Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Nutritional supplements for people being treated for active tuberculosis

  1. David Sinclair1,*,
  2. Katharine Abba1,
  3. Liesl Grobler2,
  4. Thambu D Sudarsanam3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group

Published Online: 9 NOV 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 1 JUL 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006086.pub3


How to Cite

Sinclair D, Abba K, Grobler L, Sudarsanam TD. Nutritional supplements for people being treated for active tuberculosis. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD006086. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006086.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, International Health Group, Liverpool, UK

  2. 2

    Cape Town, Western Province, South Africa

  3. 3

    Christian Medical College, Medicine Unit 2, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India

*David Sinclair, International Health Group, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool, L3 5QA, UK. sinclad@liverpool.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 9 NOV 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Resumo
  7. Resumo para leigos

Background

Tuberculosis and malnutrition are linked in a complex relationship. The infection may cause undernutrition through increased metabolic demands and decreased intake, and nutritional deficiencies may worsen the disease, or delay recovery by depressing important immune functions. At present, there are no evidence-based nutritional guidance for adults and children being treated for tuberculosis.

Objectives

To assess the effects of oral nutritional supplements (food, protein/energy supplements or micronutrients) on tuberculosis treatment outcomes and recovery in people on antituberculous drug therapy for active tuberculosis.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, mRCT, and the Indian Journal of Tuberculosis to July 2011, and checked the reference lists of all included studies.

Selection criteria

Randomized controlled trials comparing any oral nutritional supplement given for at least four weeks with no nutritional intervention, placebo, or dietary advice only for people being treated for active tuberculosis.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently selected trials, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias. Results are presented as risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous variables, and mean differences (MD) for continuous variables, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Where appropriate, data from trials with similar interventions and outcomes have been pooled. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE methods.

Main results

Twenty-three trials, with 6842 participants, were included.

Macronutrient supplementation

Five trials assessed the provision of free food, or high energy supplements, although none were shown to provide a total daily kilocalorie intake above the current daily recommended intake for the non-infected population.

The available trials were too small to reliably prove or exclude clinically important benefits on mortality, cure, or treatment completion. One small trial from India did find a statistically significant benefit on treatment completion, and clearance of the bacteria from the sputum, but these findings have not been confirmed in larger trials elsewhere (VERY LOW quality evidence).

The provision of free food or high-energy nutritional products probably does produce a modest increase in weight gain during treatment for active tuberculosis (MODERATE quality evidence). Two small studies provide some evidence that physical function and quality of life may also be improved but the trials were too small to have much confidence in the result (LOW quality evidence). These effects were not seen in the one trial which included only human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients.

Micronutrient supplementation

Five trials assessed multi-micronutrient supplementation in doses up to ten times the dietary reference intake, and 12 trials assessed single or dual micronutrient supplementation.

There is insufficient evidence to judge whether multi-micronutrients have a beneficial effect on mortality in HIV- negative patients with tuberculosis (VERY LOW quality evidence), but the available studies show that multi-micronutrients probably have little or no effect on mortality in HIV-positive patients with tuberculosis (MODERATE quality evidence). No studies have assessed the effects of multi-micronutrients on cure, or treatment completion.

Multi-micronutrient supplements may have little or no effect on the proportion of tuberculosis patients remaining sputum positive during the first eight weeks (LOW quality evidence), and probably have no effect on weight gain during treatment (MODERATE quality evidence). No studies have assessed quality of life.

Plasma levels of vitamin A appear to increase following initiation of tuberculosis treatment regardless of supplementation. In contrast, plasma levels of zinc, vitamin D and E, and selenium may be improved by supplementation during the early stages of tuberculosis treatment, but a consistent benefit on tuberculosis treatment outcomes or nutritional recovery has not been demonstrated.

Authors' conclusions

There is insufficient research to know whether routinely providing free food or energy supplements results in better tuberculosis treatment outcomes, or improved quality of life. Further trials, particularly from food insecure settings, should have adequate sample sizes to identify, or exclude, clinically important benefits.

Although blood levels of some vitamins may be low in patients starting treatment for active tuberculosis, there is currently no reliable evidence that routinely supplementing at or above recommended daily amounts has clinical benefits.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Resumo
  7. Resumo para leigos

Nutritional supplements for people being treated for active tuberculosis

Researchers in The Cochrane Collaboration conducted a review of the effects of nutritional supplements for people being treated for tuberculosis. After searching for relevant studies, they identified 23 relevant articles. Their findings are summarized below.

