Intervention Review

Pharmacological interventions for borderline personality disorder

  1. Jutta Stoffers2,
  2. Birgit A Völlm3,
  3. Gerta Rücker4,
  4. Antje Timmer5,
  5. Nick Huband3,
  6. Klaus Lieb1,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group

Published Online: 16 JUN 2010

Assessed as up-to-date: 24 JAN 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005653.pub2

How to Cite

Stoffers J, Völlm BA, Rücker G, Timmer A, Huband N, Lieb K. Pharmacological interventions for borderline personality disorder. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2010, Issue 6. Art. No.: CD005653. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005653.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University Medical Center Mainz, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Mainz, Germany

  2. 2

    & Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Freiburg, Mainz, Germany

  3. 3

    Institute of Mental Health, Section of Forensic Mental Health, Nottingham, UK

  4. 4

    Department of Medical Biometry and Statistics, German Cochrane Centre, Freiburg, Germany

  5. 5

    Helmholtz Zentrum München Research Center for Health and Environment, Institute of Epidemiology, München, Germany

*Klaus Lieb, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Mainz, Untere Zahlbacherstr 8, Mainz, D-55131, Germany. klaus.lieb@ukmainz.de.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 16 JUN 2010

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Drugs are widely used in borderline personality disorder (BPD) treatment, chosen because of properties known from other psychiatric disorders ("off-label use"), mostly targeting affective or impulsive symptom clusters.

Objectives

To assess the effects of drug treatment in BPD patients.

Search methods

We searched bibliographic databases according to the Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group strategy up to September 2009, reference lists of articles, and contacted researchers in the field.

Selection criteria

Randomised studies comparing drug versus placebo, or drug versus drug(s) in BPD patients. Outcomes included total BPD severity, distinct BPD symptom facets according to DSM-IV criteria, associated psychopathology not specific to BPD, attrition and adverse effects.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors selected trials, assessed quality and extracted data, independently.

Main results

Twenty-eight trials involving a total of 1742 trial participants were included. First-generation antipsychotics (flupenthixol decanoate, haloperidol, thiothixene); second-generation antipsychotics (aripirazole, olanzapine, ziprasidone), mood stabilisers (carbamazepine, valproate semisodium, lamotrigine, topiramate), antidepressants (amitriptyline, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, phenelzine sulfate, mianserin), and dietary supplementation (omega-3 fatty acid) were tested. First-generation antipsychotics were subject to older trials, whereas recent studies focussed on second-generation antipsychotics and mood stabilisers. Data were sparse for individual comparisons, indicating marginal effects for first-generation antipsychotics and antidepressants.

The findings were suggestive in supporting the use of second-generation antipsychotics, mood stabilisers, and omega-3 fatty acids, but require replication, since most effect estimates were based on single studies. The long-term use of these drugs has not been assessed.

Adverse event data were scarce, except for olanzapine. There was a possible increase in self-harming behaviour, significant weight gain, sedation and changes in haemogram parameters with olanzapine. A significant decrease in body weight was observed with topiramate treatment. All drugs were well tolerated in terms of attrition.

Direct drug comparisons comprised two first-generation antipsychotics (loxapine versus chlorpromazine), first-generation antipsychotic against antidepressant (haloperidol versus amitriptyline; haloperidol versus phenelzine sulfate), and second-generation antipsychotic against antidepressant (olanzapine versus fluoxetine). Data indicated better outcomes for phenelzine sulfate but no significant differences in the other comparisons, except olanzapine which showed more weight gain and sedation than fluoxetine. The only trial testing single versus combined drug treatment (olanzapine versus olanzapine plus fluoxetine; fluoxetine versus fluoxetine plus olanzapine) yielded no significant differences in outcomes.

Authors' conclusions

The available evidence indicates some beneficial effects with second-generation antipsychotics, mood stabilisers, and dietary supplementation by omega-3 fatty acids. However, these are mostly based on single study effect estimates. Antidepressants are not widely supported for BPD treatment, but may be helpful in the presence of comorbid conditions. Total BPD severity was not significantly influenced by any drug. No promising results are available for the core BPD symptoms of chronic feelings of emptiness, identity disturbance and abandonment. Conclusions have to be drawn carefully in the light of several limitations of the RCT evidence that constrain applicability to everyday clinical settings (among others, patients' characteristics and duration of interventions and observation periods).

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Drug treatment for borderline personality disorder

Many people with borderline personality disorder (BPD) receive medical treatment. However, there are no drugs available for BPD treatment specifically. A certain drug is most often chosen because of its known properties in the treatment of associated disorders, or BPD symptoms that are also known to be present in other conditions, such as depressive, psychotic, or anxious disorders. BPD itself is characterised by a pervasive pattern of instability in affect regulation (with symptoms such as inappropriate anger, chronic feelings of emptiness, and affective instability), impulse control (symptoms: self-mutilating or suicidal behaviour, ideation, or suicidal threats to others), interpersonal problems (symptoms: frantic efforts to avoid abandonment, patterns of unstable relationships with idealization and depreciation of others), and cognitive-perceptual problems (symptoms: identity disturbance in terms of self perception, transient paranoid thoughts or feelings of dissociation in stressful situations). This review aimed to summarise the current evidence of drug treatment effects in BPD from high-quality randomised trials.

