Intervention Review

Interventions for iatrogenic inferior alveolar and lingual nerve injury

  1. Paul Coulthard1,*,
  2. Evgeny Kushnerev1,
  3. Julian M Yates1,
  4. Tanya Walsh2,
  5. Neil Patel3,
  6. Edmund Bailey1,
  7. Tara F Renton4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Oral Health Group

Published Online: 16 APR 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 9 OCT 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005293.pub2


How to Cite

Coulthard P, Kushnerev E, Yates JM, Walsh T, Patel N, Bailey E, Renton TF. Interventions for iatrogenic inferior alveolar and lingual nerve injury. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD005293. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005293.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    School of Dentistry, The University of Manchester, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Manchester, UK

  2. 2

    School of Dentistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK

  3. 3

    University Dental Hospital of Manchester, Oral Surgery, Manchester, Greater Manchester, UK

  4. 4

    King's College London, Department of Oral Surgery, Dental Institute, London, UK

*Paul Coulthard, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, The University of Manchester, Coupland III Building, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK. paul.coulthard@manchester.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 16 APR 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Iatrogenic injury of the inferior alveolar or lingual nerve or both is a known complication of oral and maxillofacial surgery procedures. Injury to these two branches of the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve may result in altered sensation associated with the ipsilateral lower lip or tongue or both and may include anaesthesia, paraesthesia, dysaesthesia, hyperalgesia, allodynia, hypoaesthesia and hyperaesthesia. Injury to the lingual nerve may also affect taste perception on the affected side of the tongue. The vast majority (approximately 90%) of these injuries are temporary in nature and resolve within eight weeks. However, if the injury persists beyond six months it is deemed to be permanent. Surgical, medical and psychological techniques have been used as a treatment for such injuries, though at present there is no consensus on the preferred intervention, or the timing of the intervention.

Objectives

To evaluate the effects of different interventions and timings of interventions to treat iatrogenic injury of the inferior alveolar or lingual nerves.

Search methods

We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trial Register (to 9 October 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 9), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 9 October 2013) and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 9 October 2013). No language restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving interventions to treat patients with neurosensory defect of the inferior alveolar or lingual nerve or both as a sequela of iatrogenic injury.

Data collection and analysis

We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We performed data extraction and assessment of the risk of bias independently and in duplicate. We contacted authors to clarify the inclusion criteria of the studies.

Main results

Two studies assessed as at high risk of bias, reporting data from 26 analysed participants were included in this review. The age range of participants was from 17 to 55 years. Both trials investigated the effectiveness of low-level laser treatment compared to placebo laser therapy on inferior alveolar sensory deficit as a result of iatrogenic injury.

Patient-reported altered sensation was partially reported in one study and fully reported in another. Following treatment with laser therapy, there was some evidence of an improvement in the subjective assessment of neurosensory deficit in the lip and chin areas compared to placebo, though the estimates were imprecise: a difference in mean change in neurosensory deficit of the chin of 8.40 cm (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.67 to 13.13) and a difference in mean change in neurosensory deficit of the lip of 21.79 cm (95% CI 5.29 to 38.29). The overall quality of the evidence for this outcome was very low; the outcome data were fully reported in one small study of 13 patients, with differential drop-out in the control group, and patients suffered only partial loss of sensation. No studies reported on the effects of the intervention on the remaining primary outcomes of pain, difficulty eating or speaking or taste. No studies reported on quality of life or adverse events.

The overall quality of the evidence was very low as a result of limitations in the conduct and reporting of the studies, indirectness of the evidence and the imprecision of the results.

Authors' conclusions

There is clearly a need for randomised controlled clinical trials to investigate the effectiveness of surgical, medical and psychological interventions for iatrogenic inferior alveolar and lingual nerve injuries. Primary outcomes of this research should include: patient-focused morbidity measures including altered sensation and pain, pain, quantitative sensory testing and the effects of delayed treatment.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Treatments for accidental damage during surgery to the nerves supplying sensation to the tongue, lower lip and chin

Review question

The main question addressed by this review is how effective are different treatments and what are the best timings for these treatments following accidental damage during surgery to the nerves that supply sensation to the tongue, lower lip and chin.

Background

The nerves (alveolar and lingual) supplying sensation to the tongue, lower lip and chin, may be injured as a result of surgical treatments to the mouth and face, including surgery to remove lower wisdom teeth. The vast majority (90%) of these injuries are temporary and get better within eight weeks. However if they last for longer than six months they are considered to be permanent. Damage to these nerves can lead to altered sensation in the region of the lower lip and chin, or tongue or both. Furthermore, damage to the nerve supplying the tongue may lead to altered taste perception. These injuries can affect people's quality of life leading to emotional problems, problems with socialising and disabilities. Accidental injury after surgery can also give rise to legal action.

