Intervention Review

Dietary interventions for preventing complications in idiopathic hypercalciuria

  1. Joaquin Escribano1,*,
  2. Albert Balaguer2,
  3. Marta Roqué i Figuls3,
  4. Albert Feliu1,
  5. Natalia Ferre4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Renal Group

Published Online: 11 FEB 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 23 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006022.pub4


How to Cite

Escribano J, Balaguer A, Roqué i Figuls M, Feliu A, Ferre N. Dietary interventions for preventing complications in idiopathic hypercalciuria. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD006022. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006022.pub4.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Hospital Universitari St Joan de Reus, Department of Pediatrics, Reus, Catalonia, Spain

  2. 2

    Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Department of Pediatrics. Hospital General de Catalunya., Barcelona, CATALONIA, Spain

  3. 3

    CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Iberoamerican Cochrane Centre, Biomedical Research Institute Sant Pau (IIB Sant Pau), Barcelona, Catalunya, Spain

  4. 4

    Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Pediatric Research Unit, School of Medicine, Tarragona, Spain

*Joaquin Escribano, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Universitari St Joan de Reus, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, St Joan s/n, Reus, Catalonia, 43201, Spain. JESCRIBANO@GRUPSAGESSA.COM.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 11 FEB 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Idiopathic hypercalciuria is an inherited metabolic abnormality that is characterised by excessive amounts of calcium excreted in the urine by people whose calcium serum levels are normal. Morbidity associated with idiopathic hypercalciuria is chiefly related to kidney stone disease and bone demineralisation leading to osteopenia and osteoporosis. Idiopathic hypercalciuria contributes to kidney stone disease at all life stages; people with the condition are prone to developing oxalate and calcium phosphate kidney stones. In some cases, crystallised calcium can be deposited in the renal interstitium, causing increased calcium levels in the kidneys. In children, idiopathic hypercalciuria can cause a range of comorbidities including recurrent macroscopic or microscopic haematuria, frequency dysuria syndrome, urinary tract infections and abdominal and lumbar pain. Various dietary interventions have been described that aim to decrease urinary calcium levels or urinary crystallisation.

Objectives

Our objectives were to assess the efficacy, effectiveness and safety of dietary interventions for preventing complications in idiopathic hypercalciuria (urolithiasis and osteopenia) in adults and children, and to assess the benefits of dietary interventions in decreasing urological symptomatology in children with idiopathic hypercalciuria.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's Specialised Register (23 April 2013) through contact with the Trials' Search Co-ordinator using search terms relevant to this review. Studies contained in the Specialised Register are identified through search strategies specifically designed for CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE.

Selection criteria

We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs that investigated dietary interventions aimed at preventing complications of idiopathic hypercalciuria, compared with placebo, no intervention, or other dietary interventions regardless of route of administration, dose or amount.

Data collection and analysis

Studies were assessed for inclusion and data extracted using a standardised data extraction form. We calculated risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences (MD) for continuous outcomes, both with 95% confidence intervals (CI).

Main results

We included five studies (379 adult participants) that investigated a range of interventions. Lack of similarity among interventions investigated meant that data could not be pooled. Overall, study methodology was not adequately reported in any of the included studies. There was a high risk of bias associated with blinding (although it seems unlikely that outcomes measures were unduly influenced by lack of intervention blinding), random sequence generation and allocation methodologies were unclear in most studies, but selective reporting bias was assessed as low.

One study (120 participants) compared a low calcium diet with a normal calcium, low protein, low salt diet for five years. There was a significant decrease in numbers of new stone recurrences in those treated with the normal calcium, low protein, low salt diet (RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.98). This diet also led to a significant decrease in oxaluria (MD 78.00 µmol/d, 95% CI 26.48 to 129.52) and the calcium oxalate relative supersaturation index (MD 1.20 95% CI 0.21 to 2.19).

One study (210 participants) compared a low salt, normal calcium diet with a broad diet for three months. The low salt, normal calcium diet decreased urinary calcium (MD -45.00 mg/d, 95% CI -74.83 to -15.17) and oxalate excretion (MD -4.00 mg/d, 95% CI -6.44 to -1.56).

A small study (17 participants) compared the effect of dietary fibre as part of a low calcium, low oxalate diet over three weeks, and found that although calciuria levels decreased, oxaluria increased.

Phyllanthus niruri plant substrate intake was investigated in a small subgroup with hypercalciuria (20 participants); there was no significant effect on calciuria levels occurred after three months of treatment.

A small cross-over study (12 participants) evaluating the changes in urinary supersaturation indices among patients who consumed calcium-fortified orange juice or milk for one month found no benefits for participants.

None of the studies reported any significant adverse effects associated with the interventions.

