Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Interventions for preventing weight gain after smoking cessation

  1. Amanda C Farley1,
  2. Peter Hajek2,
  3. Deborah Lycett1,
  4. Paul Aveyard1,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group

Published Online: 18 JAN 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 7 OCT 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006219.pub3


How to Cite

Farley AC, Hajek P, Lycett D, Aveyard P. Interventions for preventing weight gain after smoking cessation. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD006219. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006219.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Birmingham, Primary Care Clinical Sciences, Birmingham, West Midlands, UK

  2. 2

    Queen Mary's School of Medicine and Dentistry, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, London, UK

*Paul Aveyard, Primary Care Clinical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, West Midlands, B15 2TT, UK. p.n.aveyard@bham.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 18 JAN 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Most people who stop smoking gain weight. There are some interventions that have been designed to reduce weight gain when stopping smoking. Some smoking cessation interventions may also limit weight gain although their effect on weight has not been reviewed.

Objectives

To systematically review the effect of: (1) Interventions targeting post-cessation weight gain on weight change and smoking cessation.

(2) Interventions designed to aid smoking cessation that may also plausibly affect weight on post-cessation weight change.

Search methods

Part 1 - We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group's Specialized Register and CENTRAL in September 2011.

Part 2 - In addition we searched the included studies in the following "parent" Cochrane reviews: nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), antidepressants, nicotine receptor partial agonists, cannabinoid type 1 receptor antagonists and exercise interventions for smoking cessation published in Issue 9, 2011 of the Cochrane Library.

Selection criteria

Part 1 - We included trials of interventions that were targeted at post-cessation weight gain and had measured weight at any follow up point and/or smoking cessation six or more months after quit day.

Part 2 - We included trials that had been included in the selected parent Cochrane reviews if they had reported weight gain at any time point.

Data collection and analysis

We extracted data on baseline characteristics of the study population, intervention, outcome and study quality. Change in weight was expressed as difference in weight change from baseline to follow up between trial arms and was reported in abstinent smokers only. Abstinence from smoking was expressed as a risk ratio (RR). We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence available in each trial. Where appropriate, we performed meta-analysis using the inverse variance method for weight and Mantel-Haenszel method for smoking using a fixed-effect model.

Main results

Part 1: Some pharmacological interventions tested for limiting post cessation weight gain (PCWG) resulted in a significant reduction in WG at the end of treatment (dexfenfluramine (Mean difference (MD) -2.50 kg, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.98 to -2.02, 1 study), phenylpropanolamine (MD -0.50 kg, 95% CI -0.80 to -0.20, N=3), naltrexone (MD -0.78 kg, 95% CI -1.52 to -0.05, N=2). There was no evidence that treatment reduced weight at 6 or 12 months (m). No pharmacological intervention significantly affected smoking cessation rates.

Weight management education only was associated with no reduction in PCWG at end of treatment (6 or 12m). However these interventions significantly reduced abstinence at 12m (Risk ratio (RR) 0.66, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.90, N=2). Personalised weight management support reduced PCWG at 12m (MD -2.58 kg, 95% CI -5.11 to -0.05, N=2) and was not associated with a significant reduction of abstinence at 12m (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.39 to 1.43, N=2). A very low calorie diet (VLCD) significantly reduced PCWG at end of treatment (MD -3.70 kg, 95% CI -4.82 to -2.58, N=1), but not significantly so at 12m (MD -1.30 kg, 95% CI -3.49 to 0.89, N=1). The VLCD increased chances of abstinence at 12m (RR 1.73, 95% CI 1.10 to 2.73, N=1). There was no evidence that cognitive behavioural therapy to allay concern about weight gain (CBT) reduced PCWG, but there was some evidence of increased PCWG at 6m (MD 0.74, 95% CI 0.24 to 1.24). It was associated with improved abstinence at 6m (RR 1.83, 95% CI 1.07 to 3.13, N=2) but not at 12m (RR 1.25, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.86, N=2). However, there was significant statistical heterogeneity.

Part 2: We found no evidence that exercise interventions significantly reduced PCWG at end of treatment (MD -0.25 kg, 95% CI -0.78 to 0.29, N=4) however a significant reduction was found at 12m (MD -2.07 kg, 95% CI -3.78 to -0.36, N=3).

Both bupropion and fluoxetine limited PCWG at the end of treatment (bupropion MD -1.12 kg, 95% CI -1.47 to -0.77, N=7) (fluoxetine MD -0.99 kg, 95% CI -1.36 to -0.61, N=2). There was no evidence that the effect persisted at 6m (bupropion MD -0.58 kg, 95% CI -2.16 to 1.00, N=4), (fluoxetine MD -0.01 kg, 95% CI -1.11 to 1.10, N=2) or 12m (bupropion MD -0.38 kg, 95% CI -2.00 to 1.24, N=4). There were no data on WG at 12m for fluoxetine.

