Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Enamel etching for bonding fixed orthodontic braces

  1. Haikun Hu1,
  2. Chunjie Li2,
  3. Fan Li1,
  4. Jianwei Chen1,
  5. Jianfeng Sun1,
  6. Shujuan Zou1,
  7. Andrew Sandham3,
  8. Qiang Xu3,
  9. Philip Riley4,
  10. Qingsong Ye1,3,5,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Oral Health Group

Published Online: 25 NOV 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 8 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005516.pub2


How to Cite

Hu H, Li C, Li F, Chen J, Sun J, Zou S, Sandham A, Xu Q, Riley P, Ye Q. Enamel etching for bonding fixed orthodontic braces. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD005516. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005516.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Department of Orthodontics, State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

  2. 2

    West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

  3. 3

    School of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Department of Orthodontics, Cairns, Australia

  4. 4

    The University of Manchester, Cochrane Oral Health Group, School of Dentistry, Manchester, UK

  5. 5

    Wenzhou Medical University, School of Stomatology, Wenzhou, China

*Qingsong Ye, qingsongye@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 25 NOV 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Acid etching of tooth surfaces to promote the bonding of orthodontic attachments to the enamel has been a routine procedure in orthodontic treatment since the 1960s. Various types of orthodontic etchants and etching techniques have been introduced in the past five decades. Although a large amount of information on this topic has been published, there is a significant lack of consensus regarding the clinical effects of different dental etchants and etching techniques.

Objectives

To compare the effects of different dental etchants and different etching techniques for the bonding of fixed orthodontic appliances.

Search methods

We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 8 March 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 2), MEDLINE via OVID (to 8 March 2013), EMBASE via OVID (to 8 March 2013), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (to 12 March 2011), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (to 8 March 2013) and the National Institutes of Health Clinical Trials Registry (to 8 March 2013). A handsearching group updated the handsearching of journals, carried out as part of the Cochrane Worldwide Handsearching Programme, to the most current issue. There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication.

Selection criteria

Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing different etching materials, or different etching techniques using the same etchants, for the bonding of fixed orthodontic brackets to incisors, canines and premolars in children and adults.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included studies independently and in duplicate. We resolved disagreements by discussion among the review team. We contacted the corresponding authors of the included studies to obtain additional information, if necessary.

Main results

We included 13 studies randomizing 417 participants with 7184 teeth/brackets. We assessed two studies (15%) as being at low risk of bias, 10 studies (77%) as being at high risk of bias and one study (8%) as being at unclear risk of bias.

Self etching primers (SEPs) versus conventional etchants

Eleven studies compared the effects of SEPs with conventional etchants. Only five of these studies (three of split-mouth design and two of parallel design) reported data at the participant level, with the remaining studies reporting at the tooth level, thus ignoring clustering/the paired nature of the data. A meta-analysis of these five studies, with follow-up ranging from 5 to 37 months, provided low-quality evidence that was insufficient to determine whether or not there is a difference in bond failure rate between SEPs and convention etchants (risk ratio 1.14; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.75 to 1.73; 221 participants). The uncertainty in the CI includes both no effect and appreciable benefit and harm. Subgroup analysis did not show a difference between split-mouth and parallel studies.

There were no data available to allow assessment of the outcomes: decalcification, participant satisfaction and cost-effectiveness. One study reported decalcification, but only at the tooth level.

SEPs versus SEPs

Two studies compared two different SEPs. Both studies reported bond failure rate, with one of the studies also reporting decalcification. However, as both studies reported outcomes only at the tooth level, there were no data available to evaluate the superiority of any of the SEPs over the others investigated with regards to any of the outcomes of this review.

We did not find any eligible studies evaluating different etching materials (e.g. phosphoric acid, polyacrylic acid, maleic acid), concentrations or etching times.

Authors' conclusions

We found low-quality evidence that was insufficient to conclude whether or not there is a difference in bond failure rate between SEPs and conventional etching systems when bonding fixed orthodontic appliances over a 5- to 37-month follow-up. Insufficient data were also available to allow any conclusions to be formed regarding the superiority of SEPs or conventional etching for the outcomes: decalcification, participant satisfaction and cost-effectiveness, or regarding the superiority of different etching materials, concentrations or etching times, or of any one SEP over another. Further well-designed RCTs on this topic are needed to provide more evidence in order to answer these clinical questions.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Preparing tooth surfaces in preparation for the bonding of fixed orthodontic braces

Review question

The main question addressed by this review is: what is the best method for preparing the enamel on the surface of teeth so as to improve the bonding (sticking) of fixed orthodontic braces?