Authors' conclusions

Long-term adherence (five years) to diets that feature normal levels of calcium, low protein and low salt may reduce numbers of stone recurrences, decrease oxaluria and calcium oxalate relative supersaturation indexes in people with idiopathic hypercalciuria who experience recurrent kidney stones. Adherence to a low salt, normal calcium level diet for some months can reduce calciuria and oxaluria. However, the other dietary interventions examined did not demonstrate evidence of significant beneficial effects.

No studies were found investigating the effect of dietary recommendations on other clinical complications or asymptomatic idiopathic hypercalciuria.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Dietary interventions for preventing complications in idiopathic hypercalciuria

Hypercalciuria, an inherited metabolic condition, is the presence of excessive calcium in the urine. The cause is often unknown (idiopathic), and may occur in people who are otherwise well. Although people with the condition have normal levels of calcium in their blood, calcium is lost through the urine.

Adults with hypercalciuria are prone to developing kidney stones and losing calcium from their bones. In children, hypercalciuria can cause blood in the urine (haematuria), frequency-dysuria syndrome (frequent painful or difficult urination), urinary tract infections, abdominal and back pain.

It has been suggested that altering the diets of people with hypercalciuria could help to prevent complications of the condition. We therefore aimed to evaluate the benefits and harms of dietary interventions that had been investigated in clinical studies. We included five studies in our review, one of which compared a low calcium diet with a diet that included normal levels of calcium, low protein, low salt over five years. This study found that diets unrestricted for calcium intake significantly decreased numbers of new kidney stones.

Other dietary interventions, such as unprocessed wheat bran, did not show any evidence of beneficial effects.

We did not find any studies in children, and none investigating specific dietary recommendations for those who had hypercalciuria without symptoms.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions diététiques pour la prévention des complications en cas d'hypercalciurie idiopathique

Contexte

L'hypercalciurie idiopathique est une anomalie métabolique congénitale qui se caractérise par des quantités excessives de calcium excrétées dans l'urine par des personnes dont les niveaux de calcium sérique sont normaux. La morbidité associée à l'hypercalciurie idiopathique est principalement liée à l'urolithiase et à la déminéralisation osseuse entraînant l'ostéopénie et l'ostéoporose. L'hypercalciurie idiopathique contribue à l'urolithiase à tous les stades de la vie ; les personnes atteintes de cette affection sont sujettes à la formation de calculs rénaux composés d'oxalate et de phosphate de calcium. Dans certains cas, des dépôts de calcium cristallisé se forment dans l'interstitium rénal, entraînant une augmentation du taux de calcium dans les reins. Chez l'enfant, l'hypercalciurie idiopathique peut entraîner un éventail de co-morbidités y compris l'hématurie récurrente macroscopique ou microscopique, le syndrome de dysurie-pollakiurie, les infections des voies urinaires et les douleurs abdominales et lombaires. Diverses interventions diététiques ont été décrites visant à réduire les niveaux de calcium urinaire ou la cristallisation urinaire.

Objectifs

Nos objectifs étaient d'évaluer l'efficacité, l'efficience et l'innocuité des interventions diététiques pour la prévention des complications de l'hypercalciurie idiopathique (urolithiase et ostéopénie) chez l'adulte et l'enfant, et d'évaluer les bénéfices des interventions diététiques dans la diminution de la symptomatologie urologique chez l'enfant atteint d'hypercalciurie idiopathique.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons contacté le coordinateur de recherche d'études du groupe Cochrane sur la néphrologie afin d'effectuer des recherches dans le registre spécialisé (le 23 avril 2013) en utilisant des termes de recherche pertinents pour cette revue. Les études répertoriées dans le registre spécialisé ont été identifiées par des stratégies de recherche spécifiquement conçues pour CENTRAL, MEDLINE et EMBASE.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus tous les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) et quasi randomisés examinant les interventions diététiques visant à prévenir les complications de l'hypercalciurie idiopathique, par rapport à un placebo, à l'absence d'intervention ou à d'autres interventions diététiques indépendamment de la voie d'administration, de la dose ou de la quantité.

Recueil et analyse des données

Les études ont été évaluées pour inclusion et les données ont été extraites en utilisant un formulaire d'extraction de données standardisé. Nous avons calculé les risques relatifs (RR) pour les résultats dichotomiques et les différences moyennes (DM) pour les résultats continus, avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 %.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons inclus cinq études (379 participants adultes) qui examinaient un éventail d'interventions. En raison du manque de similarités entre les interventions examinées, les données n'ont pas pu être regroupées. Dans l'ensemble, la méthodologie n'était correctement rapportée dans aucune des études incluses. Il y avait un risque élevé de biais associé à la mise en aveugle (bien qu'il semble peu probable que les critères de jugement mesurés aient été indûment influencés par un manque de mise en aveugle dans les interventions), tandis que la génération de séquences aléatoires et la méthodologie d'assignation n'étaient pas clairement expliquées dans la plupart des études, même si le biais de reporting a été évalué comme étant faible.