What is tuberculosis and how might nutritional supplements work?

Tuberculosis is a bacterial infection which most commonly affects the lungs. Most people who get infected never develop symptoms as their immune system manages to control the bacteria. Active tuberculosis occurs when the infection is no longer contained by the immune system, and typical symptoms are cough, chest pain, fever, night sweats, weight loss, and sometimes coughing up blood. Treatment is with a combination of antibiotic drugs, which must be taken for at least six months.

People with tuberculosis are often malnourished, and malnourished people are at higher risk of developing tuberculosis as their immune system is weakened. Nutritional supplements could help people recover from the illness by strengthening their immune system, and by improving weight gain, and muscle strength, allowing the patient to return to an active life.

Good nutrition requires a daily intake of macronutrients (carbohydrate, protein, and fat), and micronutrients (essential vitamins and minerals).

What the research says

Effect of providing nutritional supplements to people being treated for tuberculosis

We currently don't know if providing free food to tuberculosis patients, as hot meals or ration parcels, reduces death or improves cure. Providing free food probably does improve weight gain during treatment, and may improve quality of life but further research is necessary.

We don't know if vitamins reduce death in HIV-negative people but they probably don't work in HIV-positive people with tuberculosis. No studies have assessed whether vitamins improve tuberculosis cure. Vitamins probably don't improve weight gain, and no studies have assessed their effect on quality of life.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Resumo
  7. Resumo para leigos

Nutritional supplements for people being treated for active tuberculosis

Contexte

La tuberculose et la malnutrition sont liées par une relation complexe. L'infection peut provoquer une dénutrition par des besoins métaboliques accrus et des apports réduits, et les carences nutritionnelles peuvent aggraver la maladie ou retarder le rétablissement en diminuant d'importantes fonctions immunitaires. Actuellement, il n'existe pas de conseils nutritionnels fondés sur des preuves pour les adultes et les enfants traités pour une tuberculose.

Objectifs

Evaluer les effets de suppléments nutritionnels oraux (suppléments alimentaires, protéiques/énergétiques ou micro-nutriments) sur les résultats du traitement contre la tuberculose et le rétablissement chez les personnes recevant un traitement aux antituberculeux contre une tuberculose active.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les maladies infectieuses (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, mRCT, et l' Indian Journal of Tuberculosis jusqu'en juillet 2011 et avons vérifié les références bibliographiques de toutes les études incluses.

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés comparant tout supplément nutritionnel oral administré pendant au moins quatre semaines avec une absence d'intervention nutritionnelle, un placebo ou des conseils alimentaires, uniquement pour les personnes traitées pour une tuberculose active.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont sélectionné les essais, extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais de manière indépendante. Les résultats sont présentés sous la forme de risques relatifs (RR) pour les variables dichotomiques et de différences moyennes (DM) pour les variables continues, avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95%. Le cas échéant, les données des essais avec des interventions et des résultats semblables ont été combinées. La qualité des preuves a été évaluée au moyen de l’echelle GRADE.

Résultats principaux

Vingt-trois essais, impliquant 6842 participants, ont été inclus.

Supplémentation en macro-nutriments

Cinq essais ont évalué une supplémentation en micronutriments multiples dans des doses jusqu'à dix fois supérieures à l'apport alimentaire de référence et 12 essais ont évalué une supplémentation d'un ou de deux micronutriments.

Les essais disponibles ont été réalisés à trop petite échelle pour pouvoir prouver ou exclure de manière fiable les bénéfices cliniquement importants en termes de mortalité, de guérison ou d'achèvement du traitement. Un essai à petite échelle mené en Inde a toutefois découvert un bénéfice statistiquement significatif en termes d'achèvement du traitement, ainsi qu'une clairance des bactéries dans les expectorations, mais ces résultats n'ont pas été confirmé par ailleurs par des essais de plus grande taille (preuves de TRES FAIBLE qualité).

La distribution d'aliments ou de produits nutritionnels hautement énergétiques gratuits provoque probablement une légère augmentation de la prise de poids au cours du traitement pour la tuberculose active (preuves de qualité MODEREE). Deux études à petite échelle fournissent des preuves indiquant que la fonction physique et la qualité de vie pourraient également être améliorées, mais les essais sont de taille trop petite pour avoir une grande confiance dans le résultat (preuves de qualité FAIBLE). Ces effets n'ont pas été observés dans l'essai qui incluait uniquement des patients positifs au virus de l'immunodéficience humaine (VIH).