Background

Many people need to wear fixed orthodontic devices, such as braces, to correct problems with the teeth and jaw (e.g. overcrowding or front teeth that stick out (protrude) or go too far backwards (retroclined)). How these braces are fixed in place will be of interest to them. In order to attach an orthodontic device, such as a brace, to a tooth, the surface of the appropriate tooth first needs to be prepared so that it can retain the glue or bonding agent used to enable the device to be attached securely. For the past 50 years, the usual way of doing this has been to etch (roughen) the surface of the tooth with acid, commonly phosphoric acid, although maleic acid or polyacrylic acid are also sometimes used. Possible harms of etching include the permanent loss of enamel (hard surface) from the surface of the tooth making it more likely for it to lose calcium or weaken during and after treatment. Recently, to reduce the length of time and complexity of the process, a technique using self etching primers (SEPs) has been developed as an alternative to conventional etchants or acids. However, whether SEPs or conventional etchants are better, and the best SEP, acid, concentration and etching time, remain to be determined.

Study characteristics

The Cochrane Oral Health Group carried out this review of existing studies, which includes evidence current up to 8 March 2013. This review includes 13 published studies in which a total of 417 children and adults randomly received different tooth preparations before fixed orthodontic braces were bonded to their teeth. Eleven of these studies compared SEPs with conventional etching, and two compared two different SEPs.

Key results

Only five of the studies provided usable evidence for this review and the combined results did not enable a conclusion to be made about whether or not there is a difference in bond failure (when the orthodontic fixings come away from the tooth) between SEPs and conventional etching. There was also no usable evidence to suggest whether SEPs or conventional etchants lead to less decay around the etching site, or are associated with fewer costs or better participant satisfaction. There was also no usable evidence to enable conclusions to be drawn about which was the best SEP, acid, concentration or etching time.

Quality of the evidence

The evidence presented is of low quality due to issues with the way in which some of the studies were conducted.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Mordançage de l’émail pour le collage d'un appareil orthodontique fixe

Contexte

L’utilisation d’acide attaquant la surface dentaire pour relier des fixations orthodontiques à l'émail a été une procédure de routine dans le traitement orthodontique depuis les années 1960. Différents types d’attaquants orthodontiques et de techniques attaquantes ont été introduits durant ces cinq dernières décennies. Bien qu’une grande quantité d'informations sur ce sujet ait été publiée, il n'existe pas de consensus significatif concernant les effets cliniques des différents attaquants dentaires et des différentes techniques attaquantes.

Objectifs

Comparer les effets des différents attaquants dentaires et des différentes techniques attaquantes pour relier des appareils orthodontiques fixes.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données électroniques suivantes : le registre des essais cliniques du groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire (jusqu' au 8 mars 2013), le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) ( La Bibliothèque Cochrane 2013, numéro 2), MEDLINE via OVID (jusqu’au 8 mars 2013), EMBASE via OVID (jusqu’au 8 mars 2013), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (jusqu' au 12 mars 2011), WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform) (jusqu’au 8 mars 2013) et National Institutes of Health Clinical Trials Registry (jusqu’au 8 mars 2013). Nous avons effectué une mise à jour de la recherche manuelle des journaux, réalisée dans le cadre du programme mondial de la recherche manuelle Cochrane, ceci jusqu’à la revue la plus récente. Aucune restriction concernant la langue ou la date de publication n’a été appliquée.

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) comparant différents matériaux attaquants, ou différentes techniques attaquantes en utilisant le même attaquant, pour relier ou fixer des bagues orthodontiques aux incisives, aux canines et aux prémolaires chez les enfants et les adultes.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais des études incluses de manière indépendante et en double. Nous avons résolu les désaccords par discussion entre l'équipe de la revue. Nous avons contacté les auteurs correspondants des études incluses afin d'obtenir des informations supplémentaires, si nécessaire.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 13 études randomisant 417 participants avec 7 184 dents/bagues. Nous avons évalué deux études (15%) comme étant à faible risque de biais, 10 études (77%) comme étant à risque de biais élevé et une étude (8%) comme étant à risque de biais incertain.

Les adhésifs automordançants par rapport aux réactifs d’attaque conventionnels

Onze études ont comparé les effets des adhésifs automordançants par rapport aux réactifs d’attaque conventionnels. Seuls cinq de ces études (trois de conception en bouche fractionnée et deux de conception parallèle) ont fourni des données au niveau des participants, avec les autres études rapportant au niveau de la dent, les données n’ont donc pas été regroupées. Une méta-analyse de ces cinq études, avec un suivi allant de 5 à 37 mois, ont fourni des preuves de très faible qualité qui étaient insuffisantes pour déterminer si une différence existe ou non en termes de taux d'échec entre les adhésifs automordançants et les réactifs d’attaque conventionnels (risque relatif 1,14; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% de 0,75 à 1,73; 221 participants). L'incertitude dans l’IC inclut à la fois l'absence d'effet et les effets bénéfiques et délétères. L'analyse en sous-groupe n'a pas montré de différence entre les études en bouche fractionnée et les études parallèles.

