Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Therapeutic exercise for people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or motor neuron disease

  1. Vanina Dal Bello-Haas1,*,
  2. Julaine M Florence2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group

Published Online: 31 MAY 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 2 JUL 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005229.pub3


How to Cite

Dal Bello-Haas V, Florence JM. Therapeutic exercise for people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or motor neuron disease. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 5. Art. No.: CD005229. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005229.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    McMaster University, School of Rehabilitation Science, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

  2. 2

    Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, St Louis, Missouri, USA

*Vanina Dal Bello-Haas, School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, 1400 Main Street West, 403/E, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 1C7, Canada. vdalbel@mcmaster.ca.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 31 MAY 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Despite the high incidence of muscle weakness in individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or motor neuron disease (MND), the effects of exercise in this population are not well understood. This is an update of a review first published in 2008.

Objectives

To systematically review randomised and quasi-randomised studies of exercise for people with ALS or MND.

Search methods

We searched The Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register (2 July 2012), CENTRAL (2012, Issue 6 in The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (January 1966 to June 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2012), AMED (January 1985 to June 2012), CINAHL Plus (January 1938 to June 2012), LILACS (January 1982 to June 2012), Ovid HealthSTAR (January 1975 to December 2012). We also searched ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&I (2007 to 2012), inspected the reference lists of all papers selected for review and contacted authors with expertise in the field.

Selection criteria

We included randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of people with a diagnosis of definite, probable, probable with laboratory support, or possible ALS, as defined by the El Escorial criteria. We included progressive resistance or strengthening exercise, and endurance or aerobic exercise. The control condition was no exercise or standard rehabilitation management. Our primary outcome measure was improvement in functional ability, decrease in disability or reduction in rate of decline as measured by a validated outcome tool at three months. Our secondary outcome measures were improvement in psychological status or quality of life, decrease in fatigue, increase in, or reduction in rate of decline of muscle strength (strengthening or resistance studies), increase in, or reduction in rate of decline of aerobic endurance (aerobic or endurance studies) at three months and frequency of adverse effects. We did not exclude studies on the basis of measurement of outcomes.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted the data. We collected adverse event data from included trials. The review authors contacted the authors of the included studies to obtain information not available in the published articles.

Main results

We identified two randomised controlled trials that met our inclusion criteria, and we found no new trials when we updated the searches in 2012. The first, a study with overall unclear risk of bias, examined the effects of a twice-daily exercise program of moderate load endurance exercise versus "usual activities" in 25 people with ALS. The second, a study with overall low risk of bias, examined the effects of thrice weekly moderate load and moderate intensity resistance exercises compared to usual care (stretching exercises) in 27 people with ALS. After three months, when the results of the two trials were combined (43 participants), there was a significant mean improvement in the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS) measure of function in favour of the exercise groups (mean difference 3.21, 95% confidence interval 0.46 to 5.96). No statistically significant differences in quality of life, fatigue or muscle strength were found. In both trials adverse effects, investigators reported no adverse effects such as increased muscle cramping, muscle soreness or fatigue

Authors' conclusions

The included studies were too small to determine to what extent strengthening exercises for people with ALS are beneficial, or whether exercise is harmful. There is a complete lack of randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials examining aerobic exercise in this population. More research is needed.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Therapeutic exercise for people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or motor neuron disease

Muscle weakness is very common in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which is also known as motor neuron disease (MND). A weak muscle can be damaged if overworked because it is already functioning close to its maximal limits. Because of this, some experts have discouraged exercise programs for people with ALS. However, if a person with ALS is not active, deconditioning (loss of muscle performance) and weakness from lack of use occurs, on top of the deconditioning and weakness caused by the disease itself. If the reduced level of activity persists, many organ systems can be affected and a person with ALS can develop further deconditioning and muscle weakness, and muscle and joint tightness may occur leading to contractures (abnormal distortion and shortening of muscles) and pain. These all make daily activities harder to do. This review found only two randomised studies of exercise in people with ALS. The trials compared an exercise program with usual care (stretching exercises). Combining the results from the two trials (43 participants), exercise produced a greater average improvement in function (measured using an ALS-specific measurement scale) than usual care. There were no other differences between the two groups. There were no reported adverse events due to exercise. The studies were too small to determine to what extent exercise for people with ALS is beneficial or whether exercise is harmful. We found no new trials when we updated the searches in 2012. More research is needed.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

La pratique d’exercices physiques thérapeutiques chez les personnes atteintes d'une sclérose latérale amyotrophique ou maladie du motoneurone

Contexte

Malgré la forte incidence de la faiblesse musculaire chez les personnes atteintes de sclérose latérale amyotrophique (SLA) ou maladie du motoneurone (MMN), les effets de l'exercice physique dans cette population ne sont pas bien compris. Ceci est une mise à jour d'une revue publiée pour la première fois en 2008.

