Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Dynamic compression plating versus locked intramedullary nailing for humeral shaft fractures in adults

  1. Harish Kurup1,*,
  2. Munier Hossain2,
  3. J Glynne Andrew2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group

Published Online: 15 JUN 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 17 FEB 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005959.pub2


How to Cite

Kurup H, Hossain M, Andrew JG. Dynamic compression plating versus locked intramedullary nailing for humeral shaft fractures in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 6. Art. No.: CD005959. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005959.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, UK

  2. 2

    North West Wales NHS Trust, Department of Orthopaedics, Bangor, Wales, UK

*Harish Kurup, Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, HP21 8AL, UK. harishvk@yahoo.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 15 JUN 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé scientifique
  6. Résumé simplifié

Background

Surgical fixation of fractures of the shaft of the humerus generally involves plating or nailing. It is unclear whether one method is more effective than the other.

Objectives

To compare compression plating and locked intramedullary nailing for primary surgical fixation (surgical fixation of an acute fracture or early fixation following failure of conservative treatment) of humeral shaft fractures in adults.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (February 2011), The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 1, MEDLINE and EMBASE (both to February 2011) and trial registries for ongoing trials.

Selection criteria

Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing compression plates and locked intramedullary nail fixation for humeral shaft fractures in adults.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed trial methodology and extracted data. Disagreement was resolved by discussion, or third party adjudication. Treatment effects were assessed using risk ratios for dichotomous data and mean differences for continuous data, together with 95% confidence intervals. Where appropriate, data were pooled using a fixed-effect model.

Main results

Five small trials comparing dynamic compression plates with locked intramedullary nailing were included in this review. These involved a total of 260 participants undergoing surgery for either acute fractures or after early failure of conservative treatment. All five trials had methodological flaws, such as the lack of assessor blinding, that could have influenced their findings. There was no significant difference in fracture union between plating and nailing (five trials, RR 1.05; 95% CI 0.97 to 1.13). There was a statistically significant increase in shoulder impingement following nailing when compared with plating (five trials, RR 0.12; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.38). Intramedullary nails were removed significantly more frequently than plates (three trials, RR 0.17; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.76). There was no statistically significant difference between plating and nailing in operating time, blood loss during surgery, iatrogenic radial nerve injury, return to pre-injury occupation by six months or American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores.

Two further small trials are awaiting classification.

Authors' conclusions

The available evidence shows that intramedullary nailing is associated with an increased risk of shoulder impingement, with a related increase in restriction of shoulder movement and need for removal of metalwork. There was insufficient evidence to determine if there were any other important differences, including in functional outcome, between dynamic compression plating and locked intramedullary nailing for humeral shaft fractures.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé scientifique
  6. Résumé simplifié

A comparison of compression plates and locked nails for surgically fixing fractures of the upper arm bone (humerus) in adults

Fractures (breaks) of the humerus are commonly treated without an operation. The indications for surgery are not completely clear, but often include open fractures (fractures exposed to contamination through the skin) or unstable fractures such as segmental fractures (where there are two or more fractures in the same bone with a free fragment in between).

When an operation is needed the choice is usually between a plate or an intramedullary nail. Plating is achieved by exposing the fracture site, fixing a plate to the bone and securing it with screws. Intramedullary nailing is performed through small cuts in the skin. The nail is inserted to lie within the central cavity of the bone through a carefully prepared hole, usually at the top end of the humerus. Locking screws in both ends may be used to further stabilize the nail.

Five poor quality trials were included in this review. These involved a total of 260 participants who were randomly assigned to having their humerus fractures fixed with either a plate or a nail. Both nailing and plating had similar fracture union rates. Compared with plating, nailing was associated with an increased risk of shoulder impingement involving shoulder pain and restrictions in shoulder range of movement. Usually because of impingement, nails had to be removed more frequently than plates. The limited available evidence did not show important differences between the two surgical methods in the other outcomes reported by one or more trials. These outcomes included nerve injury, infection, healing time, operating time, blood loss and return to pre-injury occupation.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé scientifique
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antecedentes

Placas de compresión dinámica versus clavo intramedular cerrado para la fractura de diáfisis humeral en adultos

La fijación quirúrgica de la fractura de diáfisis humeral generalmente incluye la colocación de placas o clavos. No está claro si un método es más efectivo que el otro.