Il n'y avait aucune donnée disponible pour permettre une évaluation des critères de jugement suivants : la décalcification, la satisfaction des participants et le rapport coût-efficacité. Une étude a rapporté la décalcification, mais seulement au niveau de la dent.

Comparaison des divers adhésifs automordançants

Deux études ont comparé deux adhésifs automordançants différents. Les deux études ont rapporté des taux d'échec de collage et une étude a également rapporté une décalcification. Cependant, comme les deux études rapportaient des critères de jugement uniquement au niveau de la dent, il n'y avait pas de données disponibles pour comparer les critères de jugement sur les adhésifs automordançants par rapport aux autres techniques étudiées.

Nous n’avons trouvé aucune étude éligible évaluant différents matériaux attaquants (par exemple, l’acide phosphorique, l’acide polyacrylique, l’acide maléique), les concentrations ou la durée des attaquants.

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous avons trouvé des preuves de qualité médiocre qui étaient insuffisantes pour déterminer s’il existe ou non une différence en termes de taux d'échec entre les adhésifs automordançants et les systèmes classiques attaquants lors de collage d’appareils orthodontiques fixes pendant un suivi de 5 à 37 mois. Les données disponibles étaient également insuffisantes pour émettre des conclusions concernant la supériorité des adhésifs automordançants ou des attaquants conventionnel pour les critères de jugement suivants : la décalcification, la satisfaction des participants et le rapport coût-efficacité, ou concernant la supériorité de différents matériaux attaquants, la durée des attaquants ou l’intensité ou d'un quelconque adhésif automordançant par rapport à un autre. D’autres ECR sur ce sujet et bien conçus sont nécessaires pour fournir des preuves supplémentaires afin de répondre à ces questions cliniques.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Mordançage de l’émail pour le collage d'un appareil orthodontique fixe

La préparation de la surface dentaire pour relier les appareils orthodontiques fixes

Question de la revue

La principale question examinée dans cette revue est : Quelle est la meilleure méthode pour la préparation de l'émail sur la surface des dents afin d'améliorer la liaison (collage) d'un appareil orthodontique fixe?

Contexte

Beaucoup de personnes ont besoin de porter des appareils orthodontiques fixes, tels que des bagues, pour corriger des problèmes avec les dents et la mâchoire (par exemple, la surpopulation ou des dents avancées ou trop en arrière (retroversées)). Savoir comment les bagues sont fixées pourrait les intéresser. Afin de fixer un appareil orthodontique, tel que des bagues, la surface de la dent appropriée doit d’abord être préparée pour qu'elle puisse maintenir la colle ou le lien utilisé pour permettre au dispositif d’être fermement raccordé. Durant ces 50 dernières années, la pratique habituelle était de rendre la surface de la dent rugueuse avec un acide, le plus courant est l’acide phosphorique, bien que l'acide maléique ou l’acide polyacrylique soient parfois utilisés. D’éventuels effets délétères de cette pratique comprennent la perte permanente de l’émail (surface dure) de la surface de la dent, favorisant la perte de calcium ou un calcium atténué pendant et après le traitement. Récemment, pour réduire la durée et la complexité du processus, une technique utilisant des adhésifs automordançants a été développée comme alternative aux acides ou aux réactifs d’attaque. Cependant, il reste à déterminer si les adhésifs automordançants sont plus efficaces que les réactifs d’attaque conventionnels, le meilleur adhésif automordançant, l’acide, la concentration et la durée des réactifs d’attaque.

Les caractéristiques de l'étude

Le groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire a mené cette revue des études existantes, qui comprend des preuves à jour jusqu'au 8 mars 2013. Cette revue comprend 13 études publiées, dans lesquels un total de 417 enfants et adultes avaient reçu différentes préparations de dents avant la pose d'un appareil orthodontique fixe. Onze de ces études comparaient les adhésifs automordançants conventionnels aux réactifs d’attaque conventionnels et deux comparaient deux adhésifs automordançants différents.

Résultats principaux

Seules cinq études ont fourni des données utilisables pour cette revue et les résultats combinés n'ont pas permis d’émettre une conclusion quant à l’existence ou non d’une différence en termes d'échec de collage (lorsque l’appareil orthodontique fixe se détache de la dent) entre les adhésifs automordançants et les réactifs d’attaque conventionnels. Il n'y avait également aucune preuve permettant d'indiquer si les adhésifs automordançants ou les réactifs d’attaque conduisaient à une baisse du nombre de caries autour de l’endroit rugueux, ou s’ils sont associés à des coûts moins élevés ou à une meilleure satisfaction des participants. Il n'y avait également aucune preuve pour permettre d’émettre des conclusions concernant le meilleur adhésif automordançant, le meilleur acide, la meilleure concentration ou le meilleur temps d’attaque.

Qualité des preuves

Les preuves présentées sont de faible qualité en raison de problèmes liés à la manière dont certaines études ont été réalisées.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Minist�re Fran�ais des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�, Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux