Intervention Review

Interventions for primary (intrinsic) tracheomalacia in children

  1. Vikas Goyal1,*,
  2. I Brent Masters1,
  3. Anne B Chang2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Airways Group

Published Online: 17 OCT 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 8 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005304.pub3


How to Cite

Goyal V, Masters IB, Chang AB. Interventions for primary (intrinsic) tracheomalacia in children. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD005304. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005304.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    The University of Queensland, Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia

  2. 2

    Charles Darwin University, Menzies School of Health Research, Casuarina, Northern Territories, Australia

*Vikas Goyal, Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. drvikasgoyal@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 17 OCT 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Tracheomalacia, a disorder of the large airways where the trachea is deformed or malformed during respiration, is commonly seen in tertiary paediatric practice. It is associated with a wide spectrum of respiratory symptoms from life-threatening recurrent apnoea to common respiratory symptoms such as chronic cough and wheeze. Current practice following diagnosis of tracheomalacia includes medical approaches aimed at reducing associated symptoms of tracheomalacia, ventilation modalities of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP), and surgical approaches aimed at improving the calibre of the airway (airway stenting, aortopexy, tracheopexy).

Objectives

To evaluate the efficacy of medical and surgical therapies for children with intrinsic (primary) tracheomalacia.

Search methods

The Cochrane Airways Group searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cochrane Airways Group's Specialised Register, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. The Cochrane Airways Group performed the latest searches in March 2012.

Selection criteria

All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of therapies related to symptoms associated with primary or intrinsic tracheomalacia.

Data collection and analysis

Two reviewers extracted data from the included study independently and resolved disagreements by consensus.

Main results

We included one RCT that compared nebulised recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase) with placebo in 40 children with airway malacia and a respiratory tract infection. We assessed it to be a RCT with overall low risk of bias. Data analysed in this review showed that there was no significant difference between groups for the primary outcome of proportion cough-free at two weeks (odds ratio (OR) 1.38; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37 to 5.14). However, the mean change in night time cough diary scores significantly favoured the placebo group (mean difference (MD) 1.00; 95% CI 0.17 to 1.83, P = 0.02). The mean change in daytime cough diary scores from baseline was also better in the placebo group compared to those on nebulised rhDNase, but the difference between groups was not statistically significant (MD 0.70; 95% CI -0.19 to 1.59). Other outcomes (dyspnoea, and difficulty in expectorating sputum scores, and lung function tests at two weeks also favoured placebo over nebulised rhDNase but did not reach levels of significance.

Authors' conclusions

There is currently an absence of evidence to support any of the therapies currently utilised for management of intrinsic tracheomalacia. It remains inconclusive whether the use of nebulised rhDNase in children with airway malacia and a respiratory tract infection worsens recovery. It is unlikely that any RCT on surgically based management will ever be available for children with severe life-threatening illness associated with tracheomalacia. For those with less severe disease, RCTs on interventions such as antibiotics and chest physiotherapy are clearly needed. Outcomes of these RCTs should include measurements of the trachea and physiological outcomes in addition to clinical outcomes.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions for primary (intrinsic) tracheomalacia in children

The term malacia is derived from the Greek word 'malakia', meaning soft. In tracheomalacia, the walls of trachea (or windpipe) are softer than normal, which can lead to partial collapse (falling in) of the windpipe. This collapse usually happens when more air is needed, such as during exercise. The word 'primary' refers to tracheomalacia in which the windpipe itself is the cause of the disease, where as secondary tracheomalacia is compressed due to some other abnormality near to the windpipe. The most common symptom of tracheomalacia is expiratory stridor (high-pitched wheezing sound). If the symptoms are severe enough, treatment such as mechanical ventilation, tracheal stenting (mesh tube inserted into windpipe to hold it open) or surgery may be needed.

We wanted to find out which out of these possible treatments was most effective. We found only one randomised controlled trial (RCT) that assessed nebulised recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase) which helps in breaking down the mucous and has been shown to be useful in aiding airway clearance in cystic fibrosis compared to placebo (no active treatment) in children with both tracheomalacia and a concurrent respiratory infection. This trial showed no evidence of benefit in terms of the number of children who were cough-free two weeks after treatment. Also, there was less coughing reported, both during the day and at night, in the group who did not receive the intervention - however these differences were not statistically significant.

With the lack of evidence, the routine use of any therapies for intrinsic tracheomalacia cannot be recommended given the cost of nebulised rhDNase and the likely harmful effect. The decision to subject a child to any surgical or medical based therapies will have to be made on an individual basis, with careful consideration of the risk-benefit ratio for each individual situation.

It is unlikely that any RCT on surgically based management will ever be available for children with severe life-threatening illness associated with tracheomalacia. For those with less severe disease, RCTs on interventions such as antibiotics and chest physiotherapy are needed.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour une trachéomalacie primitive (intrinsèque) chez les enfants

Contexte

La trachéomalacie, une pathologie des grandes voies respiratoires caractérisée par une déformation ou une malformation de la trachée pendant la respiration, se rencontre fréquemment dans la pratique pédiatrique tertiaire. Elle est associée à un large éventail de symptômes respiratoires allant des apnées récurrentes engageant le pronostic vital aux symptômes respiratoires courants tels que la toux et la respiration sifflante chronique. La pratique courante après un diagnostic de trachéomalacie comprend des approches médicales visant à réduire les symptômes associés à la trachéomalacie, des modalités ventilatoires telles que la ventilation spontanée en pression positive continue (VS-PEP) et la ventilation en pression positive biphasique (BIPAP), ainsi que des approches chirurgicales visant à améliorer le calibre des voies respiratoires (pose de stent dans les voies respiratoires, aortopexie, tracheopexie)

Objectifs

Evaluer l'efficacité des traitements médicaux et chirurgicaux chez les enfants atteints de trachéomalacie intrinsèque (primitive).