Overall, treatment with NRT attenuated PCWG at the end of treatment (MD -0.69 kg, 95% CI -0.88 to -0.51, N=19), with no strong evidence that the effect differed for the different forms of NRT. There was evidence of significant statistical heterogeneity caused by one study which reported a 4.3 kg reduction in PCWG due to NRT. With this study removed, the difference in weight change at end of treatment was -0.45 kg (95% CI -0.66 to -0.27, N=18). There was no evidence of an effect on PCWG at 12m (MD -0.42 kg, 95% CI -0.92 to 0.08, N=15).

We found evidence that varenicline significantly reduced PCWG at end of treatment (MD -0.41 kg, 95% CI -0.63 to -0.19, N=11), but this effect was not maintained at 6 or 12m. Three studies compared the effect of bupropion to varenicline. Participants taking bupropion gained significantly less weight at the end of treatment (-0.51 kg (95% CI -0.93 to -0.09 kg), N=3). Direct comparison showed no significant difference in PCWG between varenicline and NRT.

Authors' conclusions

Although some pharmacotherapies tested to limit PCWG show evidence of short-term success, other problems with them and the lack of data on long-term efficacy limits their use. Weight management education only, is not effective and may reduce abstinence. Personalised weight management support may be effective and not reduce abstinence, but there are too few data to be sure. One study showed a VLCD increased abstinence but did not prevent WG in the longer term. CBT to accept WG did not limit PCWG and may not promote abstinence in the long term. Exercise interventions significantly reduced weight in the long term, but not the short term. More studies are needed to clarify whether this is an effect of treatment or a chance finding. Bupropion, fluoxetine, NRT and varenicline reduce PCWG while using the medication. Although this effect was not maintained one year after stopping smoking, the evidence is insufficient to exclude a modest long-term effect. The data are not sufficient to make strong clinical recommendations for effective programmes to prevent weight gain after cessation.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions for preventing weight gain after smoking cessation

When giving up smoking, most people put on weight. Many smokers are concerned about this and say it may put them off making an attempt quit. Some studies show that weight gain also leads to people resuming smoking after an initially successful quit attempt. On the other hand, there are good reasons to believe that trying to limit weight gain may reduce the chance of stopping smoking. Several drug and behavioural programmes to limit post cessation weight gain have been tested. Of the drug treatments, naltrexone showed the most promise, but there were no data on its effects on weight once drug treatment stopped and there was not enough evidence to judge its effects on long term quitting. Weight management education alone did not limit weight gain and may undermine cessation. Weight management education with personalised support giving feedback on personal goals and a personal energy prescription limited weight gain and there was no evidence that it undermined cessation. Intermittent use of a VLCD improved cessation success and weight gain in the short term but not in the longer term.

Some smoking cessation treatments also limited weight gain. Bupropion, fluoxetine, NRT and varenicline all limited weight gain during treatment, however the effects on weight gain reduction were smaller after the treatment had stopped and there was insufficient evidence to be sure that these effects persisted in the long-term. There was some evidence to suggest that exercise reduced post cessation weight gain but more studies are needed to clarify whether this was a chance finding. The effects of all interventions were modest in relation to the average weight gain that follows stopping smoking.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour éviter la prise de poids après un sevrage tabagique

Contexte

La majorité des personnes qui arrêtent de fumer prennent du poids. Certaines interventions ont été élaborées afin de réduire la prise de poids lors d'un sevrage tabagique. Certaines interventions utilisées pour le sevrage tabagique peuvent aussi limiter la prise de poids, bien que ces effets n'aient pas été contrôlés.

Objectifs

Évaluer systématiquement les effets des : (1) Interventions ciblant la prise de poids après un sevrage en termes de variation pondérale et de sevrage tabagique.

(2) Interventions destinées à faciliter le sevrage tabagique, mais pouvant aussi éventuellement influer sur le poids en termes de variation pondérale après le sevrage.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Partie 1 - Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur le tabagisme et CENTRAL en septembre 2011.

Partie 2 - Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans les études incluses dans les revues Cochrane « parentes » suivantes : traitement de substitution à la nicotine (TSN), antidépresseurs, agonistes partiels des récepteurs nicotiniques, antagonistes des récepteurs cannabinoïdes de type 1 et interventions incluant des exercices de sevrage tabagique publiés dans le numéro 9 en 2011 de la Cochrane Library.

Critères de sélection

Partie 1 - Nous avons inclus des essais portant sur des interventions qui étaient ciblées lors de la prise de poids après un sevrage et qui avaient mesuré le poids à chaque suivi et/ou sevrage tabagique six mois, voire plus, après le jour d'abandon du tabagisme.