Supplémentation en micronutriments

Cinq essais ont évalué une supplémentation en micronutriments multiples dans des doses jusqu'à dix fois supérieures à l'apport alimentaire de référence et 12 essais ont évalué une supplémentation d'un ou de deux micronutriments.

Les preuves sont insuffisantes pour juger de l'effet bénéfique des micronutriments multiples sur la mortalité chez les patients négatifs au VIH atteints de tuberculose (preuves de qualité TRES FAIBLE), mais les études disponibles montrent que les micronutriments multiples ont probablement peu d'effet, voire pas d'effet sur la mortalité chez les patients positifs au VIH atteints de tuberculose (preuves de qualité MODEREE). Aucune étude n'a évalué les effets des micronutriments multiples sur la guérison ou l'achèvement du traitement.

Les suppléments en micronutriments multiples pourraient avoir peu d'effet, voire pas d'effet sur la proportion des patients tuberculeux restant positifs pour les expectorations au cours des huit premières semaines (preuves de qualité FAIBLE) et n'ont probablement pas d'effet sur la prise de poids au cours du traitement (preuves de qualité MODEREE). Aucune étude n'a évalué la qualité de vie.

Les taux plasmatiques de vitamine A semblent augmenter après le démarrage du traitement de la tuberculose indépendamment de la supplémentation. En revanche, les taux plasmatiques de zinc, de vitamines D et E, et de sélénium pourraient être améliorés par la supplémentation au cours des premiers stades du traitement de la tuberculose, mais il n'a pas été démontré de bénéfice constant pour les résultats du traitement de la tuberculose ou le rétablissement nutritionnel.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les recherches sont insuffisantes pour savoir si la distribution régulière d'aliments ou de suppléments énergétiques gratuits donne de meilleurs résultats pour le traitement de la tuberculose ou une qualité de vie améliorée. Des essais supplémentaires, en particulier dans des zones en situation d'insécurité alimentaire, devraient avoir des tailles d'échantillon adéquates pour identifier ou exclure les bénéfices cliniquement importants.

Bien que les taux sanguins de certaines vitamines puissent être faibles chez les patients démarrant un traitement contre la tuberculose active, il n'y a actuellement aucune preuve fiable indiquant qu'une supplémentation régulière aux quantités ou supérieure aux quantités journalières recommandées présente des bénéfices cliniques.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Resumo
  7. Resumo para leigos

Suppléments nutritionnels pour les personnes traitées pour une tuberculose active

Les chercheurs de la Collaboration Cochrane ont effectué une revue des effets des suppléments nutritionnels pour les personnes traitées pour une tuberculose. Après avoir recherché des études pertinentes, ils ont identifié 23 articles pertinents. Leurs résultats sont résumés ci-dessous.

Qu'est-ce que la tuberculose et comment les suppléments nutritionnels fonctionneraient-ils ?

La tuberculose est une infection bactérienne qui affecte le plus souvent les poumons. La plupart des personnes qui sont infectées ne développent jamais de symptômes, car leur système immunitaire réussit à contrôler les bactéries. La tuberculose active survient lorsque l'infection n'est plus contenue par le système immunitaire et les symptômes classiques sont la toux, les douleurs thoraciques, la fièvre, les sueurs nocturnes, la perte de poids et parfois les crachats de sang. Le traitement consiste en une combinaison de médicaments antibiotiques qui doivent être pris pendant au moins six mois.

Les personnes atteintes de tuberculose souffrent souvent de malnutrition et les personnes souffrant de malnutrition présentent un risque plus élevé de développement de la tuberculose, car leur système immunitaire est affaibli. Les suppléments nutritionnels pourraient aider les personnes à se rétablir de la maladie en renforçant leur système immunitaire et en améliorant la prise de poids et la force musculaire, permettant au patient de prendre une vie active.

Une bonne nutrition nécessite un apport quotidien en macro-nutriments (glucides, protéines et lipides) et en micro-nutriments (vitamines et minéraux essentiels).

