Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Acupuncture for glaucoma

  1. Simon K Law1,*,
  2. Tianjing Li2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group

Published Online: 31 MAY 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 18 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006030.pub3


How to Cite

Law SK, Li T. Acupuncture for glaucoma. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 5. Art. No.: CD006030. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006030.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of California, Los Angeles, Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California, USA

  2. 2

    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

*Simon K Law, Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, 100 Stein Plaza 2-235, Los Angeles, California, 90095, USA. Law@jsei.ucla.edu.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 31 MAY 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Glaucoma is a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by an acquired loss of retinal ganglion cells at levels beyond normal age-related loss and corresponding atrophy of the optic nerve. Although many treatments are available to manage glaucoma, glaucoma is a chronic condition. Some patients may seek complementary or alternative medicine approaches such as acupuncture to supplement their regular treatment. The underlying plausibility of acupuncture is that disorders related to the flow of Chi (the traditional Chinese concept translated as vital force or energy) can be prevented or treated by stimulating relevant points on the body surface.

Objectives

The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in people with glaucoma.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 12), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to January 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to January 2013), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (January 1937 to January 2013), ZETOC (January 1993 to January 2013), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (January 1985 to January 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en) and the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine web site (NCCAM) (http://nccam.nih.gov). We did not use any language or date restrictions in the search for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 8 January 2013 with the exception of NCCAM which was last searched on 14 July 2010. We also handsearched Chinese medical journals at Peking Union Medical College Library in April 2007.

We searched the Chinese Acupuncture Trials Register, the Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (TCMLARS), and the Chinese Biological Database (CBM) for the original review; we did not search these databases for the 2013 review update.

Selection criteria

We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which one arm of the study involved acupuncture treatment.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently evaluated the search results and then full text articles against the eligibility criteria. We resolved discrepancies by discussion.

Main results

We included one completed and one ongoing trial, and recorded seven trials awaiting assessment for eligibility. These seven trials were written in Chinese and were identified from a systematic review on the same topic published in a Chinese journal. The completed trial compared auricular acupressure-a nonstandard acupuncture technique-with the sham procedure for glaucoma. This trial is rated at high risk of bias for masking of outcome assessors, unclear risk of bias for selective outcome reporting, and low risk of bias for other domains. The difference in intraocular pressure (measured in mm Hg) in the acupressure group was significantly less than that in the sham group at four weeks (-3.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] -7.11 to -0.29 for the right eye; -4.90, 95% CI -8.08 to -1.72 for the left eye), but was not statistically different at any other follow-up time points, including the longest follow-up time at eight weeks. No statistically significant difference in visual acuity was noted at any follow-up time points. The ongoing trial was registered with the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) of the World Health Organization. To date this trial has not recruited any participants.

Authors' conclusions

At this time, it is impossible to draw reliable conclusions from available data to support the use of acupuncture for the treatment of glaucoma. Because of ethical considerations, RCTs comparing acupuncture alone with standard glaucoma treatment or placebo are unlikely to be justified in countries where the standard of care has already been established. Because most glaucoma patients currently cared for by ophthalmologists do not use nontraditional therapy, clinical practice decisions will have to be based on physician judgments and patient preferences, given this lack of data in the literature. Inclusion of the seven Chinese trials in future updates of this review may change our conclusions.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Acupuncture as a treatment modality for patients with glaucoma

Glaucoma is a condition that damages the optic nerve and affects primarily the side vision. It is a major cause of blindness worldwide. Although many treatments are available, including eye drops, laser treatment, and surgical procedures, some patients may seek complementary or alternative medicine approaches such as acupuncture to supplement their regular treatment. This review aimed to evaluate available evidence in the findings of randomized controlled trials to assess whether acupuncture is useful and safe in treating patients with glaucoma. We included in the review one completed and one ongoing trial, and we recorded seven trials (all published in Chinese) awaiting assessment for eligibility. The completed trial was conducted in Taiwan among 33 patients. This trial compared auricular acupressure-a nonstandard acupuncture technique-versus a sham procedure (which is a fake procedure designed to resemble the real one) for glaucoma. The trial measured intraocular pressure and visual acuity during an eight-week follow-up period. The quality of this trial was not high. According to the findings of this trial, auricular acupressure lowers intraocular pressure by around 4 mm Hg for the right eye and around 5 mm Hg for the left eye at four weeks, but not significantly effective at any other time points or for any other visual outcomes. The safety of acupuncture was not examined in this trial. To date, the ongoing trial "Acupuncture for Glaucoma" has not recruited any participants. On the basis of currently available evidence, the benefit and harm of acupuncture as a therapeutic modality for glaucoma cannot be established. Inclusion of the seven Chinese trials that are awaiting assessment for eligibility in the future may change our conclusions.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

L'acupuncture pour le glaucome

Contexte

Le glaucome est une neuropathie optique multifactorielle caractérisée par une perte acquise de cellules du ganglion rétinien supérieure à la perte normale liée à l'âge et à l'atrophie correspondante du nerf optique. Bien que de nombreux traitements soient disponibles pour gérer le glaucome, le glaucome est une affection chronique. Certains patients peuvent avoir recours à une thérapie complémentaire ou à une médecine douce telle que l'acupuncture, pour compléter leur traitement régulier. L'explication sous-jacente de la plausibilité de l'acupuncture est que les troubles liés à la circulation du Chi (le concept traditionnel chinois traduit par la force vitale ou l'énergie) peuvent être prévenus ou traités par la stimulation de points concernés à la surface du corps.