Partie 2 - Nous avons inclus des essais qui avaient été inclus dans les revues Cochrane parentes sélectionnées à condition qu'ils aient signalé une prise de poids quelque soit le point temporel.

Recueil et analyse des données

Nous avons extrait des données en fonction des caractéristiques de base de la population, de l'intervention, du résultat et de la qualité de l'étude. Les variations pondérales étaient exprimées sous la forme de différences entre les valeurs de référence et celles de suivi dans les différents bras des essais et étaient uniquement signalées chez les fumeurs en sevrage. L'abstinence tabagique était exprimée sous la forme d'un risque relatif (RR). Nous avons utilisé la définition la plus rigoureuse de l'abstinence dans chaque essai. Le cas échéant, nous avons procédé à une méta-analyse en utilisant la méthode de l'inverse de la variance pour le poids et la méthode Mantel-Haenszel pour le tabagisme en utilisant un modèle à effets fixes.

Résultats principaux

Partie 1 : Certaines interventions pharmacologiques testées en termes de limitation de prise de poids après un sevrage (PPAS) engendraient une baisse significative de la PP à la fin du traitement (dexfenfluramine (différence moyenne (MD) - 2,50  kg, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % - 2,98 à - 2,02, 1 étude), phénylpropanolamine (DM - 0,50  kg, IC à 95 % - 0,80 à - 0,20, N = 3), naltréxone (DM - 0,78  kg, IC à 95 % - 1,52 à - 0,05, N = 2). Aucune preuve n'a démontré que ce traitement réduisait la prise de poids au bout de 6 ou 12 mois (m). Aucune intervention pharmacologique n'affectait de façon significative les taux de sevrage tabagique.

La formation relative à la gestion pondérale seule était liée à l'absence d'une baisse de la PPAS à la fin du traitement (6 ou 12 m). Toutefois, ces interventions ont largement réduit l'abstinence à 12 m (risque relatif (RR) 0,66, IC à 95 % 0,48 à 0,90, N = 2). Le support personnalisé de la gestion pondérale réduisait la PPAS au bout de 12 m (DM - 2,58  kg, IC à 95 % - 5,11 à - 0,05, N = 2) et n'était pas lié à une baisse significative de l'abstinence au bout de 12 m (RR 0,74, IC à 95 % 0,39 à 1,43, N = 2). Un régime à très basses calories (RTBC) réduisait de façon significative la PPAS à la fin du traitement (DM - 3,70  kg, IC à 95 % - 4,82 à - 2,58, N = 1), ce qui n'était pas le cas au bout de 12 m (DM - 1,30  kg, IC à 95 % - 3,49 à 0,89, N = 1). Un RTBC facilitait l'abstinence au bout de 12 m (RR 1,73, IC à 95 % 1,10 à 2,73, N = 1). Aucune preuve n'a permis de démontrer qu'un traitement comportemental cognitif (TCC) visant à apaiser les inquiétudes concernant la prise de poids réduisait la PPAS, mais certaines preuves révélaient une hausse de la PPAS au bout de 6 m (DM 0,74, IC à 95 % 0,24 à 1,24). Elles étaient liées à une abstinence plus efficace au bout de 6 mois (RR 1,83, IC à 95 % 1,07 à 3,13, N = 2), mais pas au bout de 12 m (RR 1,25, IC à 95 % 0,83 à 1,86, N = 2). Toutefois, on constatait une importante hétérogénéité statistique.

Partie 2 : Nous n'avons trouvé aucune preuve démontrant que les interventions incluant des exercices réduisaient de façon significative la PPAS à la fin du traitement (DM - 0,25  kg, IC à 95 % - 0,78 à 0,29, N = 4). Toutefois, une baisse significative a été constatée au bout de 12 m (DM - 2,07  kg, IC à 95 % - 3,78 à - 0,36, N = 3).

Le bupropion et la fluoxétine limitaient la PPAS à la fin du traitement (bupropion DM - 1,12  kg, IC à 95 % - 1,47 à - 0,77, N = 7) (fluoxétine DM - 0,99  kg, IC à 95 % - 1,36 à - 0,61, N = 2). Aucune preuve ne révélait une persistance des effets au bout de 6 m (bupropion DM - 0,58  kg, IC à 95 % - 2,16 à 1,00, N = 4), (fluoxétine DM - 0,01  kg, IC à 95 % - 1,11 à 1,10, N = 2) ou de 12 m (bupropion DM - 0,38  kg, IC à 95 % - 2,00 à 1,24, N = 4). Aucune donnée n'était disponible sur la PP au bout de 12 m avec la fluoxétine.