Available studies tested the effects of antipsychotic, antidepressant and mood stabiliser treatment in BPD. In addition, the dietary supplement omega-3 fatty acid (commonly derived from fish) which is supposed to have mood stabilising effects was tested. Twenty-eight studies covering 1742 study participants were included.

The findings tended to suggest a benefit from using second-generation antipsychotics, mood stabilisers, and omega-3 fatty acids, but most effect estimates were based on single study effects so repeat studies would be useful. Moreover, the long-term use of these drugs has not been assessed. The small amount of available information for individual comparisons indicated marginal effects for first-generation antipsychotics and antidepressants.

The data also indicated that there may be an increase in self-harming behaviour in patients treated with olanzapine. In general, attention must be paid to adverse effects. Most trials did not provide detailed data of adverse effects and thus could not be considered within this review. We assumed their effects were similar to those experienced by patients with other conditions. Available data of the studies included here suggested adverse effects included weight gain, sedation and change of haemogram parameters with olanzapine treatment, and weight loss with topiramate. Very few beneficial effects were identified for first-generation antipsychotics and antidepressants. However, they may be helpful in the presence of comorbid problems that are not part of BPD core pathology, but can often be found in BPD patients.

There are only few study results per drug comparison, with small numbers of included participants. Thus, current findings of trials and this review are not robust and can easily be changed by future research endeavours. In addition, the studies may not adequately reflect several characteristics of clinical settings (among others, patients' characteristics and duration of interventions and observation periods).

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pharmacologiques pour le traitement du trouble de la personnalité limite

Contexte

Les traitements pharmacologiques sont largement utilisés dans le traitement du trouble de la personnalité limite (TPL). Ils sont choisis pour leurs propriétés avérées dans d'autres troubles mentaux (emploi non conforme) et ciblent principalement les groupes de symptômes affectifs ou impulsifs.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets du traitement pharmacologique chez les patients atteints de TPL.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons consulté les bases de données bibliographiques conformément à la stratégie du groupe Cochrane sur les troubles du développement, de l'apprentissage et psychosociaux jusqu'en septembre 2009, examiné les références bibliographiques des articles et contacté des chercheurs travaillant dans ce domaine.

Critères de sélection

Les études randomisées comparant un médicament à un placebo, ou un médicament à d'autres médicaments chez des patients atteints de TPL. Les critères de jugement comprenaient la gravité globale du TPL, les aspects symptomatiques spécifiques au TPL selon les critères DSM-IV, la psychopathologie associée non spécifique au TPL, l'attrition et les effets indésirables.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont sélectionné les essais, évalué la qualité et extrait les données de manière indépendante.

Résultats Principaux

Vingt-huit essais portant sur un total de 1 742 participants ont été inclus. Des antipsychotiques de première génération (décanoate de flupenthixol, halopéridol, thiothixène) ; des antipsychotiques de deuxième génération (aripiprazole, olanzapine, ziprasidone), des stabilisateurs de l'humeur (carbamazépine, valproate de semi-sodium, lamotrigine, topiramate), des antidépresseurs (amitriptyline, fluoxétine, fluvoxamine, sulfate de phénelzine, miansérine) et des suppléments alimentaires (acide gras oméga-3) ont été évalués. Les antipsychotiques de première génération étaient évalués dans des essais relativement anciens, tandis que les études récentes examinaient des antipsychotiques de deuxième génération et des stabilisateurs de l'humeur. Peu de données étaient disponibles pour les différentes comparaisons, et les résultats suggéraient des effets marginaux associés aux antipsychotiques de première génération et aux antidépresseurs.

Les résultats semblaient étayer l'efficacité des antipsychotiques de deuxième génération, des stabilisateurs de l'humeur et des acides gras oméga-3, mais ils devront être répliqués car la plupart des estimations de l'effet reposaient sur des études individuelles. L'utilisation à long terme de ces médicaments n'a pas été évaluée.

Peu de données étaient disponibles concernant les événements indésirables, excepté pour l'olanzapine. Une augmentation potentielle de l'automutilation, une prise de poids significative, une sédation et une variation des paramètres de l'hémogramme étaient observés sous olanzapine. Une réduction significative du poids corporel était observée sous topiramate. Tous les médicaments étaient bien tolérés en termes d'attrition.

