Intervention Review

Antibiotics for clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis in adults

  1. Marieke B Lemiengre1,*,
  2. Mieke L van Driel1,2,3,
  3. Dan Merenstein4,
  4. James Young5,
  5. An IM De Sutter1,6

Editorial Group: Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections Group

Published Online: 17 OCT 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 2 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006089.pub4


How to Cite

Lemiengre MB, van Driel ML, Merenstein D, Young J, De Sutter AIM. Antibiotics for clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD006089. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006089.pub4.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Ghent University, Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, Ghent, Belgium

  2. 2

    The University of Queensland, Discipline of General Practice, School of Medicine, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

  3. 3

    Bond University, Centre for Research in Evidence-Based Practice, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia

  4. 4

    Georgetown University Medical Center, Department of Family Medicine, Washington, DC, USA

  5. 5

    University Hospital Basel, Basel Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Basel, Switzerland

  6. 6

    Ghent University, Heymans Institute of Pharmacology, Ghent, Belgium

*Marieke B Lemiengre, Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, Ghent University, 6K3, De Pintelaan 185, Ghent, 9000, Belgium. marieke.lemiengre@ugent.be.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 17 OCT 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

In primary care settings, the diagnosis of rhinosinusitis is generally based on clinical signs and symptoms. Technical investigations are not routinely performed, nor recommended. Individual trials show a trend in favour of antibiotics, but the balance of benefit versus harm is unclear.

Objectives

To assess the effect of antibiotics in adults with clinically diagnosed rhinosinusitis in primary care settings.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2012), MEDLINE (January 1950 to February week 4, 2012) and EMBASE (January 1974 to February 2012).

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of antibiotics versus placebo in participants with rhinosinusitis-like signs or symptoms.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. We contacted trial authors for additional information. We collected information on adverse effects from the trials.

Main results

We included 10 trials involving 2450 participants. Overall, the risk of bias in these studies was low. Irrespective of the treatment group, 47% of participants were cured after one week and 71% after 14 days. Antibiotics can shorten the time to cure, but only five more participants per 100 will cure faster at any time point between 7 and 14 days if they receive antibiotics instead of placebo (number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB)) 18 (95% confidence interval (CI) 10 to 115, I2 statistic 0%, eight trials). Purulent secretion resolves faster with antibiotics (odds ratio (OR) 1.58 (95% CI 1.13 to 2.22)), (NNTB 11, 95% CI 6 to 51, I2 statistic 0%, three trials). However, 27% of the participants who received antibiotics and 15% of those who received placebo experienced adverse events (OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.60 to 2.77) (number needed to treat to harm (NNTH)) 8 (95% CI 6 to 13, I2 statistic 13%, seven trials). More participants in the placebo group needed to start antibiotic therapy because of an abnormal course of rhinosinusitis (OR 0.49, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.66), NNTH 20 (95% CI 14 to 35, I2 statistic 0%, eight trials). Only one disease-related complication (brain abscess) occurred in a patient treated with antibiotics.

Authors' conclusions

The potential benefit of antibiotics in the treatment of clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis needs to be seen in the context of a high prevalence of adverse events. Taking into account antibiotic resistance and the very low incidence of serious complications, we conclude that there is no place for antibiotics for the patient with clinically diagnosed, uncomplicated acute rhinosinusitis. This review cannot make recommendations for children, patients with a suppressed immune system and patients with severe disease, as these populations were not included in the available trials.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Antibiotics for clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis in adults

Acute rhinosinusitis is a common condition that involves blockage of the nose passage and mucus in the sinuses. The diagnosis of acute rhinosinusitis in this review is based on clinical symptoms only, i.e. purulent discharge from the nose or other rhinosinusitis-like symptoms, such as unilateral facial pain or pressure, pain when bending forward, pain in the upper teeth or when chewing, and post-nasal drip. It is often caused by a viral upper respiratory tract infection of which only 0.5% to 2% of cases are estimated to be complicated by a bacterial rhinosinusitis. Nevertheless, antibiotics (used to treat bacterial infections) are often prescribed. Unnecessary prescribing contributes to antimicrobial resistance in the community. Therefore, in order to provide clinicians and patients with evidence-based guidance for management, it is important to assess the effect of antibiotics in acute rhinosinusitis.