There are many interventions or treatments available, surgical and non-surgical, that may enhance recovery, including improving sensation. They can be grouped as.

1. Surgical – a variety of procedures.
2. Laser treatment – low-level laser treatment has been used to treat partial loss of sensation.
3. Medical – treatment with drugs including antiepileptics, antidepressants and painkillers.
4. Counselling – including cognitive behavioural and relaxation therapy, changing behaviour and hypnosis.

Study characteristics

The Cochrane Oral Health Group carried out this review, and the evidence is current as of 9 October 2013. There are two studies included, both published in 1996, which compared low-level laser treatment to placebo or fake treatment for partial loss of sensation following surgery to the lower jaw. There were 15 participants in one study and 16 in the other, their ages ranging from 17 to 55 years. All had suffered accidental damage to nerves of the lower jaw and tongue causing some loss of sensation following surgery.

Key results

Low-level laser therapy was the only treatment to be evaluated in the included studies and this was compared to fake or placebo laser therapy. No studies were found that evaluated other surgical, medical or counselling treatments.

There was some evidence of an improvement when participants reported whether or not sensation was better in the lip and chin areas with low-level laser therapy. This is based on the results of a single, small study, so the results should be interpreted with caution.

No studies reported on the effects of the treatment on other outcomes such as pain, difficulty eating or speaking or taste. No studies reported on quality of life or harm.

Quality of the evidence

The overall quality of the evidence is very low as a result of limitations in the conduct and reporting of the two included studies and the low number of participants, and evidence from participants with only partial sensory loss.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour les lésions iatrogéniques du nerf alvéolaire inférieur et lingual

Contexte

La lésion iatrogénique du nerf alvéolaire inférieur ou lingual ou des deux est une complication connue en chirurgie buccale et maxillo-faciale. Les lésions sur ces deux branches de la division mandibulaire du nerf trijumeau peuvent entraîner une altération des sensations au niveau de la lèvre inférieure ipsilatérale ou de la langue ou des deux et peuvent inclure une anesthésie, une paresthésie, une dysesthésie une hyperalgésie, une allodynie, une hypoesthésie et une hyperesthésie. La lésion du nerf lingual peut également nuire à la perception du goût sur le côté affecté de la langue. La grande majorité (environ 90 %) de ces blessures sont de nature temporaires et se résorbent sous huit semaines. Toutefois, si la blessure persiste au-delà de six mois, elle est considérée être permanente. Les techniques chirurgicales, médicales et psychologiques ont été utilisées comme traitement pour ces blessures, bien qu'à l'heure actuelle, il n'existe pas de consensus sur l'intervention préférée, ou sur le moment de l'intervention.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des différentes interventions et le moment des interventions pour traiter les lésions iatrogéniques du nerf alvéolaire inférieur et lingual.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données électroniques suivantes : le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire (jusqu'au 9 octobre 2013), le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (La Bibliothèque Cochrane 2013, numéro 9), MEDLINE via OVID (de 1946 au 9 octobre 2013) et EMBASE via OVID (de 1980 au 9 octobre 2013). Aucune restriction de langue ou de date de publication n'a été appliquée lors des recherches dans les bases de données électroniques.

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) portant sur des interventions pour traiter les patients souffrant de défauts neurosensoriels du nerf alvéolaire inférieur ou lingual ou les deux, suite à une séquelle des lésions iatrogéniques.

Recueil et analyse des données

Nous avons utilisé la procédure méthodologique standard prévue par la Collaboration Cochrane. Nous avons extrait les données et évalué les risques de biais de manière indépendante et en double. Nous avons contacté les auteurs afin de clarifier les critères d'inclusion des études.

Résultats Principaux

Deux études évaluées comme présentant un risque de biais élevé et rapportant des données de 26 participants, ont été incluses dans cette revue. L'âge des participants variait de 17 à 55 ans. Les deux essais examinaient l'efficacité du traitement au laser à faible intensité par rapport à un placebo concernant le déficit sensoriel du nerf alvéolaire inférieur suite à une lésion iatrogène.

Laltération des sensations était partiellement rapportée par les patients dans une étude et totalement dans une autre. Suite au traitement au laser, certaines preuves montraient une amélioration de l'évaluation subjective du déficit neurosensoriel au niveau de la lèvre et du menton par rapport à un placebo, bien que les estimations soient imprécises : une différence en termes de changement moyen du déficit neurosensoriel au niveau du menton de 8,40 cm (intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % de 3,67 à 13,13) et une différence en termes de changement moyen du déficit neurosensoriel au niveau de la lèvre de 21,79 cm (IC à 95 % de 5,29 à 38,29). La qualité globale des preuves pour ce critère de jugement était très faible; les résultats des données étaient entièrement rapportés dans une étude de petite taille portant sur 13 patients, avec divers abandons d'étude dans le groupe témoin, de plus, les patients souffraient uniquement de perte de sensation partielle. Aucune étude ne rendait compte des effets de l'intervention sur les autres critères de jugement principaux portant sur la douleur, le goût, les difficultés pour se nourrir ou délocution. Aucune étude ne rapportait sur la qualité de vie ou sur les effets délétères.