Les comparaisons directes portaient sur deux antipsychotiques de première génération (loxapine versus chlorpromazine), un antipsychotique de première génération par rapport à un antidépresseur (halopéridol versus amitriptyline ; halopéridol versus sulfate de phénelzine), et un antipsychotique de deuxième génération par rapport à un antidépresseur (olanzapine versus fluoxétine). Les données indiquaient de meilleurs résultats sous sulfate de phénelzine, mais aucune différence significative pour les autres comparaisons, à l'exception de l'olanzapine, qui était associée à une prise de poids et une sédation supérieures par rapport à la fluoxétine. Le seul essai comparant un traitement pharmacologique seul versus combiné (olanzapine versus olanzapine + fluoxétine ; fluoxétine versus fluoxétine + olanzapine) ne rapportait aucune différence significative en termes de résultats.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les preuves disponibles suggèrent certains effets bénéfiques associés aux antipsychotiques de deuxième génération, aux stabilisateurs de l'humeur et aux suppléments alimentaires à base d'acides gras oméga-3. Néanmoins, ces résultats reposent principalement sur des estimations de l'effet issues d'études individuelles. Les antidépresseurs ne peuvent pas être systématiquement recommandés dans le traitement du TPL, mais pourraient être utiles en présence de troubles comorbides. Aucun médicament n'avait d'impact significatif sur la gravité globale du TPL. Aucun résultat prometteur n'a été identifié concernant les principaux symptômes du TPL, tels que la sensation chronique de vide, les troubles de l'identité et la peur de l'abandon. Ces résultats doivent être interprétés avec précaution en raison des diverses limitations observées dans les ECR, qui réduisent leur applicabilité aux environnements cliniques habituels (notamment les caractéristiques des patients et la durée des interventions et des périodes d'observation).

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pharmacologiques pour le traitement du trouble de la personnalité limite

Traitement médicamenteux pour le traitement du trouble de la personnalité limite

De nombreux patients atteints de trouble de la personnalité limite (TPL) reçoivent un traitement médical. Néanmoins, il n'existe aucun médicament spécifiquement conçu pour traiter le TPL. On choisit souvent un médicament en particulier pour ses propriétés établies dans le traitement de troubles associés, ou de symptômes de TPL se manifestant également dans d'autres pathologies, telles que les troubles dépressifs, psychotiques ou anxieux. Le TPL se caractérise par une forte instabilité de la régulation des affects (avec des symptômes tels qu'une colère injustifiée, une sensation chronique de vide et une instabilité affective) et du contrôle des impulsions (symptômes : automutilation, comportement et idées suicidaires ou menaces de suicide), des problèmes relationnels (symptômes : efforts frénétiques pour éviter l'abandon, relations instables avec idéalisation et dévalorisation des autres) et des problèmes cognitifs et perceptifs (symptômes : troubles de l'identité liés à la perception de soi, pensées paranoïdes transitoires ou sensation de dissociation dans des situations stressantes). L'objectif de cette revue était de résumer les preuves actuelles issues d'essais randomisés de haute qualité concernant les effets du traitement pharmacologique du TPL.

Les études disponibles évaluaient les effets d'un antipsychotique, d'un antidépresseur et d'un stabilisateur de l'humeur dans le TPL. Un complément alimentaire à base d'acides gras oméga-3 (généralement dérivés du poisson), censé présenter des effets stabilisateurs de l'humeur, était également évalué. Vingt-huit études portant sur 1 742 participants ont été incluses.

Les résultats tendaient à suggérer un bénéfice associé à l'utilisation d'antipsychotiques de deuxième génération, de stabilisateurs de l'humeur et d'acides gras oméga-3, mais la plupart des estimations de l'effet reposaient sur les résultats d'études individuelles qui devraient être répliqués dans d'autres études. De plus, l'utilisation à long terme de ces médicaments n'a pas été évaluée. Les rares informations disponibles pour les différentes comparaisons indiquaient des effets marginaux associés aux antipsychotiques de première génération et aux antidépresseurs.

Les données indiquaient également qu'une augmentation de l'automutilation pourrait être observée chez les patients sous olanzapine. De manière générale, les effets indésirables doivent faire l'objet d'une attention particulière. La plupart des essais ne détaillaient pas les effets indésirables, qui n'ont pas pu être évalués dans le cadre de cette revue. Nous sommes partis du principe que leurs effets étaient similaires à ceux rapportés par les patients présentant d'autres troubles. Les données disponibles dans les études incluses suggéraient des effets indésirables tels qu'une prise de poids, une sédation et une variation des paramètres de l'hémogramme sous olanzapine, et une perte de poids sous topiramate. Très peu d'effets bénéfiques étaient identifiés pour les antipsychotiques de première génération et les antidépresseurs. Néanmoins, ils pourraient être utiles en présence de problèmes comorbides qui ne font pas partie de la pathologie principale du TPL mais sont souvent observés chez des patients atteints de TPL.

Peu de résultats sont disponibles pour les différentes comparaisons, et les études examinées portent sur des effectifs réduits. Les résultats actuels des essais et de cette revue manquent de solidité et sont susceptibles d'être modifiés lorsque d'autres recherches auront été réalisées. En outre, il se pourrait que les études ne reflètent pas correctement plusieurs des caractéristiques de l'environnement clinique (notamment les caractéristiques des patients et la durée des interventions et des périodes d'observation).

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st May, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.