We found 10 trials with a low risk of bias involving 2450 participants. Overall, about half of all participants were cured after one week with antibiotic or placebo treatment and three-quarters were cured after 14 days. Antibiotics can shorten the time to cure, but only five more participants per 100 will cure faster after 7 to 14 days if they receive antibiotics instead of placebo, or 18 participants will need to be treated with antibiotics for one extra patient to be cured more quickly. However, for every eight patients treated with antibiotics one patient experiences an adverse event caused by the treatment. The rate of serious complications was very low in both the placebo and antibiotic treatment groups.

Given the lack of clear benefit in terms of rapid recovery and the increase in side effects in participants treated with antibiotics, antibiotics are not recommended as first line treatment in adults with clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis. This review cannot make recommendations for treatment of children, patients with a suppressed immune system and patients with severe disease as these populations were not included in the available trials. More studies are needed to identify which patients might benefit from antibiotics.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les antibiotiques pour le traitement de la rhinosinusite aiguë diagnostiquée cliniquement chez les adultes

Contexte

Lors des consultations chez le médecin généraliste, le diagnostic de rhinosinusite repose généralement sur des symptômes et des signes cliniques. Des investigations techniques ne sont pas systématiquement effectuées ni recommandées. Les essais individuels affichent une tendance en faveur des antibiotiques, mais le bilan effets bénéfiques versus délétères n'est pas clairement établi.

Objectifs

Evaluer l'effet des antibiotiques chez des adultes atteints d'une rhinosinusite diagnostiquée cliniquement lors d'une consultation chez le généraliste.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library numéro 2 de 2012), MEDLINE (Janvier 1950 à la semaine 4 de février 2012) et EMBASE (Janvier 1974 à février 2012).

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) d'antibiotiques versus placebo chez les participants atteints de signes ou de symptômes pseudo-rhinosinusiens.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais de manière indépendante. Nous avons contacté les auteurs des essais pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires. Nous avons recueilli les informations sur les effets indésirables figurant dans les essais.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 10 essais portant sur 2 450 participants. Globalement, dans ces études, le risque de biais était faible. Quel que soit le groupe de traitement, 47 % des participants ont été guéris au bout d'une semaine et 71 % au bout de 14 jours. Les antibiotiques peuvent accélérer la guérison, mais seulement cinq participants supplémentaires sur 100 seront guéris plus rapidement à tout point temporel entre 7 et 14 jours, s'ils reçoivent des antibiotiques au lieu d'un placebo (nombre de sujets à traiter pour observer un bénéfice (NSTb)) : 18 (intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % : 10 à 115, statistiques I2 : 0 %, huit essais). Les sécrétions purulentes disparaissent plus rapidement avec des antibiotiques (odds ratio (OR) = 1,58 (IC à 95 % : 1,13 à 2,22)), (NSTb = 11, IC à 95 % : 6 à 51, statistiques I2 : 0 %, trois essais). Toutefois, 27 % des participants ayant reçu des antibiotiques et 15 % de ceux ayant reçu un placebo ont présenté des événements indésirables (OR = 2,10, IC à 95 % : 1,60 à 2,77) (nombre de sujets à traiter pour observer un bénéfice (NSTb)) : 8 (IC à 95 % : 6 à 13, statistiques I2 : 13 %, sept essais). Davantage de participants du groupe placebo ont dû démarrer une antibiothérapie en raison d'une évolution anormale de la rhinosinusite (OR = 0,49, IC à 95 % : 0,36 à 0,66), nombre de sujets à traiter pour observer un effet indésirable du traitement (NNTH) : 20 (IC à 95 % : 14 à 35, statistiques I2 : 0%, huit essais). Une seule complication liée à la maladie (abcès cérébral) a été observée chez un patient traité avec des antibiotiques.