Ce que disent les recherches

Effet d'une distribution de suppléments nutritionnels aux personnes traitées pour une tuberculose

Nous ne savons pas, actuellement, si une distribution d'aliments gratuits aux patients tuberculeux, sous la forme de repas chauds ou de colis alimentaires, réduit les décès ou améliore la guérison. Le fait de distribuer des aliments gratuits améliore probablement la prise de poids au cours du traitement et pourrait améliorer la qualité de vie, mais des recherches supplémentaires doivent être menées.

Nous ne savons pas si les vitamines réduisent les décès chez les personnes négatives au VIH, mais elles ne fonctionnent probablement pas chez les personnes positives au VIH atteintes de tuberculose. Aucune étude n'a évalué si les vitamines amélioraient la guérison de la tuberculose. Les vitamines n'améliorent probablement pas la prise de poids et aucune étude n'a évalué leur effet sur la qualité de vie.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st December, 2011
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français

 

Resumo

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Resumo
  7. Resumo para leigos

Suplementos nutricionais para pessoas em tratamento para tuberculose ativa

Introdução

A tuberculose e a má nutrição têm uma relação complexa. A infecção pode causar desnutrição ao aumentar a demanda metabólica e levar à redução da ingestão. Por outro lado, deficiências nutricionais podem agravar a doença ou retardar a recuperação do paciente ao diminuirem a função imune. Atualmente não existem orientações nutricionais baseadas em evidências para adultos e crianças em tratamento para tuberculose ativa.

Objetivos

Avaliar os efeitos de suplementos nutricionais orais (alimentares, suplementos energéticos/de proteína ou micronutrientes) sobre desfechos do tratamento e recuperação de pacientes em uso de medicamentos para o tratamento da tuberculose ativa.

Métodos de busca

Realizamos busca nas seguintes bases de dados: Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (Biblioteca Cochrane), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, mECR e Indian Journal of Tuberculosis até julho de 2011. Verificamos também as listas de referências de todos os estudos incluídos.

Critério de seleção

Ensaios clínicos randomizados (ECRs) comparando qualquer suplemento nutricional oral, administrado por pelo menos quatro semanas, com nenhuma intervenção nutricional, placebo, ou somente com aconselhamento dietético para pessoas em tratamento para tuberculose ativa.

Coleta dos dados e análises

Dois autores selecionaram os estudos, extraíram os dados e avaliaram o risco de viés independentemente. Os resultados foram apresentados como risco relativo (RR) para as variáveis dicotômicas e média das diferenças (MD) para as variáveis contínuas, com intervalo de confiança de 95% (95% CI). Os dados dos estudos com intervenções e desfechos similares foram combinados. A qualidade da evidência foi avaliada usando o método GRADE.

Principais resultados

Foram incluídos 23 estudos, com 6.842 participantes.

Suplementação de macronutrientes

Cinco estudos avaliaram a oferta livre de alimentos ou de suplementos de alta energia. Porém nenhum desses estudos ofereceu um total de quilocalorias por dia acima da ingestão recomendada atualmente para a população não infectada.

Os estudos disponíveis foram muito pequenos para comprovar ou excluir benefícios clinicamente importantes na mortalidade, cura ou término do tratamento. Um pequeno estudo da Índia encontrou benefício estatisticamente importante na taxa de tratamentos completos e no clareamento de bactérias no escarro, mas esses achados não foram confirmados em grandes estudos em outros locais (evidência de MUITO BAIXA qualidade).

A livre oferta de alimentos ou de suplementos nutricionais de alta energia provavelmente produz um discreto aumento no ganho de peso durante o tratamento para tuberculose ativa (evidência de MODERADA qualidade). Dois pequenos estudos forneceram alguma evidência de que pode haver melhora na função física e na qualidade de vida, mas os estudos são muito pequenos para permitir maior confiança nos resultados (evidência de BAIXA qualidade). Esses efeitos não foram observados em um estudo que incluiu somente pacientes portadores do vírus da imunodeficiência humana (HIV).

Suplementação micronutrientes

Cinco estudos avaliaram suplementação com múltiplos micronutrientes em doses até 10 vezes maiores do que as recomendadas, e 12 estudos avaliaram suplementação com um ou dois micronutrientes.

Há evidência insuficiente para saber se o uso de micronutrientes múltiplos teria algum efeito benéfico na mortalidade em pacientes HIV-negativos com tuberculose (evidência de MUITO BAIXA qualidade). Porém, os estudos disponíveis mostram que o uso de micronutrientes múltiplos teria pequeno ou nenhum efeito na mortalidade em pacientes HIV-positivos com tuberculose (evidência de MODERADA qualidade). Nenhum estudo avaliou os efeitos de micronutrientes múltiplos na cura ou finalização do tratamento.