Objetivos

Comparar las placas de compresión y el clavo intramedular cerrado para la fijación quirúrgica primaria (fijación quirúrgica de una fractura aguda o una fijación temprana luego del fracaso del tratamiento conservador) de la fractura de diáfisis humeral en adultos.

Estrategia de búsqueda

Se realizaron búsquedas en el Registro Especializado del Grupo Cochrane de Lesiones Óseas, Articulares y Musculares (Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group) (febrero 2011), The Cochrane Library 2011, número 1, MEDLINE y EMBASE (ambos hasta febrero 2011) y en registros de ensayos en curso.

Criterios de selección

Ensayos controlados aleatorios y cuasialeatorios que compararan la fijación con placas de compresión versus el clavo intramedular cerrado para la fractura de diáfisis humeral en adultos.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Dos autores, de forma independiente, evaluaron la metodología de los ensayos y extrajeron los datos. Los desacuerdos se resolvieron mediante discusión, o la opinión de un tercero. Se evaluaron los efectos del tratamiento mediante los cocientes de riesgos para los datos dicotómicos y las diferencias de medias para los datos continuos, junto con intervalos de confianza del 95%. Cuando fue apropiado, los datos se agruparon mediante un modelo de efectos fijos.

Resultados principales

En esta revisión, se incluyeron cinco ensayos pequeños que compararon las placas de compresión dinámica con el clavo intramedular cerrado. Los mismos incluyeron a un total de 260 participantes sometidos a cirugía por fractura aguda o luego del fracaso temprano del tratamiento conservador. Los cinco ensayos tuvieron defectos metodológicos, como la ausencia de cegamiento del evaluador, lo cual podría haber influido en sus hallazgos. No hubo diferencias significativas en la unión de la fractura entre las placas y el clavo (cinco ensayos, CR 1,05; IC del 95%: 0,97 a 1,13). Hubo un aumento estadísticamente significativo en la fricción subacromial luego de la colocación del clavo en comparación con las placas (cinco ensayos, CR 0,12; IC del 95%: 0,04 a 0,38). Los clavos intramedulares se extrajeron con una frecuencia significativamente mayor que las placas (tres ensayos, CR 0,17; IC del 95%: 0,04 a 0,76). No hubo diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre las placas y el clavo en cuanto al tiempo quirúrgico, la pérdida de sangre durante la cirugía, la lesión iatrogénica del nervio radial, el retorno a la ocupación previa a la lesión a los seis meses o las puntuaciones de los American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (Cirujanos Estadounidenses del Hombro y Codo) (ASES).

Dos pequeños ensayos adicionales están a la espera de clasificación.

Conclusiones de los autores

Las pruebas disponibles muestran que el clavo intramedular se asocia con un mayor riesgo de fricción subacromial, con un aumento relacionado en la restricción del movimiento del hombro y la necesidad de extracción de la pieza de metal. No hubo pruebas suficientes para determinar si hubo otras diferencias importantes, incluso en el resultado funcional, entre las placas de compresión dinámica y el clavo intramedular cerrado para la fractura de diáfisis humeral.

Traducción

Traducción realizada por el Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé scientifique
  6. Résumé simplifié

Plaque à compression dynamique versus clous médullaires verrouillés pour le traitement des fractures de la diaphyse humérale chez l'adulte

Contexte

La fixation chirurgicale des fractures de la diaphyse de l'humérus implique généralement la pose d'une plaque ou d'un clou. On ignore cependant si l'une des méthodes est plus efficace que l'autre.

Objectifs

Comparer les plaques à compression aux clous médullaires verrouillés dans la fixation chirurgicale primaire (fixation chirurgicale d'une fracture aiguë ou fixation précoce suite à l'échec du traitement conservateur) des fractures de la diaphyse de l'humérus chez l'adulte.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons consulté le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les traumatismes ostéo-articulaires et musculaires (février 2011), la Bibliothèque Cochrane, 2011, numéro 1, MEDLINE et EMBASE (jusqu'en février 2011 pour ces deux sources) et avons recherché des essais en cours dans les registres d'essais cliniques.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés et quasi-randomisés comparant des plaques à compression à des clous médullaires verrouillés dans la fixation des fractures de la diaphyse de l'humérus chez l'adulte.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont évalué la méthodologie des essais et extrait les données de manière indépendante. Les divergences ont été résolues par discussion ou par décision d'un tiers. Les effets du traitement ont été évalués à l'aide des risques relatifs pour les données dichotomiques et des différences moyennes pour les données continues, avec des intervalles de confiance à 95 % dans les deux cas. Lorsque cela était approprié, les données ont été combinées à l'aide d'un modèle à effets fixes.