Objectifs

Examiner systématiquement les études randomisées et quasi-randomisées portant sur l'exercice physique pour les personnes atteintes de SLA ou MMN.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les maladies neuromusculaires (le 2 juillet 2012), CENTRAL (2012, numéro 9 dans The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (de janvier 1966 à juin 2012), EMBASE (de janvier 1980 à juin 2012), AMED (de janvier 1985 à juin 2012), CINAHL Plus (de janvier 1938 à juin 2012), LILACS (de janvier 1982 à juin 2012), Ovid HealthSTAR (de janvier 1975 à décembre 2012). Nous avons également cherché dans ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&I (2007 à 2012), inspecté les références bibliographiques de tous les articles sélectionnés pour la revue et contacté des auteurs experts dans le domaine.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés ou quasi-randomisés sur des personnes chez qui une SLA avait été diagnostiquée selon les critères El Escorial comme certaine, probable, probable étayée en laboratoire ou simplement possible. Nous avons inclus des exercices progressifs de résistance ou de renforcement, ainsi que des exercices d'endurance ou d'aérobie. Le groupe de contrôle n'effectuait aucun exercice ou bien bénéficiait de la rééducation standard. Notre principal critère de résultat était l'amélioration de la capacité fonctionnelle, la diminution de l'invalidité ou la réduction du taux de déclin, mesurées après trois mois au moyen d'outils validés. Nos critères d'évaluation secondaires étaient l'amélioration de l'état psychologique ou de la qualité de vie, la diminution de la fatigue, l'élévation ou la baisse du taux de déclin de la force musculaire (études de renforcement ou de résistance), l'élévation ou la baisse du taux de déclin de l'endurance aérobie (études d'aérobie ou d'endurance) après trois mois, ainsi que la fréquence des effets indésirables. Nous n'avons pas exclu d'études sur la base de leur mesure des résultats.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment évalué la qualité des essais et extrait les données. Nous avons recueilli les données sur les événements indésirables dans les études incluses. Les auteurs de la revue ont contacté les auteurs des études incluses afin d'obtenir des informations non disponibles dans les articles publiés.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons identifié deux essais contrôlés randomisés qui répondaient à nos critères d'inclusion, et nous n'avons pas trouvé de nouveaux essais lorsque nous avons actualisé les recherches en 2012. Le premier, une étude au risque global de biais incertain, avait examiné les effets d'un programme d'exercices d'endurance bi-quotidiens à charge modérée en comparaison avec les « activités habituelles » chez 25 personnes atteintes de SLA. Le second, une étude à faible risque global de biais, avait examiné les effets d'exercices de résistance tri-hebdomadaires, à charge modérée et d'intensité modérée, en comparaison avec les soins habituels (exercices d'étirement) chez 27 personnes atteintes de SLA. Après trois mois, lorsque les résultats des deux essais ont été combinés (43 participants), il y avait eu une amélioration moyenne significative sur l'échelle de notation fonctionnelle de la sclérose latérale amyotrophique (ALSFRS) en faveur des groupes d'exercice (différence moyenne 3,21;  intervalle de confiance à 95 % 0,46 à 5,96). Aucune différence statistiquement significative n'avait été constatée concernant la qualité de vie, la fatigue ou la force musculaire. Dans aucun des deux essais les chercheurs n'avaient fait état d'effets indésirables tels qu'une augmentation des crampes musculaires, des douleurs musculaires ou de la fatigue.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les études incluses étaient de trop petite taille pour que l'on puisse déterminer dans quelle mesure les exercices de renforcement sont bénéfiques pour les personnes atteintes de SLA ou s'ils leur sont nuisibles. Il y a un manque complet d'essais cliniques randomisés ou quasi-randomisés examinant l'exercice aérobie dans cette population. Des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

La pratique d’exercices physiques thérapeutiques chez les personnes atteintes d'une sclérose latérale amyotrophique ou maladie du motoneurone

La pratique d’exercices physiques thérapeutiques chez les personnes atteintes d'une sclérose latérale amyotrophique ou maladie du motoneurone

La faiblesse musculaire est chose courante chez les personnes atteintes de sclérose latérale amyotrophique (SLA), également appelée maladie du motoneurone (MMN). Si on lui demande trop, un muscle affaibli risque d'être endommagé car il fonctionne déjà près de ses limites maximales. Pour cette raison, certains experts n'encouragent pas les programmes d'exercice physique pour les personnes atteintes de SLA. Toutefois, si une personne atteinte de SLA n'est pas active, le muscle insuffisamment utilisé perdra en performance (déconditionnement) et s'affaiblira, au-delà du déconditionnement et de la faiblesse causés par la maladie elle-même. Si le niveau réduit d'activité persiste, de nombreux systèmes organiques du corps peuvent être affectés et une personne atteinte de SLA pourra développer un déconditionnement et une faiblesse musculaire accrus, et des crampes musculaires et articulaires risquent de se produire entraînant contractures (distorsion et raccourcissement anormaux des muscles) et douleurs. Tout cela rend les activités quotidiennes plus difficiles. Cette revue n'a trouvé que deux études randomisées portant sur les exercices physiques chez les personnes atteintes de SLA. Les essais avaient comparé un programme d'exercice avec les soins habituels (exercices d'étirement). Une fois combinés les résultats des deux essais (43 participants), il ressortait que les exercices avaient produit une plus grande amélioration moyenne de la fonction (mesurée au moyen d'une échelle de mesure spécifique à la SLA) que les soins habituels. Il n'y avait pas d'autres différences entre les deux groupes. Aucun événement indésirable imputable aux exercices n'avait été signalé. Les études étaient de trop petite taille pour que l'on puisse déterminer dans quelle mesure les exercices physiques sont bénéfiques pour les personnes atteintes de SLA ou s'ils leur sont nuisibles. Nous n'avons pas trouvé de nouveaux essais lors de la mise à jour des recherches en 2012. Des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 3rd June, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.