Intervention Review

Physical therapy for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis)

  1. Lázaro J Teixeira1,*,
  2. Juliana S Valbuza2,
  3. Gilmar F Prado3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group

Published Online: 7 DEC 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 21 FEB 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006283.pub3

How to Cite

Teixeira LJ, Valbuza JS, Prado GF. Physical therapy for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD006283. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006283.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Department of Neurology, Camboriu, Santa Catarina, Brazil

  2. 2

    Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Neuro-Sono, Department of Neurology, São Paulo, Brazil

  3. 3

    Federal University of São Paulo, Department of Neurology, São Paulo - SP, Brazil

*Lázaro J Teixeira, Department of Neurology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, R. Ana Garcia Pereira, n 167, Camboriu, Santa Catarina, 88340-970, Brazil. lazarojt@terra.com.br.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 7 DEC 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis) is commonly treated by various physical therapy strategies and devices, but there are many questions about their efficacy.

Objectives

To evaluate physical therapies for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial palsy).

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2011), MEDLINE (January 1966 to February 2011), EMBASE (January 1946 to February 2011), LILACS (January 1982 to February 2011), PEDro (from 1929 to February 2011), and CINAHL (January 1982 to February 2011). We included searches in clinical trials register databases until February 2011.

Selection criteria

We selected randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials involving any physical therapy. We included participants of any age with a diagnosis of Bell's palsy and all degrees of severity. The outcome measures were: incomplete recovery six months after randomisation, motor synkinesis, crocodile tears or facial spasm six months after onset, incomplete recovery after one year and adverse effects attributable to the intervention.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently scrutinised titles and abstracts identified from the search results. Two authors independently carried out risk of bias assessments, which took into account secure methods of randomisation, allocation concealment, observer blinding, patient blinding, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting and other bias. Two authors independently extracted data using a specially constructed data extraction form. We undertook separate subgroup analyses of participants with more and less severe disability.

Main results

For this update to the original review, the search identified 65 potentially relevant articles. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria (872 participants). Four trials studied the efficacy of electrical stimulation (313 participants), three trials studied exercises (199 participants), and five studies compared or combined some form of physical therapy with acupuncture (360 participants). For most outcomes we were unable to perform meta-analysis because the interventions and outcomes were not comparable.

For the primary outcome of incomplete recovery after six months, electrostimulation produced no benefit over placebo (moderate quality evidence from one study with 86 participants). Low quality comparisons of electrostimulation with prednisolone (an active treatment) (149 participants), or the addition of electrostimulation to hot packs, massage and facial exercises (22 participants), reported no significant differences. Similarly a meta-analysis from two studies, one of three months and the other of six months duration (142 participants) found no statistically significant difference in synkinesis, a complication of Bell's palsy, between participants receiving electrostimulation and controls. A single low quality study (56 participants), which reported at three months, found worse functional recovery with electrostimulation (mean difference (MD) 12.00 points (scale of 0 to 100) 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.26 to 22.74).

Two trials of facial exercises, both at high risk of bias, found no difference in incomplete recovery at six months when exercises were compared to waiting list controls or conventional therapy. There is evidence from a single small study (34 participants) of moderate quality that exercises are beneficial on measures of facial disability to people with chronic facial palsy when compared with controls (MD 20.40 points (scale of 0 to 100), 95% CI 8.76 to 32.04) and from another single low quality study with 145 people with acute cases treated for three months, in which significantly fewer participants developed facial motor synkinesis after exercise (risk ratio 0.24, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.69). The same study showed statistically significant reduction in time for complete recovery, mainly in more severe cases (47 participants, MD -2.10 weeks, 95% CI -3.15 to -1.05) but this was not a prespecified outcome in this meta analysis.

Acupuncture studies did not provide useful data as all were short and at high risk of bias. None of the studies included adverse events as an outcome.

