Intervention Review

Rehabilitation for ankle fractures in adults

  1. Chung-Wei Christine Lin1,*,
  2. Nicole AJ Donkers2,
  3. Kathryn M Refshauge3,
  4. Paula R Beckenkamp1,
  5. Kriti Khera1,
  6. Anne M Moseley1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group

Published Online: 14 NOV 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 5 OCT 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005595.pub3

How to Cite

Lin CWC, Donkers NAJ, Refshauge KM, Beckenkamp PR, Khera K, Moseley AM. Rehabilitation for ankle fractures in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD005595. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005595.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Musculoskeletal Division, The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

  2. 2

    Maastricht University, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht, Limburg, Netherlands

  3. 3

    University of Sydney, Discipline of Physiotherapy, Lidcombe, New South Wales, Australia

*Chung-Wei Christine Lin, Musculoskeletal Division, The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, PO Box M201, Missenden Road, Sydney, New South Wales, 2050, Australia. clin@georgeinstitute.org.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 14 NOV 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Rehabilitation after ankle fracture can begin soon after the fracture has been treated, either surgically or non-surgically, by the use of different types of immobilisation that allow early commencement of weight-bearing or exercise. Alternatively, rehabilitation, including the use of physical or manual therapies, may start following the period of immobilisation. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2008.

Objectives

To assess the effects of rehabilitation interventions following conservative or surgical treatment of ankle fractures in adults.

Search methods

We searched the Specialised Registers of the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group and the Cochrane Rehabilitation and Related Therapies Field, CENTRAL via The Cochrane Library (2011 Issue 7), MEDLINE via PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PEDro, AMED, SPORTDiscus and clinical trials registers up to July 2011. In addition, we searched reference lists of included studies and relevant systematic reviews.

Selection criteria

Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials with adults undergoing any interventions for rehabilitation after ankle fracture were considered. The primary outcome was activity limitation. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, patient satisfaction, impairments and adverse events.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently screened search results, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. Risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for dichotomous variables, and mean differences or standardised mean differences and 95% CIs were calculated for continuous variables. End of treatment and end of follow-up data were presented separately. For end of follow-up data, short term follow-up was defined as up to three months after randomisation, and long-term follow-up as greater than six months after randomisation. Meta-analysis was performed where appropriate.

Main results

Thirty-eight studies with a total of 1896 participants were included. Only one study was judged at low risk of bias. Eight studies were judged at high risk of selection bias because of lack of allocation concealment and over half the of the studies were at high risk of selective reporting bias.

Three small studies investigated rehabilitation interventions during the immobilisation period after conservative orthopaedic management. There was limited evidence from two studies (106 participants in total) of short-term benefit of using an air-stirrup versus an orthosis or a walking cast. One study (12 participants) found 12 weeks of hypnosis did not reduce activity or improve other outcomes.

Thirty studies investigated rehabilitation interventions during the immobilisation period after surgical fixation. In 10 studies, the use of a removable type of immobilisation combined with exercise was compared with cast immobilisation alone. Using a removable type of immobilisation to enable controlled exercise significantly reduced activity limitation in five of the eight studies reporting this outcome, reduced pain (number of participants with pain at the long term follow-up: 10/35 versus 25/34; risk ratio (RR) 0.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.22 to 0.68; 2 studies) and improved ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. However, it also led to a higher rate of mainly minor adverse events (49/201 versus 20/197; RR 2.30, 95% CI 1.49 to 3.56; 7 studies).

During the immobilisation period after surgical fixation, commencing weight-bearing made a small improvement in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (mean difference in the difference in range of motion compared with the non-fractured side at the long term follow-up 6.17%, 95% CI 0.14 to 12.20; 2 studies). Evidence from one small but potentially biased study (60 participants) showed that neurostimulation, an electrotherapy modality, may be beneficial in the short-term. There was little and inconclusive evidence on what type of support or immobilisation was the best. One study found no immobilisation improved ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion range of motion compared with cast immobilisation, but another showed using a backslab improved ankle dorsiflexion range of motion compared with using a bandage.