La qualité globale des preuves était très faible en raison de limitations dans la réalisation et la notification des études, de preuves indirectes et de l'imprécision des résultats.

Conclusions des auteurs

Des essais cliniques contrôlés randomisés sont clairement nécessaires pour étudier l'efficacité des interventions chirurgicales, médicales et psychologiques pour les lésions iatrogéniques du nerf alvéolaire inférieur et lingual. Les principaux critères de jugement de ces recherches devraient inclure : les mesures de morbidité axées sur le patient, y compris laltération de la sensibilité et de la douleur, la douleur, un examen sensoriel quantitatif et les effets d'un traitement différé.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour les lésions iatrogéniques du nerf alvéolaire inférieur et lingual

Traitements pour les lésions accidentelles pendant la chirurgie des nerfs assurant la sensibilité de la langue, de la lèvre inférieure et du menton

Question de la revue

La principale question examinée dans cette revue portait sur l'efficacité des différents traitements et sur les moments les plus adéquats pour effectuer ces traitements suite à des lésions accidentelles pendant une opération chirurgicale des nerfs assurant la sensibilité de la langue, de la lèvre inférieure et du menton.

Contexte

Les nerfs (alvéolaires et linguaux), assurant la sensibilité de la langue, de la lèvre inférieure et du menton, peuvent être endommagés lors de traitements chirurgicaux au niveau de la bouche et du visage, y compris lors du retrait des dents de sagesse inférieures. La grande majorité (90 %) de ces blessures sont temporaires et saméliorent sous huit semaines. Cependant, si elles durent plus longtemps que six mois, elles sont considérées être permanentes. Les lésions de ces nerfs peuvent conduire à une altération de la sensibilité au niveau de la lèvre inférieure et du menton, ou de la langue ou les deux. De plus, des lésions au niveau du nerf alimentant la langue peuvent conduire à une altération du goût. Ces lésions peuvent affecter la qualité de vie des patients, conduisant à des troubles émotionnels, sociaux et à des incapacités. Les blessures accidentelles à la suite dune chirurgie peuvent également générer des actions juridiques.

Il existe de nombreuses interventions ou traitements disponibles, chirurgicaux et non chirurgicaux, qui peuvent améliorer la récupération, y compris l'amélioration de la sensibilité. Ils peuvent être regroupés comme tels:

1. Traitement chirurgical une variété de procédures.
2. Traitement au laser le traitement au laser à faible intensité a été utilisé pour traiter la perte de sensation partielle.
3. Traitement médical traitement avec des médicaments, incluant les antiépileptiques, les antidépresseurs et les analgésiques.
4. Counseling incluant la thérapie cognitivo-comportementale et de relaxation, le changement de comportement et l'hypnose.

Les caractéristiques de l'étude

Le groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire a mené cette revue et les preuves sont à jour en date du 9 octobre 2013. Deux études incluses, toutes deux publiées en 1996, comparaient le traitement au laser à faible intensité par rapport à un placebo ou à un traitement factice pour la perte partielle de sensation après une chirurgie de la mâchoire inférieure. Il y avait 15 participants dans une étude et 16 dans l'autre, leur âge variait de 17 à 55 ans. Tous souffraient de lésions accidentelles au niveau des nerfs de la mâchoire inférieure et de la langue entraînant une perte de sensation après une chirurgie.

Résultats principaux

La thérapie au laser à faible intensité, le seul traitement à être évalué dans les études incluses, était comparée à un placebo. Nous n'avons trouvé aucune étude évaluant d'autres traitements chirurgicaux, médicaux ou de counseling.

Certaines preuves montraient une amélioration lorsque les participants rapportaient une meilleure sensibilité ou non au niveau de la langue et du menton suite à une thérapie au laser à faible intensité. Ces résultats sont basés sur une seule étude de petite taille et doivent donc être interprétés avec prudence.

Aucune étude ne rendait compte des effets du traitement sur les autres critères de jugement tels que la douleur, le goût, les difficultés pour se nourrir ou délocution. Aucune étude ne rapportait sur la qualité de vie ou sur les effets délétères.

Qualité des preuves

La qualité globale des preuves est très faible en raison de limitations dans la réalisation et la notification des deux études incluses, du faible nombre de participants et des preuves issues de participants avec seulement une perte sensorielle partielle.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 6th August, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé