Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Interventions for treating traumatised permanent front teeth: luxated (dislodged) teeth

  1. Flavia M Belmonte1,
  2. Cristiane R Macedo2,*,
  3. Peter F Day3,
  4. Humberto Saconato4,
  5. Virginia Fernandes Moça Trevisani5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Oral Health Group

Published Online: 30 APR 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 20 AUG 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006203.pub2


How to Cite

Belmonte FM, Macedo CR, Day PF, Saconato H, Fernandes Moça Trevisani V. Interventions for treating traumatised permanent front teeth: luxated (dislodged) teeth. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD006203. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006203.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Internal and Therapeutic Medicine, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

  2. 2

    Centro de Estudos de Medicina Baseada em Evidências e Avaliação Tecnológica em Saúde, Brazilian Cochrane Centre, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

  3. 3

    Leeds Dental Institute, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Leeds, UK

  4. 4

    Santa Casa de Campo Mourão, Department of Medicine, Campo Mourão, Campo Mourão, Brazil

  5. 5

    Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rheumatology/Internal Medicine and Therapeutics, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

*Cristiane R Macedo, Brazilian Cochrane Centre, Centro de Estudos de Medicina Baseada em Evidências e Avaliação Tecnológica em Saúde, Rua Borges Lagoa 564 cj 63, São Paulo, São Paulo, CEP 04038-000, Brazil. crisrufa@uol.com.br.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Stable (no update expected for reasons given in 'What's new')
  2. Published Online: 30 APR 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Dental trauma is common especially in children and young adults. One group of dento-alveolar injuries is classified as luxation. This group includes a subgroup of severe injuries where the tooth is displaced from its original position. These injuries are classified further by the direction in which the tooth has been displaced, namely: intrusion, extrusion and lateral luxation.

Objectives

To evaluate the effects of a range of interventions for treating displaced luxated permanent front teeth.

Search methods

Search strategies were developed for MEDLINE via OVID and revised appropriately for the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 20 August 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 8), MEDLINE via OVID (1966 to August 2012), EMBASE via Elsevier (1974 to August 2012), and LILACS via BIREME (1982 to August 2012). Dissertations, Theses and Abstracts were searched as were reference lists from articles. There were no language restrictions.

Selection criteria

Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of treatment interventions for displaced luxated permanent front teeth. Included trials had to have a minimum follow-up period of 12 months.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently and in duplicate assessed the eligibility of all reports identified in the searches. Authors were contacted for additional information where required.

Main results

No randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials were found.

Authors' conclusions

We found no randomised or quasi-randomised trials of interventions to treat displaced luxated permanent front teeth. Current clinical guidelines are based on available information from case series studies and expert opinions. Randomised controlled trials in this area of dental trauma are required to robustly identify the benefits of different treatment strategies.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions for treating traumatised permanent front teeth: luxated (dislodged) front teeth

Traumatic injuries to upper front teeth in children and young adults are common. The Cochrane Oral Health Group conducted this review to look at interventions to treat the front permanent (adult) tooth or teeth when they have been displaced from their original position following injury. This review does not include teeth that have been completely knocked out (avulsion).

The latest search of relevant studies was carried out on 20th August 2012.

There are various causes of this kind of traumatic injury including falls, blows, accidents and assaults. Studies have shown that the majority of cases involve boys and young men (60% to 70%).

There are three main kinds of displacement.

- Lateral, where the tooth has been forced sideways (either back or forwards) in the socket and is immobile.
- Extrusion, where the tooth has become loosened and begins to come out of the socket.
- Intrusion, where the tooth has been forced into the bone of the jaw.

After the injury, the teeth may be repositioned into their original position or allowed to spontaneously return to their original position (appropriate for some types of intrusion injury). Repositioning can be undertaken either manually by the dentist or using orthodontic braces. Once the tooth is returned to its original position, splinting may be used to maintain its position. A large variety of splinting techniques have been reported in the literature. An ideal splint should be passive (i.e. it should not cause the tooth to move away from its original position), allow physiological movement (e.g. allow very minor movements of the tooth while maintaining its original position) and be simple to handle during application and removal. From the patient's perspective, the splint should not interfere with biting, cleaning or speech. The length of time the splint should stay in position depends on the injury, the mobility of the tooth and the tissues affected. The injured tooth or teeth will then require long term (at least 12 months) monitoring to assess healing, particularly of the gum and soft tissues around the tooth and crucially the pulp inside it which keeps the tooth alive. Where indicated (i.e. if the pulp inside the tooth dies), further treatment may be required such as root canal treatment.

This Cochrane review investigated what treatments are beneficial for these kinds of injuries including:

- the role of antibiotics and their different types;
- the role of splints, their differing types, and the optimum length of time for their use; and
- the role of repositioning techniques (e.g. the use of orthodontic braces or surgery).

Out of 548 studies identified in the search, no studies were found which met the inclusion criteria. There is therefore no high quality evidence available on which to base an assessment of interventions to treat these injuries. Current treatment guidelines are based on studies with a greater risk of bias using study designs such as case series, animal studies and laboratory-based cellular studies. High quality studies are therefore urgently needed.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour le traitement des dents antérieures définitives ayant subi un traumatisme : luxation des dents (déplacement)

Contexte

Les traumatismes dentaires sont courants surtout chez les enfants et les jeunes adultes. Un groupe de traumatismes alvéolo-dentaires est classé dans les luxations. Ce groupe inclut un sous-groupe de traumatismes graves où la dent est déplacée hors de sa position d'origine. Ces traumatismes sont en outre classés en fonction de la direction dans laquelle la dent s'est déplacée, notamment : ingression, égression et luxation latérale.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets d'une série d'interventions pour le traitement des dents antérieures définitives déplacées ayant subi une luxation.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Des stratégies de recherche ont été développées pour MEDLINE via OVID et modifiées de façon appropriée pour les bases de données suivantes : le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire (jusqu’au 20.08.12), le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library2012, Numéro 8), MEDLINE via OVID (de 1966 jusqu'au mois d'août 2012), EMBASE via Elsevier (de 1974 jusqu'au mois d'août 2012) et LILACS via BIREME (de 1982 jusqu'au mois d'août 2012). Les thèses de doctorat, les thèses et les résumés ont fait l'objet de recherches, de même que les références bibliographiques d'articles. Il n'y avait aucune restriction concernant la langue.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés ou quasi-randomisés portant sur les interventions thérapeutiques pour les dents antérieures définitives déplacées ayant subi une luxation. Les essais inclus devaient comprendre une période de suivi minimale de 12 mois.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de cette revue ont évalué de manière indépendante et à deux reprises l'éligibilité de tous les comptes-rendus identifiés à l'issue des recherches. Le cas échéant, des auteurs d'études ont été contactés afin d'obtenir des informations complémentaires.

Résultats Principaux

Aucun essai contrôlé randomisé ou quasi-randomisé n'a été trouvé.

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous n'avons trouvé aucun essai contrôlé randomisé ou quasi-randomisé portant sur des interventions pour le traitement des dents antérieures définitives déplacées ayant subi une luxation. Les directives cliniques actuelles sont fondées sur des informations disponibles dans des études de séries de cas et des avis d'experts. Il est nécessaire de réaliser des essais contrôlés randomisés abordant ce domaine de traumatismes dentaires afin d'identifier de façon irréfutable les bénéfices des différentes stratégies de traitement.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour le traitement des dents antérieures définitives ayant subi un traumatisme : luxation des dents (déplacement)

Interventions pour le traitement des dents antérieures définitives ayant subi un traumatisme : luxation des dents antérieures (déplacement)

Les lésions traumatiques des dents antérieures supérieures chez les enfants et les jeunes adultes sont courantes. Le groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire a effectué cette revue pour examiner les interventions visant à traiter la dent ou les dents antérieures définitives (adultes) quand elles ont été déplacées de leur position d'origine suite à une blessure. Cette revue n'inclut pas les dents qui ont été entièrement luxées (avulsion).

Les dernières recherches d'études pertinentes ont été réalisées le 20 août 2012.

Les causes de ce type de traumatismes sont diverses et comprennent notamment les chutes, les coups, les accidents et les agressions. Les études ont montré que la majorité des cas impliquent les garçons et les jeunes hommes (60 % à 70 %).

Il existe trois grands types de déplacement.

- Déplacement latéral, quand la dent a été poussée latéralement (soit en arrière soit en avant) dans l'alvéole et est immobile.
- Égression, quand la dent s'est relâchée et commence à sortir de l'alvéole.
- Ingression (luxation par enfoncement), quand la dent s'est enfoncée dans l'os de la mâchoire.

Après le traumatisme, les dents peuvent être repositionnées dans leur position d'origine ou laissées revenir spontanément dans leur position d'origine (choix approprié pour certains types de traumatisme par ingression). Le repositionnement peut être effectué soit manuellement par le dentiste soit en utilisant des appareils orthodontiques. Dès que la dent est revenue dans sa position d'origine, on peut utiliser des attelles de contention pour la maintenir dans sa position. Un grand nombre de techniques de contention ont été rapportées dans la littérature. Une attelle de contention idéale doit être passive (c'est-à-dire qu'elle ne doit pas causer le déplacement de la dent hors de sa position d'origine), permettre un mouvement physiologique (par exemple permettre des mouvements très mineurs de la dent tout en la maintenant dans sa position d'origine) et être simple à manier pendant l'application et le retrait. Du point de vue du patient, l'attelle de contention ne doit pas perturber la mastication, le nettoyage ou la parole. La durée pendant laquelle l'attelle de contention doit rester en position dépend du traumatisme, de la mobilité de la dent et des tissus affectés. La dent ou les dents atteintes nécessitent ensuite une surveillance à long terme (au moins pendant 12 mois) pour évaluer la guérison, notamment de la gencive et des tissus mous autour de la dent et surtout de la pulpe dentaire à l'intérieur qui garde la dent en vie. En cas d'indication (c'est-à-dire si la pulpe dentaire à l'intérieur de la dent meurt), un traitement supplémentaire peut s'avérer nécessaire, par exemple un traitement canalaire.

Cette revue Cochrane a étudié les traitements qui sont bénéfiques pour ces types de traumatismes incluant notamment :

- le rôle des antibiotiques et leurs différents types ;
- le rôle des attelles de contention, leurs différents types, et la durée optimale de leur utilisation ; et
- le rôle des techniques de repositionnement (par exemple l'utilisation des appareils orthodontiques ou la chirurgie).

Parmi les 548 études identifiées à l'issue de la recherche, aucune étude remplissant les critères d'inclusion n'a été trouvée. Il n'existe, par conséquent, aucune preuve de grande qualité sur laquelle nous pourrions fonder une évaluation des interventions visant à traiter ces traumatismes. Les directives de traitement actuelles sont fondées sur des études présentant un risque plus élevé de biais utilisant des schémas d'étude tels que des séries de cas, des études animales et des études cellulaires menées en laboratoire. Il est donc urgent de réaliser des études de grande qualité.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 11th March, 2014
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.