Five studies investigated different rehabilitation interventions following the immobilisation period after either conservative or surgical orthopaedic management. There was no evidence of effect for stretching or manual therapy in addition to exercise, or exercise compared with usual care. One small study (14 participants) at a high risk of bias found reduced ankle swelling after non-thermal compared with thermal pulsed shortwave diathermy.

Authors' conclusions

There is limited evidence supporting early commencement of weight-bearing and the use of a removable type of immobilisation to allow exercise during the immobilisation period after surgical fixation. Because of the potential increased risk of adverse events, the patient's ability to comply with the use of a removable type of immobilisation to enable controlled exercise is essential. There is little evidence for rehabilitation interventions during the immobilisation period after conservative orthopaedic management and no evidence for stretching, manual therapy or exercise compared to usual care following the immobilisation period. Small, single studies showed that some electrotherapy modalities may be beneficial. More clinical trials that are well-designed and adequately-powered are required to strengthen current evidence.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Rehabilitation for ankle fractures in adults

Ankle fracture is one of the most common fractures of the lower limb, especially in older women and young men. It is generally treated surgically or non-surgically, followed by a period of immobilisation to prevent complications such as malunion. Because of the fracture and the subsequent immobilisation period, people often experience pain, stiffness, weakness and swelling at the ankle, and a reduced ability to participate in activities. This review looked at the evidence on the effects of different rehabilitation interventions for these fractures.

Rehabilitation for ankle fracture can begin soon after the fracture has been treated, either surgically or non-surgically, by the use of different types of immobilisation that allow early commencement of weight-bearing or exercise. Alternatively, rehabilitation, including the use of physical or manual therapies, may start following the period of immobilisation.

Thirty-eight studies with a total of 1,896 participants were included in the review. Many of the trials were potentially biased.

Three studies examined rehabilitation interventions that started during the immobilisation period after non-surgical treatment. There is some very limited evidence of short term benefit of one type of brace compared with immobilisation with a cast or orthosis. There was no evidence for hypnosis.

Thirty studies investigated rehabilitation interventions that started during the immobilisation period after surgical treatment. Ten of these compared the use of a removable type of immobilisation combined with exercise with cast immobilisation alone. There is some evidence from these that using a removable brace or splint so that gentle ankle exercises can be performed during the immobilisation period may enhance the return to normal activities, reduce pain and improve ankle movement. However, the incidence of adverse events (such as problems with the surgical wound) may also be increased. Starting walking early may also slightly improve ankle movement. One small and biased study showed that neurostimulation, an electrotherapy modality, may be beneficial in the short-term. There was little and inconclusive evidence on what type of support or immobilisation was the best.

Five studies investigated different rehabilitation interventions that started after the immobilisation period. There is no evidence of improved function for stretching or manual therapy when either of these are added to an exercise programme, or for an exercise programme when this is compared with usual care. One small and potentially biased study found reduced ankle swelling after non-thermal compared with thermal pulsed shortwave diathermy.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Rééducation après fracture de la cheville chez l'adulte

Contexte

La rééducation après fracture de la cheville peut commencer dès que la fracture a été traitée, que ce soit chirurgicalement ou non chirurgicalement, à l'aide de différents types d'immobilisation permettant de commencer rapidement à faire porter du poids ou à s'exercer. Alternativement, la rééducation, notamment la kinésithérapie ou la thérapie manuelle, pourra commencer après la période d'immobilisation. Ceci est une mise à jour d’une revue Cochrane publiée pour la première fois en 2008.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des interventions de rééducation après traitement conservateur ou chirurgical de la fracture de la cheville chez l'adulte.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les registres spécialisés du groupe Cochrane sur les traumatismes ostéo-articulaires et musculaires et du groupe Cochrane sur la médecine physique et de réadaptation, ainsi que dans CENTRAL via The Cochrane Library (2011 numéro 7), MEDLINE via PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PEDro, AMED, SPORTDiscus et des registres d'essais cliniques jusqu'à juillet 2011. Nous avons en outre passé au crible les références bibliographiques des études incluses et des revues systématiques pertinentes.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons considéré l'inclusion de tout essai contrôlé randomisé ou quasi-randomisé portant sur des adultes effectuant une forme quelconque de rééducation suite à une fracture de la cheville. Le critère de jugement principal était la limitation d'activité. Les critères secondaires étaient notamment la qualité de vie, la satisfaction des patients, les handicaps et les événements indésirables.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont, de manière indépendante, passé au crible les résultats de recherche, évalué les risques de biais et extrait des données. Nous avons calculé le risque relatif avec intervalle de confiance à 95 % (IC à 95%) pour les variables dichotomiques, et la différence moyenne ou la différence moyenne standardisée avec IC à 95% pour les variables continues. Les données relatives à la fin du traitement et à la fin du suivi ont été présentées séparément. Pour les données relatives à la fin du suivi, le suivi à court terme a été défini comme pouvant aller jusqu'à trois mois après la randomisation, et le suivi à long terme comme se prolongeant au-delà de six mois après la randomisation. Des méta-analyses ont été réalisées lorsque cela était pertinent.

