]
Analysis 7.1. Comparison 7 Suggestion, Outcome 1 Self-reported pain.