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Le groupe Cochrane sur les voies respiratoires a effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les voies respiratoires, les bases de données MEDLINE et EMBASE. Le groupe Cochrane sur les voies respiratoires a effectué les dernières recherches en mars 2012.

Critères de sélection

Tous les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) sur les traitements liés aux symptômes associés à une trachéomalacie primitive ou intrinsèque.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont extrait de manière indépendante les données de l'étude incluse et les désaccords ont été réglés par consensus.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus un ECR qui comparait la désoxyribonucléase recombinante humaine (rhDNase) en nébulisation à un placebo chez 40 enfants présentant une malacie des voies respiratoires et une infection des voies respiratoires. Nous avons jugé qu'il s'agissait d'un ECR présentant un faible risque global de biais. Les données analysées dans cette revue ont montré qu'il n'y a pas de différence significative entre les groupes pour le critère de jugement principal à savoir proportion d’enfants sans toux à deux semaines (odds ratio (OR) : 1,38 ; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % : 0,37 à 5,14). Toutefois, la variation moyenne des scores de toux nocturne des carnets de suivi est significativement en faveur du groupe sous placebo (différence moyenne (DM) : 1,00 ; IC à 95% : 0,17 à 1,83, P = 0,02). La variation moyenne des scores de toux diurne des carnets de suivi comparativement aux valeurs initiales s’est également avérée meilleure dans le groupe sous placebo que chez les enfants sous rhDNase en nébulisation, mais la différence entre les groupes n'était pas statistiquement significative (MD : 0,70 ; IC à 95 % : -0,19 à 1,59). D'autres résultats (dyspnée, scores évaluant la difficulté d’expectoration des crachats) et les explorations fonctionnelles pulmonaires à deux semaines étaient également en faveur du placebo comparativement à la rhDNase en nébulisation sans atteindre toutefois des niveaux de signification.

Conclusions des auteurs

Actuellement, l'absence d’éléments probants ne permet pas de militer en faveur de l’un des traitements couramment utilisés pour la prise en charge d’une trachéomalacie intrinsèque. Il n’a pu être déterminé avec certitude si l’administration de rhDNase en nébulisation dans les voies respiratoires chez les enfants atteints à la fois de malacie et d’une infection des voies respiratoires favorise ou non leur rétablissement. Il est peu probable que l’on dispose un jour d’ECR sur la prise en charge chirurgicale chez des enfants souffrant de maladies sévères engageant le pronostic vital associées à une trachéomalacie. Pour ceux dont la maladie est moins sévère, des ECR sur des interventions telles l’administration d’antibiotiques et la kinésithérapie respiratoire sont incontestablement nécessaires. Les résultats de ces ECR devraient comprendre des mesures de la trachée et des résultats physiologiques en plus des résultats cliniques.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour une trachéomalacie primitive (intrinsèque) chez les enfants

Interventions pour une trachéomalacie primitive (intrinsèque) chez les enfants

Le terme « malacie » est dérivé du mot grec « malakia », qui signifie « mollesse, mou ». En cas de trachéomalacie, les parois de la trachée (conduit acheminant l’air) sont plus molles que la normale, ce qui peut entraîner un affaissement partiel (collapsus) de la trachée. Cet affaissement se produit généralement lorsqu’un apport d’air supplémentaire est nécessaire, par exemple lors de la pratique d’une activité physique. Le terme « primitive » fait référence à une trachéomalacie dans laquelle la trachée proprement dite est à l’origine de la maladie, alors qu’une trachéomalacie secondaire est une compression due à une autre anomalie à proximité de la trachée. Le symptôme le plus fréquent d’une trachéomalacie est le stridor expiratoire (bruit aigu de sifflement). Si les symptômes sont suffisamment sévères, un traitement tel qu’une ventilation mécanique, la pose d'un stent trachéal (insertion d’un ressort tubulaire maillé dans la trachée pour la maintenir ouverte) ou une intervention chirurgicale peuvent s’avérer nécessaires.

Nous avons voulu savoir lequel de ces traitements possibles était le plus efficace. Nous avons trouvé un seul essai contrôlé randomisé (ECR) ayant évalué la désoxyribonucléase recombinante humaine (rhDNase) en nébulisation qui contribue à briser le mucus et dont l'utilité en facilitant le dégagement des voies respiratoires a été démontrée dans la mucoviscidose, comparativement à un placebo (aucun traitement actif) chez les enfants atteints simultanément d’une trachéomalacie et d’une infection respiratoire. Cet essai n’apporté aucune preuve d’effet bénéfique en termes de nombre d'enfants ne présentant plus de toux après deux semaines de traitement. En outre, les cas de toux rapportés étaient moins nombreux, de jour comme de nuit, dans le groupe n’ayant pas bénéficié de l'intervention - mais ces différences n'étaient pas statistiquement significatives

Compte tenu du manque de preuves, l'utilisation systématique de tout traitement de la trachéomalacie intrinsèque ne peut être recommandée compte tenu du coût de la rhDNase en nébulisation et de la probabilité d’effet délétère. La décision de soumettre un enfant à l’un des traitements chirurgicaux ou médicaux devra être prise au cas par cas, en tenant soigneusement compte du rapport bénéfice-risque dans chaque situation particulière.

Il est peu probable que l’on dispose un jour d’ECR sur la prise en charge chirurgicale chez des enfants souffrant de maladies sévères engageant le pronostic vital associées à une trachéomalacie. Pour ceux dont la maladie est moins sévère, des ECR sur des interventions telles l’administration d’antibiotiques et la kinésithérapie respiratoire sont nécessaires.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 2nd November, 2012
Traduction financée par: Minist�re des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