Résultats Principaux

Trente-huit études totalisant 1896 participants ont été incluses. Une seule étude a été jugée à faible risque de biais. Huit études ont été jugées à haut risque de biais de sélection par manque d'assignation secrète et plus de la moitié des études étaient à haut risque de biais de notification sélective.

Trois petites études avaient porté sur des interventions de rééducation durant la période d'immobilisation après traitement orthopédique conservateur. Deux études (106 participants au total) ont fourni des preuves limitées d'un bénéfice à court terme conféré par l'utilisation d'un étrier à air plutôt que d'une gouttière ou d'un plâtre de marche. Une étude (12 participants) avait constaté que 12 semaines d'hypnose n'avaient pas réduit l'activité ni amélioré d'autres critères de résultat.

Trente études avaient examiné des interventions de rééducation durant la période d'immobilisation faisant suite à un traitement chirurgical. Dans 10 études l'utilisation d'une forme amovible d'immobilisation combinée à de l'exercice avait été comparée à la seule immobilisation plâtrée. L'utilisation d'une forme amovible d'immobilisation pour permettre un exercice contrôlé avait significativement réduit la limitation d'activité dans cinq des huit études ayant rendu compte de ce critère de résultat, avait réduit la douleur (nombre de participants souffrant de douleurs dans le suivi à long terme : 10 / 35 versus 25 / 34 ; risque relatif (RR) 0,39, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% de 0,22 à 0,68 ; 2 études ) et avait amélioré l'amplitude de dorsiflexion de la cheville. Elle avait cependant aussi conduit à un taux plus élevé d'effets indésirables, essentiellement mineurs (49 / 201 versus 20 / 197 ; RR 2,30 ; IC à 95% 1,49 à 3,56 ; 7 études).

Au cours de la période d'immobilisation après fixation chirurgicale, commencer à faire peser du poids avait légèrement amélioré l'amplitude de dorsiflexion de la cheville (différence moyenne de la différence d'amplitude de mouvement par rapport au côté sans fracture dans un suivi à long terme 6,17 % ; IC à 95% 0,14 à 12,20 ; 2 études). Les données d'une petite étude potentiellement biaisée (60 participants) montraient que la neurostimulation, une forme d'électrothérapie, pourrait être bénéfique à court terme. Il n'y avait guère de données concluantes sur ​​ce qui serait le meilleur type de support ou d'immobilisation. Une étude avait constaté qu'aucune immobilisation n'avait amélioré les amplitudes de dorsiflexion de la cheville et de flexion plantaire mieux que l'immobilisation plâtrée, mais une autre avait montré que l'utilisation d'un backslab améliorait l'amplitude de dorsiflexion de la cheville par rapport à l'utilisation d'un bandage.