Dans l'ensemble, un TSN permettait de réduire la PPAS à la fin du traitement (DM - 0,69  kg, IC à 95 % - 0,88 à - 0,51, N = 19) sans preuve probante démontrant une variation de ses effets en fonction des différentes formes de TSN. Il existait des preuves faisant état d'une hétérogénéité statistique significative dans une étude qui signalaient une baisse de 4,3 kg de la PPAS grâce à un TSN. En supprimant cette étude, la différence de variation pondérale à la fin du traitement était de - 0,45  kg (IC à 95 % - 0,66 à - 0,27, N = 18). Il n'existait aucune preuve concernant des effets sur la PPAS au bout de 12 m (DM - 0,42  kg, IC à 95 % - 0,92 à 0,08, N = 15).

Nous avons trouvé des preuves selon lesquelles la varénicline réduisait de façon significative la PPAS à la fin du traitement (DM - 0,41  kg, IC à 95 % - 0,63 à - 0,19, N = 11), mais ces effets s'atténuaient au bout de 6 ou 12 m. Trois études comparaient les effets du bupropion à la varénicline. Les participants prenant du bupropion prenaient beaucoup moins de poids à la fin du traitement (- 0,51  kg (IC à 95 % - 0,93 à - 0,09 kg), N = 3). Une comparaison directe ne révélait aucune différence significative de la PPAS entre la varénicline et un TSN.

Conclusions des auteurs

Malgré la réussite à courte terme de certaines pharmacothérapies testées pour limiter la PPAS, d'autres problèmes afférents et le manque de données sur leur efficacité à long terme limitent leur usage. La formation relative à la gestion pondérale seule n'est pas efficace et peut réduire l'abstinence. Un support personnalisé de la gestion pondérale peut se révéler efficace et ne pas réduire l'abstinence, mais les données sont insuffisantes pour le confirmer. Une étude a révélé qu'un RTBC améliorait l'abstinence, sans toutefois empêcher la PP à long terme. Un TSN visant à accepter la PP ne limitait pas la PPAS et pouvait compromettre l'abstinence à long terme. Les interventions incluant des exercices réduisaient de façon significative la prise de poids à long terme, mais pas à court terme. D'autres études doivent être effectuées pour déterminer s'il s'agit d'un effet du traitement ou d'une découverte due au hasard. La prise de bupropion, de fluoxétine, d'un TSN et de varénicline réduit la PPAS pendant le traitement. Bien que leurs effets se dissipent au bout d'un an après le sevrage tabagique, les preuves sont insuffisantes pour exclure des effets modestes à long terme. Les données sont insuffisantes pour émettre des recommandations cliniques fiables relatives à des programmes efficaces visant à éviter la prise de poids après un sevrage tabagique.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour éviter la prise de poids après un sevrage tabagique

L'arrêt du tabagisme entraîne une prise de poids dans la majorité des cas. Ce problème concerne de nombreux fumeurs, ce qui pourrait les décourager d'entreprendre une démarche de sevrage tabagique. Certaines études révèlent que la prise de poids incite aussi les personnes à se remettre à fumer après une tentative de sevrage réussie initialement. En revanche, tout laisse penser que les tentatives visant à limiter la prise de poids peuvent réduire les chances de réussite d'un sevrage tabagique. Plusieurs médicaments et programmes comportementaux permettant de limiter la prise de poids après un sevrage ont été testés. Parmi les traitements médicamenteux, la naltréxone était le plus prometteur, mais il n'existait aucune donnée concernant ses effets sur le poids après l'arrêt du traitement et les preuves étaient insuffisantes pour évaluer ses effets sur le sevrage à long terme. La formation relative à la gestion pondérale seule ne permettait pas de limiter la prise de poids et pouvait compromettre le sevrage. Cette formation disposant d'un support personnalisé avec rétroaction concernant les objectifs personnels et d'une prescription énergétique personnelle limitait la prise de poids, mais aucune preuve ne démontrait qu'elle compromettait le sevrage. Un régime intermittent à très basses calories augmentait les chances de réussite d'un sevrage et la prise de poids à court terme, mais pas à long terme.

Certains traitements de sevrage tabagique limitaient aussi la prise de poids. Le bupropion, la fluoxétine, un TSN et la varénicline limitaient tous la prise de poids pendant le traitement. Cependant, leurs effets sur la baisse pondérale étaient moins importants après l'arrêt du traitement et les preuves étaient insuffisantes pour démontrer la persistance de ces effets à long terme. Certaines preuves suggéraient que l'exercice physique limitait la prise de poids après un sevrage, mais davantage d'études doivent être effectuées pour déterminer s'il s'agissait d'une découverte due au hasard ou pas. Les effets de toutes ces interventions étaient modestes par rapport à la prise de poids moyenne après l'arrêt d'un sevrage tabagique.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 10th April, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français