Objectifs

L'objectif de cette revue était d'évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité de l'acupuncture chez les personnes atteintes d'un glaucome.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (qui contient le registre des essais cliniques du groupe Cochrane sur l'œil et la vision) ( La Bibliothèque Cochrane 2012, numéro 12), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE une mise à jour, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (de janvier 1946 à janvier 2013), EMBASE (de janvier 1980 à janvier 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Literature sur Health Sciences (LILACS) (de janvier 1982 à janvier 2013), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (de janvier 1937 à janvier 2013), ZETOC (de janvier 1993 à janvier 2013), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (de janvier 1985 à janvier 2013), le Meta Register of Controlled Trials ( m ECR) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en) et le National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) (site web http://nccam.nih.gov). Nous n'avons appliqué aucune restriction de langues ou de dates aux recherches d'essais. Nous avons effectué les dernières recherches dans les bases de données électroniques le 8 janvier 2013, à l'exception des recherches du NCCAM qui ont été effectuées le 14 juillet 2010. Nous avons également effectué une recherche manuelle dans des revues médicales chinoises à la bibliothèque du « Union Medical College » en avril 2007.

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le Registre des Essais d'Acupuncture Chinoise, le Système d'Analyse et de Récupération de la Littérature de la Médecine Traditionnelle Chinoise (Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System - TCMLARS) et la Base de Données de la Biologie Chinoise (Chinese Biological Database - CBM) pour la revue initiale, nous n'avons pas effectué de recherches dans ces bases de données pour la revue mise à jour en 2013.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) dans lesquels une partie de l'étude portait sur l'acupuncture traitement.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment comparé les résultats de recherche et ensuite les articles complets par rapport aux critères d'éligibilité. Nous avons résolu les divergences par discussion.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus un seul ECR achevé et un essai en cours, et enregistré sept essais en attente d'évaluation pour leur éligibilité. Ces sept essais ont été rédigés en chinois et ont été identifiés à partir d'une revue systématique sur le même sujet publié dans des revues chinoises.

L'essai achevé avait comparé l'acupuncture auriculaire, une technique d'acupuncture non conventionnelle, par rapport à une simulation du glaucome. Cet essai est considéré à risque élevé de biais pour l'absence d'évaluation des résultats, risque de biais incertain pour la notification sélective de résultats, et un faible risque de biais pour d'autres domaines. La différence de pression intraoculaire (mesurée en mm Hg) dans le groupe d'acupuncture était significativement inférieure à celle du groupe de traitement fictif à quatre semaines (-3,70, intervalle de confiance [IC] à -0,29 -7.11 pour l'œil droit; -4,90, IC à 95 % -8.08 à - 1,72 pour l'œil gauche), mais n'était pas statistiquement différente à d'autres périodes de suivi, y compris pour la plus longue période de suivi au bout de huit semaines. Aucune différence statistiquement significative dans l'acuité visuelle n'a été notée pendant toutes les périodes de suivi. L'essai en cours a été enregistré avec l'International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) de l'Organisation mondiale de la santé. À ce jour, cet essai n'a pas recruté de participants.

Conclusions des auteurs

À ce stade, il est impossible de tirer des conclusions fiables de données disponibles pour soutenir l'utilisation de l'acupuncture pour le traitement du glaucome. Pour des raisons d'éthique, les ECR comparant l'acupuncture seule avec le traitement du glaucome standard ou à un placebo sont peu susceptibles d'être justifiés dans les pays où le soin standard a déjà été établi. Du fait que la plupart des patients atteints de glaucome sont actuellement soignés par des ophtalmologistes qui n'utilisent pas de traitement non traditionnel, les décisions de la pratique clinique devront être basées sur des jugements scientifiques et sur la préférence du patient, étant donné le manque de données dans la littérature. L'inclusion de sept essais chinois dans les futures mises à jour de cette revue pourrait modifier nos conclusions.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

L'acupuncture pour le glaucome

L'acupuncture en tant que modalité de traitement pour les patients atteints d'un glaucome

Le glaucome est une affection qui endommage le nerf optique et affecte principalement le côté de la vision. Il est une cause majeure de cécité dans le monde. Bien que de nombreux traitements soient disponibles, y compris les gouttes ophtalmiques, le traitement au laser et les procédures chirurgicales, certains patients peuvent avoir recours à une thérapie complémentaire ou à une médecine douce telle que l'acupuncture, pour compléter leur traitement régulier. Cette revue visait à évaluer les preuves disponibles dans les résultats des essais contrôlés randomisés pour évaluer si l'acuponcture est utile et sûre dans le traitement des patients atteints d'un glaucome. Nous avons inclus dans la revue un seul ECR achevé et un essai en cours et nous avons enregistré sept essais (tous publiés en chinois) en attente d'évaluation pour leur éligibilité. L'essai achevé a été mené en Taïwan chez 33 patients. Cet essai avait comparé l'acupuncture auriculaire, une technique d'acupuncture non conventionnelle, par rapport à une simulation du glaucome (qui est une procédure fictive conçue pour ressembler à l'authentique). L'essai mesurait la pression intraoculaire et l'acuité visuelle pendant huit semaines de suivi. La qualité de cet essai n'était pas élevée. Selon les résultats de cet essai à quatre semaines, l'acupuncture auriculaire diminue la pression intraoculaire d'environ 4 mm Hg pour l'œil droit et autour de 5 mm Hg pour l'œil gauche, mais n'est pas significativement efficace à tout autre période ou pour aucun autre critère visuel. L'innocuité de l'acupuncture n'a pas été examinée dans cet essai. À ce jour, l'essai en cours « l'acupuncture pour le Glaucome » n'a pas recruté de participants. Sur la base des preuves actuellement disponibles, les effets bénéfiques et nocifs de l'acupuncture, en tant que modalité de traitement du glaucome, ne peuvent pas être établis. L'inclusion de sept essais chinois, qui sont en attente d'évaluation pour l'éligibilité, pourraient à l'avenir modifier nos conclusions.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 5th November, 2013
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