Suplementos commicronutrientes múltiplos podem ter pequeno ou nenhum efeito na proporção de pacientes tuberculosos que permanecem com escarro positivo durante as primeiras oito semanas (evidência de BAIXA qualidade), e provavelmente não têm efeito no ganho de peso durante o tratamento (evidência de MODERADA qualidade). Nenhum estudo avaliou a qualidade de vida.

Os níveis plasmáticos de vitamina A parecem aumentar com o início do tratamento da tuberculose, independentemente da suplementação. Por outro lado, os níveis plasmáticos de zinco, vitaminas D e E e selênio podem melhorar com a suplementação durante os estágios precoces do tratamento da tuberculose, mas benefícios consistentes nos resultados do tratamento ou recuperação nutricional não foram demonstrados.

Conclusão dos autores

Os estudos são insuficientes para mostrar se o uso rotineiro de alimentos ou de suplementos energéticos sem custos traz melhores resultados no tratamento da tuberculose ou melhora a qualidade de vida. Mais estudos, particularmente em ambiente de insegurança alimentar, com tamanho amostral adequado, são necessários para identificar ou excluir, benefícios clínicos importantes.

Embora os níveis sanguíneos de algumas vitaminas podem estar baixos em pacientes que iniciam tratamento para tuberculose ativa, não há atualmente evidência confiável de que a suplementação de rotina ou acima das quantidades recomendadas têm benefícios clínicos.

Notas de tradução

Tradução do Centro Cochrane do Brasil (José Carlos Souza)

 

Resumo para leigos

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Resumo
  7. Resumo para leigos

Suplementos nutricionais para pessoas em tratamento para tuberculose ativa

Pesquisadores da Cochrane Collaboration realizaram uma revisão dos efeitos de suplementos nutricionais para pessoas iniciando tratamento para tuberculose. Eles identificaram 23 artigos relevantes. Seus achados estão resumidos abaixo.

O que é tuberculose e como o suplemento nutricional funciona?

A tuberculose é uma infecção bacteriana que afeta mais frequentemente os pulmões. A maioria das pessoas que se infectam nunca desenvolve sintomas, já que seu sistema imune consegue controlar as bactérias. A tuberculose ativa ocorre quando a infecção não é contida pelo sistema imunológico; os sintomas típicos são tosse, dor no peito, febre, suor noturno, perda de peso e, algumas vezes, tosse com sangue. O tratamento é feito com uma combinação de antibióticos que devem ser tomados por pelo menos seis meses.

Pessoas com tuberculose são frequentemente desnutridas, e pessoas desnutridas têm alto risco de desenvolverem tuberculose porque seus sistemas imunes estão enfraquecidos. Os suplementos nutricionais poderiam ajudar as pessoas a se recuperarem da doença. Isso ocorreria porque poderiam fortalecer o sistema imune do paciente, melhorar seu ganho de peso e força muscular, permitindo, assim, que ele retome uma vida ativa.

Uma boa nutrição requer ingestão diária de macronutrientes (carboidratos, proteínas e gorduras) e micronutrientes (vitaminas e minerais).

O que as pesquisas dizem

Os efeitos do fornecimento de suplementos nutricionais para pessoas em tratamento para tuberculose

Nós atualmente não sabemos se o fornecimento grátis de comida para pacientes tuberculosos, na forma de refeições quentes ou cartões de racionamento, reduz seus riscos de morrer ou melhora suas chances de cura. Oferecer comida grátis provavelmente ajuda no ganho de peso durante o tratamento e pode melhorar a qualidade de vida, mas mais pesquisas são necessárias para esclarecer isso.

Nós não sabemos se o uso de vitaminas reduz o risco de morte em pessoas HIV-negativas, mas provavelmente não funciona em pessoas HIV-positivas com tuberculose. Nenhum estudo avaliou se o uso de vitaminas melhora as chances de cura da tuberculose. O uso de vitaminas provavelmente não melhora o ganho de peso, e não existem estudos avaliando seus efeitos sobre a qualidade de vida.

Notas de tradução

Tradução do Centro Cochrane do Brasil (José Carlos Souza)