Résultats principaux

Cinq petits essais comparant des plaques à compression dynamique à des clous médullaires verrouillés ont été inclus dans cette revue. Ces essais portaient sur un total de 260 participants subissant une chirurgie pour cause de fracture aiguë ou après l'échec précoce du traitement conservateur. Les cinq essais présentaient tous des défauts méthodologiques, notamment une absence d'assignation en aveugle de l'évaluateur, qui étaient susceptibles d'avoir influencé les résultats. Aucune différence significative n'était observée entre les plaques et les clous en termes de consolidation de la fracture (cinq essais, RR de 1,05 ; IC à 95% entre 0,97 et 1,13). Une augmentation statistiquement significative du syndrome de conflit sous-acromial était observée avec les clous par rapport aux plaques (cinq essais, RR de 0,12 ; IC à 95% entre 0,04 et 0,38). Les clous médullaires faisaient l'objet d'un retrait significativement plus fréquent que les plaques (trois essais, RR de 0,17 ; IC à 95% entre 0,04 et 0,76). Aucune différence statistiquement significative n'était observée entre les plaques et les clous en termes de durée de l'opération, de perte de sang pendant la chirurgie, de lésion iatrogène du nerf radial, de reprise des activités habituelles dans les six mois ou de scores ASES (échelle des chirurgiens nord-américains du coude et de l'épaule).

Deux autres petits essais sont en attente de classification.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les preuves disponibles montrent que les clous médullaires sont associés à un risque accru de syndrome de conflit sous-acromial accompagné d'une restriction accrue du mouvement de l'épaule et du retrait des pièces métalliques. Les preuves étaient insuffisantes pour identifier d'autres différences importantes, y compris concernant les résultats fonctionnels, entre les plaques à compression dynamique et les clous médullaires verrouillés dans les fractures de la diaphyse de l'humérus.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé scientifique
  6. Résumé simplifié

Comparaison entre des plaques à compression et des clous verrouillés pour la fixation chirurgicale des fractures de l'os de la partie supérieure du bras (humérus) chez l'adulte

Les fractures de l'humérus font souvent l'objet d'un traitement non chirurgical. Les indications chirurgicales ne sont pas totalement claires mais incluent souvent les fractures ouvertes (fractures exposées à la contamination au travers de la peau) ou les fractures instables telles que les fractures à double étage (où un même os présente au moins deux fractures avec détachement d'un fragment intermédiaire).

Lorsqu'une opération est nécessaire, le choix se limite généralement à l'utilisation d'une plaque ou d'un clou médullaire. La plaque est fixée à l'os après exposition du site de la fracture avant d'être bloquée au moyen de vis. Les clous médullaires sont mis en place au travers de petites entailles pratiquées dans la peau. Le clou est inséré de manière à être positionné dans la cavité centrale de l'os par un orifice soigneusement préparé, qui se trouve généralement à l'extrémité supérieure de l'humérus. Des vis verrouillées aux deux extrémités peuvent être utilisées pour stabiliser encore davantage le clou.

Cinq essais de faible qualité ont été inclus dans cette revue. Ces essais portaient sur un total de 260 participants randomisés pour une fixation de la fracture de l'humérus à l'aide d'une plaque ou d'un clou. Les clous et les plaques étaient associés à des taux de consolidation similaires. Par rapport aux plaques, les clous étaient associés à un risque accru de syndrome de conflit sous-acromial entraînant des douleurs et une restriction de l'amplitude de mouvement de l'épaule. Ce syndrome de conflit sous-acromial associé aux clous implique de les retirer plus fréquemment que les plaques. Les preuves limitées disponibles ne révèlent aucune différence importante entre les deux méthodes chirurgicales concernant les autres critères de jugement rapportés dans un ou plusieurs essais. Ces critères de jugement incluaient les lésions nerveuses, l'infection, le temps de cicatrisation, la durée de l'opération, la perte de sang et la reprise des activités habituelles.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st July, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.