Une étude (120 participants) comparait sur cinq ans une alimentation pauvre en calcium à un régime alimentaire avec des apports normaux en calcium pauvre en protéines et en sel. Il y avait une réduction significative du nombre de nouveaux calculs chez les personnes suivant le régime avec des apports normaux en calcium et pauvre en protéines et en sel (RR 0,77, IC à 95 % 0,61 à 0,98). Ce régime a également entraîné une diminution significative de l'hyperoxalurie (DM de 78,00 µmol/j, IC à 95 % 26,48 à 129,52) et de l'indice de supersaturation relative en oxalate de calcium (DM de 1,20, IC à 95 % 0,21 à 2,19).

Une étude (210 participants) comparait sur trois mois une alimentation pauvre en sel avec des apports normaux en calcium et un régime alimentaire varié. Le régime pauvre en sel aux apports calciques normaux a réduit le calcium urinaire (DM -45,00 mg/j, IC à 95 % -74,83 à -15,17) et l'excrétion d'oxalate (DM -4,00 mg/j, IC à 95 % -6,44 à -1,56).

Une petite étude (17 participants) comparait sur trois semaines l'effet de fibres alimentaires dans le cadre d'un régime pauvre en calcium et en oxalate et a observé que, bien que les niveaux de calciurie baissaient, l'hyperoxalurie augmentait.

Un apport de substrat végétal à base de Phyllanthus niruri a été étudié dans un petit sous-groupe atteint d'hypercalciurie (20 participants) ; aucun effet significatif sur les niveaux de calciurie n'a été observé après trois mois de traitement.

Une petite étude croisée (12 participants) évaluant les changements dans les indices de supersaturation urinaire chez des patients ayant consommé du jus d'orange ou du lait enrichi en calcium pendant un mois n'a révélé aucun effet bénéfique pour les participants.

Aucune des études ne rapportait d'effets indésirables significatifs associés aux interventions.

Conclusions des auteurs

L'observance à long terme (cinq ans) d'un régime alimentaire avec des niveaux de calcium normaux pauvre en protéines et en sel pourrait réduire les récidives de calculs et diminuer l'hyperoxalurie ainsi que les indices de supersaturation relative en oxalate de calcium chez les personnes atteintes d'hypercalciurie idiopathique souffrant de calculs rénaux récurrents. L'observance d'un régime pauvre en sel avec des apports calciques normaux pendant quelques mois peut réduire les niveaux de calciurie et d'hyperoxalurie. Cependant, les autres interventions diététiques examinées n'ont pas apporté de preuve d'effets bénéfiques significatifs.

Aucune étude n'a été trouvée concernant l'effet des recommandations alimentaires sur d'autres complications cliniques ou sur l'hypercalciurie idiopathique asymptomatique.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les interventions diététiques pour la prévention des complications en cas d'hypercalciurie idiopathique

L'hypercalciurie, une affection métabolique héréditaire, est la présence d'un excès de calcium dans les urines. La cause en est souvent inconnue (idiopathique), et elle peut se produire chez des personnes qui se portent par ailleurs bien. Bien que le niveau de calcium dans le sang des personnes atteintes de cette affection soit normal, le calcium est éliminé dans l'urine.

Les adultes atteints d'hypercalciurie sont sujets à la formation de calculs rénaux et à la perte de calcium osseux. Chez les enfants, l'hypercalciurie peut occasionner la présence de sang dans les urines (hématurie), un syndrome de dysurie fréquente (miction fréquente douloureuse ou difficile), des infections des voies urinaires et des douleurs abdominales ou dorsales.

Il a été suggéré que la modification de l'alimentation des personnes atteintes d'hypercalciurie peut aider à prévenir les complications de la maladie. Nous avons donc cherché à évaluer les bénéfices et les inconvénients des interventions diététiques considérées dans des études cliniques. Nous avons inclus cinq études dans notre revue, dont l'un comparait sur cinq ans une alimentation pauvre en calcium à un régime alimentaire avec des apports normaux en calcium pauvre en protéines et en sel. Cette étude a constaté que les régimes sans restriction de l'apport en calcium réduisaient significativement le nombre de nouveaux calculs rénaux.

D'autres interventions diététiques, tels que le son de blé complet, n'ont apporté aucune preuve d'effets bénéfiques.

Nous n'avons pas trouvé d'études portant sur des enfants, ni aucune étude examinant des recommandations alimentaires spécifiques pour les personnes atteintes d'hypercalciurie sans symptômes.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 15th June, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé