Intervention Protocol

Higher versus lower amino acid intake in parenteral nutrition for newborn infants

  1. John KH Sinn1,*,
  2. Kiran Kumar2,
  3. David A Osborn3,
  4. Srinivas Bolisetty4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Neonatal Group

Published Online: 19 APR 2006

Assessed as up-to-date: 8 JAN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005949


How to Cite

Sinn JKH, Kumar K, Osborn DA, Bolisetty S. Higher versus lower amino acid intake in parenteral nutrition for newborn infants (Protocol). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2006, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD005949. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005949.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Royal North Shore Hospital, The University of Sydney, Department of Neonatology, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

  2. 2

    Women's and Children's Hospital, Neonatal Unit, South Australia, South Australia, Australia

  3. 3

    University of Sydney, Central Clinical School, Discipline of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Neonatology, Sydney, NSW, Australia

  4. 4

    Royal Hospital for Women, Randwick, NSW, Australia

*John KH Sinn, Department of Neonatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, The University of Sydney, St. Leonard's, Sydney, New South Wales, 2065, Australia. jsinn@med.usyd.edu.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 19 APR 2006

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Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows:

To determine whether higher versus lower intake of amino acid is associated with improved growth and disability free survival in newborn infants receiving parenteral nutrition.

Seconday objectives include to determine if:

  • higher versus lower starting or initial intake of amino acids is associated with improved growth and disability free survival without toxicity or side effects;
  • higher versus lower intake of amino acids at maximal intake is associated with improved growth and disability free survival without toxicity or side effects;
  • the increase in amino acid intake should replace non-protein energy intake (glucose and lipid), be in addition to non-protein energy intake, or be increased simultaneously with non-protein energy intake.

In subgroup analyses, additional objectives are to determine whether the effect of higher versus lower intake of amino acids is affected by gestational age, birth weight, age at commencement, condition of the infant or concomitant increases in fluid intakes.