Cinq études avaient porté sur différentes interventions de rééducation suivant la période d'immobilisation après traitement orthopédique conservateur ou bien chirurgical. Il n'y avait pas de preuve d'un quelconque effet de l'ajout de l'étirement ou de la thérapie manuelle à l'exercice, ni de l'exercice lui-même en comparaison avec les soins habituels. Une petite étude (14 participants) à risque élevé de biais avait constaté une réduction de l'enflure de la cheville quand la diathermie à ondes courtes pulsées était effectuée de manière non-thermique plutôt que thermique.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il y a des preuves limitées qu'il y a avantage, d'une part, à commencer rapidement à faire peser du poids et, d'autre part, à utiliser une forme amovible d'immobilisation pour permettre de l'exercice pendant la période d'immobilisation après fixation chirurgicale. La capacité du patient à se conformer à l'utilisation d'une forme amovible d'immobilisation pour permettre un exercice contrôlé est essentielle en raison du possible risque accru d'événements indésirables. Il y a quelques résultats en faveur des interventions de rééducation durant la période d'immobilisation après traitement orthopédique conservateur mais rien concernant l'étirement, la thérapie manuelle ou l'exercice en comparaison avec les soins habituels après la période d'immobilisation. De petites études isolées ont montré que certaines modalités d'électrothérapie pouvaient être bénéfiques. Des essais cliniques supplémentaires, bien conçus et de puissance suffisante, seront nécessaires pour consolider les résultats actuels.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Rééducation après fracture de la cheville chez l'adulte

Rééducation après fracture de la cheville chez l'adulte

La fracture de la cheville est une des fractures des membres inférieurs les plus courantes, en particulier chez les femmes âgées et les hommes jeunes. Un traitement chirurgical ou non chirurgical est généralement suivi d'une période d'immobilisation pour prévenir les complications telles que les cals vicieux. En raison de la fracture et la période d'immobilisation qui lui fait suite, les gens éprouvent souvent des douleurs, de la raideur, de la faiblesse et une enflure à la cheville, ainsi qu'une diminution des capacités d'activités. Cette revue a examiné les données sur les effets de différentes interventions de rééducation pour ces fractures.

La rééducation après fracture de la cheville peut commencer dès que la fracture a été traitée, que ce soit chirurgicalement ou non chirurgicalement, à l'aide de différents types d'immobilisation permettant de commencer rapidement à faire peser du poids ou à s'exercer. Alternativement, la rééducation, notamment la kinésithérapie ou la thérapie manuelle, pourra commencer après la période d'immobilisation.

Trente-huit études totalisant 1 896 participants ont été incluses dans cette revue. Nombre de ces essais étaient potentiellement biaisés.

Trois études avaient examiné des interventions de rééducation commençant pendant la période d'immobilisation suivant un traitement non chirurgical. Il existe quelques preuves très limitées du bénéfice à court terme d'un certain type d'attelle, en comparaison avec l'immobilisation à l'aide d'un plâtre ou d'une gouttière. Il n'y avait pas de données probantes concernant l'hypnose.

Trente études avaient examiné des interventions de rééducation commençant pendant la période d'immobilisation suivant un traitement chirurgical. Dix d'entre elles avaient comparé l'utilisation d'une forme amovible d'immobilisation combinée à de l'exercice avec la seule immobilisation par plâtre. Il semble en ressortir que l'utilisation d'une attelle amovible permettant d'effectuer de légers exercices de la cheville pendant la période d'immobilisation peut faciliter le retour aux activités normales, réduire la douleur et améliorer les mouvements de la cheville. Cependant, l'incidence des effets indésirables (tels que des problèmes de plaie chirurgicale) pourrait également en être augmentée. Recommencer rapidement à marcher pourrait également améliorer légèrement les mouvements de la cheville. Une petite étude biaisée montrait que la neurostimulation, une forme d'électrothérapie, pourrait être bénéfique à court terme. Il n'y avait guère de données concluantes sur ​​ce qui serait le meilleur type de support ou d'immobilisation.

Cinq études avaient examiné différentes interventions de rééducation commençant après la période d'immobilisation. Il n'existe aucune preuve d'amélioration de la fonction lorsque l'étirement ou la thérapie manuelle sont ajoutés à un programme d'exercice, ou lorsqu'un programme d'exercices est comparé aux soins habituels. Une petite étude potentiellement biaisée avait constaté une réduction de l'enflure de la cheville quand la diathermie à ondes courtes pulsées était effectuée de manière non-thermique plutôt que thermique.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 11th October, 2013
Traduction financée par: Minist�re des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