Conclusions des auteurs

Le bénéfice potentiel des antibiotiques dans le traitement de la rhinosinusite aiguë cliniquement diagnostiquée doit être considéré dans le contexte d'une forte prévalence d'événements indésirables. Compte tenu de la résistance aux antibiotiques et de la très faible incidence de complications graves, nous concluons que l'antibiothérapie n'a pas sa place chez les patients atteints d'une rhinosinusite aiguë non compliquée, diagnostiquée cliniquement. Cette revue n'est pas en mesure de formuler des recommandations pour les enfants, les patients ayant un système immunitaire affaibli et les patients atteints d'une pathologie sévère, car ces populations n'étaient pas incluses dans les essais disponibles.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les antibiotiques pour le traitement de la rhinosinusite aiguë diagnostiquée cliniquement chez les adultes

Les antibiotiques pour le traitement de la rhinosinusite aiguë diagnostiquée cliniquement chez les adultes

La rhinosinusite aiguë est une pathologie fréquente caractérisée par une obstruction nasale et la présence de mucus dans les sinus. Le diagnostic de rhinosinusite aiguë dans cette revue repose uniquement sur les symptômes cliniques, à savoir des sécrétions nasales purulentes ou d'autres symptômes pseudo-rhinosinusiens, tels qu'une douleur ou une pression faciale unilatérale, une douleur en se penchant en avant, une douleur dentaire supérieure ou lors de la mastication et un écoulement nasal postérieur. Elle est souvent provoquée par une infection virale des voies respiratoires supérieures, à partir de laquelle on estime la survenue d'une rhinosinusite bactérienne dans seulement 0,5 % à 2 % des cas. Néanmoins, les antibiotiques (utilisés pour traiter les infections bactériennes) sont souvent prescrits. Les prescriptions inutiles contribuent à la résistance aux antimicrobiens d'origine communautaire. C'est pourquoi, il est important d'évaluer l'effet des antibiotiques dans la rhinosinusite aiguë afin de fournir aux cliniciens et aux patients des directives fondées pour sa prise en charge.

Nous avons trouvé 10 essais présentant un faible risque de biais portant sur 2450 participants. Globalement, environ la moitié des participants ont été guéris après une semaine de traitement sous antibiotique ou placebo et les trois quarts ont été guéris au bout de 14 jours. Les antibiotiques peuvent accélérer la guérison, mais seulement cinq participants supplémentaires sur 100 seront guéris plus rapidement après 7 à 14 jours, s'ils reçoivent des antibiotiques au lieu d'un placebo ou 18 participants devront être traités avec des antibiotiques pour qu'un patient supplémentaire soit guéri plus rapidement. Toutefois, sur huit patients traités avec des antibiotiques, un patient présente un effet indésirable lié au traitement. Le taux de complications graves s'est avéré très faible à la fois dans le groupe sous placebo et dans le groupe sous antibiothérapie.

Compte tenu de l'absence d'effet bénéfique évident en termes de rétablissement rapide et de l'augmentation des effets secondaires chez les participants traités avec des antibiotiques, les antibiotiques ne sont pas recommandés comme traitement de première ligne chez les adultes atteints de rhinosinusite aiguë diagnostiquée cliniquement. Cette revue n'est pas en mesure de formuler des recommandations pour le traitement des enfants, des patients ayant un système immunitaire affaibli et des patients atteints d'une pathologie sévère, car ces populations n'étaient pas incluses dans les essais disponibles. Des études supplémentaires sont nécessaires afin d'identifier les patients qui pourraient bénéficier d'un traitement antibiotique.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 2nd November, 2012
Traduction financée par: Minist�re des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