Authors' conclusions

There is no high quality evidence to support significant benefit or harm from any physical therapy for idiopathic facial paralysis. There is low quality evidence that tailored facial exercises can help to improve facial function, mainly for people with moderate paralysis and chronic cases. There is low quality evidence that facial exercise reduces sequelae in acute cases. The suggested effects of tailored facial exercises need to be confirmed with good quality randomised controlled trials.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Physical treatments for idiopathic facial paralysis

Bell's palsy is an acute disorder of the facial nerve, which produces full or partial loss of movement on one side of the face. The facial palsy gets completely better without treatment in most, but not all, people. Physical therapies, such as exercise, biofeedback, laser treatment, electrotherapy, massage and thermotherapy, are used to hasten recovery, improve facial function and minimise sequelae. For this updated review we found a total of 12 studies with 872 participants, most with high risk of bias. Four trials studied the efficacy of electrical stimulation (313 participants), three trials studied exercises (199 participants), and five studies combined some form of physical therapy and compared with acupuncture (360 participants). There is evidence from a single study of moderate quality that exercises are beneficial to people with chronic facial palsy when compared with controls and from another low quality study that it is possible that facial exercises could help to reduce synkinesis (a complication of Bell's palsy), and the time to recover. There is insufficient evidence to decide whether electrical stimulation works, to identify risks of these treatments or to assess whether the addition of acupuncture to facial exercises or other physical therapy could produce improvement. In conclusion, tailored facial exercises can help to improve facial function, mainly for people with moderate paralysis and chronic cases, and early facial exercise may reduce recovery time and long term paralysis in acute cases, but the evidence for this is of poor quality. More trials are needed to assess the effects of facial exercises and any risks.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Physical therapy for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis)

Contexte

La paralysie de Bell (paralysie faciale idiopathique) est communément traitée par différentes méthodes et appareils de kinésithérapie, mais beaucoup de questions demeurent quant à leur efficacité.

Objectifs

Évaluer les méthodes de kinésithérapie dans la paralysie de Bell (paralysie faciale idiopathique).

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans la base des revues systématiques Cochrane et dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (The Cochrane Library, numéro 1, 2011), ainsi que dans MEDLINE (janvier 1966 à février 2011), EMBASE (janvier 1946 à février 2011), LILACS (janvier 1982 à février 2011), PEDro (de 1929 à février 2011) et CINAHL (janvier 1982 à février 2011). Nous avons inclus des recherches dans les bases de données d'essais cliniques jusqu'à février 2011.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons sélectionné des essais contrôlés randomisés ou quasi-randomisés portant sur tout type de kinésithérapie. Nous avons inclus des participants ayant un diagnostic de paralysie de Bell, quelque soit leur âge et leur degré de gravité. Les critères d’évaluation étaient les suivants : guérison incomplète six mois après la randomisation, syncinésie motrice, larmes de crocodile ou spasme facial six mois après l'apparition de la paralysie, guérison incomplète à un an et effets indésirables attribuables à l'intervention

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont examiné des titres et des résumés identifiés dans les résultats de recherche de façon indépendante. Deux auteurs ont évalué de manière indépendante les risques de biais en prenant en compte les méthodes sécurisées de randomisation, l'assignation secrète, l'insu de l'observateur, l'insu du patient, les données de résultats incomplètes, les compte rendus de résultats sélectifs et autres biais. Deux auteurs ont extrait les données de façon indépendante en utilisant un formulaire d'extraction des données spécialement conçu à cet effet. Nous avons entrepris des analyses séparées en sous-groupes en fonction du niveau de gravité des participants .

Résultats Principaux

Pour cette mise à jour de la revue originale, la recherche a permis d'identifier 65 articles potentiellement pertinents. Douze études répondaient aux critères d'inclusion (872 participants). Quatre essais avaient étudié l'efficacité de la stimulation électrique (313 participants), trois essais portaient sur des programmes d’exercice des muscles du visage (199 participants), et cinq études comparaient ou combinaient une certaine forme de kinésithérapie avec l'acupuncture (360 participants). Pour la plupart des critères de de jugement, nous n'avons pas pu effectuer de méta-analyse parce que c les interventions et les critères de jugement n'étaient pas comparables.

Pour le critère principal de guérison incomplète après six mois, l'électrostimulation n'a montré aucun avantage par rapport au placebo (preuve de qualité moyenne basée sur une étude incluant 86 participants). Des comparaisons de faible qualité entre l'électrostimulation et la prednisolone (un traitement actif) (149 participants), ou l'ajout de l'électrostimulation aux compresses chaudes, aux massages et à la gymnastique faciale (22 participants), n'ont révélé aucune différence significative. De même, une méta-analyse de deux études, l'une d'une durée de trois mois et l'autre de six mois, (142 participants) n'a mis en évidence aucune différence statistiquement significative au niveau de la syncinésie, une complication de la paralysie de Bell, entre les participants bénéficiant de l'électrostimulation et le groupe témoin. Une étude de qualité faible (56 participants) présentant les résultats après trois mois a trouvé que la récupération fonctionnelle était moins bonne avec l'électrostimulation (différence moyenne (DM) 12,00 points (échelle de 0 à 100) ; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% 1,26 à 22,74).

Deux essais portant sur la gymnastique faciale, tous deux à risque élevé de biais, n'ont trouvé aucune différence au niveau de la guérison incomplète à six mois lorsque les exercices étaient comparés avec des groupes témoins sur liste d'attente ou recevant un traitement classique. Il y a des preuves provenant d'une seule petite étude (34 participants) de qualité moyenne que les exercices des muscles du visage sont bénéfiques pour des scores d'invalidité faciale chez les personnes atteintes de paralysie faciale chronique, comparativement aux groupes témoins (DM 20,40 points (échelle de 0 à 100) ; IC 95% 8,76 à 32,04). Dans une autre étude de faible qualité impliquant 145 cas aigus traités pendant trois mois, moins de participants présentaient une syncinésie motrice faciale après un traitement par exercice (risque relatif 0,24 ; IC 95% 0,08 à 0,69). La même étude a montré une diminution statistiquement significative du temps nécessaire à une guérison complète, essentiellement dans les cas les plus graves (47 participants ; DM -2,10 semaines ; IC 95% -3,15 à -1,05) mais il ne s'agissait pas là d'un critère de résultat préalablementétabli pour cette méta-analyse.

Les études utilisant des traitements d'acupuncture n'ont pas produit de données utiles car leur durée était courte et présentaient un risque élevé de biais. Aucune des études n'avait inclus les effets indésirables parmi les critères de résultat

Conclusions des auteurs

Il n'existe aucune preuve de bonne qualité permettant d'affirmer qu'une traitement de kinésithérapie soit significativement bénéfique ou préjudiciable pour le traitement de la paralysie faciale idiopathique. Il existe des preuves de faible qualité que des exercices des muscles du visage personnalisés peuventt aider à améliorer la fonction faciale, principalement chez les personnes avec une paralysie modérée et chroniques. Il existe des preuves de faible qualité que les exercicesréduisent les séquelles dans les cas aigus. Les effets estimés des exercices des muscles du visage personnalisés devront être confirmés par es 'essais contrôlés randomisés de bonne qualité.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Physical therapy for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis)

Les traitements physiques de la paralysie faciale idiopathique

La paralysie de Bell est un trouble aigu du nerf facial qui induit une perte complète ou partielle de la mobilité dans une des deux moitiés du visage. La paralysie faciale guérit complètement sans traitement dans la plupart des cas, mais pas tout le temps . Les méthodes de kinésithérapie, comme les exercices des muscles du visage, le biofeedback, le traitement au laser, l'électrothérapie, le massage et la thermothérapie, sont utilisées pour accélérer la guérison, améliorer la fonction faciale et minimiser les séquelles. Pour la mise à jour de cette revue, nous avons trouvé 12 études (872 participants en tout), la plupart avec un risque élevé de biais. Quatre essais avaient étudié l'efficacité de la stimulation électrique (313 participants), trois essais portaient sur les exercices des muscles du visage (199 participants), et cinq études comparaient ou combinaient certaines méthodes de kinésithérapie avec l'acupuncture (360 participants). Il existe des preuves provenant d'une seule étude de qualité moyenne que les exercices des muscles du visage sont bénéfiques pour les personnes avec une paralysie faciale chronique, comparativement au groupe témoin. Dans une autre étude de faible qualité, on constate qu'il est possible que les exercices des muscles du visage puissent aider à réduire la syncinésie (une complication de la paralysie de Bell) et à diminuer le temps de guérison. On ne dispose pas de suffisamment d'éléments probants pour établir si la stimulation électrique fonctionne, identifier les risques de ces traitements ou évaluer si l'ajout de l'acupuncture aux exercices des muscles du visage ou à une autre thérapie physique pourrait produire une amélioration. En conclusion, les exercices des muscles du visage personnalisés peuvent contribuer à améliorer la fonction faciale, principalement chez les personnes atteintes de paralysie modérée et dans les cas chroniques, et les exercices des muscles du visage précoce peuvent diminuer le temps de guérison et la paralysie à long terme dans les cas aigus, mais les preuves de cela sont de mauvaise qualité. Des essais supplémentaires seront nécessaires pour évaluer les effets de la gymnastique faciale ainsi que ses risques éventuels.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st January, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français