Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

First-line allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation of HLA-matched sibling donors compared with first-line ciclosporin and/or antithymocyte or antilymphocyte globulin for acquired severe aplastic anemia

  1. Frank Peinemann1,*,
  2. Carmen Bartel2,
  3. Ulrich Grouven3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Haematological Malignancies Group

Published Online: 23 JUL 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 22 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006407.pub2


How to Cite

Peinemann F, Bartel C, Grouven U. First-line allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation of HLA-matched sibling donors compared with first-line ciclosporin and/or antithymocyte or antilymphocyte globulin for acquired severe aplastic anemia. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD006407. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006407.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Children's Hospital, University of Cologne, Cologne, NW, Germany

  2. 2

    Cologne, Germany

  3. 3

    Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany

*Frank Peinemann, Children's Hospital, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, Cologne, NW, 50937, Germany. pubmedprjournal@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 23 JUL 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Acquired severe aplastic anemia is a rare and potentially fatal disease, which is characterized by hypocellular bone marrow and pancytopenia. The major signs and symptoms are severe infections, bleeding, and exhaustion. First-line allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) of a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling donor (MSD) is a treatment for newly diagnosed patients with severe aplastic anemia. First-line treatment with ciclosporin and/or antithymocyte or antilymphocyte globulin (as first-line immunosuppressive therapy) is an alternative to MSD-HSCT and is indicated for patients where no MSD is found.

Objectives

To evaluate the effectiveness and adverse events of first-line allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation of HLA-matched sibling donors compared to first-line immunosuppressive therapy including ciclosporin and/or antithymocyte or antilymphocyte globulin in patients with acquired severe aplastic anemia.

Search methods

We searched the electronic databases MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), and The Cochrane Library CENTRAL (Wiley) for published articles from 1946 to 22 April 2013. Further searches included trial registries, reference lists of recent reviews, and author contacts.

Selection criteria

The following prospective study designs were eligible for inclusion: randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomized controlled trials if the allocation of patients to treatment groups was consistent with 'Mendelian randomization'. We included participants with newly diagnosed severe aplastic anemia who received MSD-HSCT or immunosuppressive therapy without prior HSCT or immunosuppressive therapy, and with a minimum of five participants per treatment group. We did not apply limits on publication year or languages.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors abstracted the data on study and patient characteristics and assessed the risk of bias independently. We resolved differences by discussion or by appeal to a third review author. The primary outcome was overall mortality. Secondary outcomes were treatment-related mortality, graft failure, no response to first-line immunosuppressive therapy, graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), relapse after initial successful treatment, secondary clonal and malignant disease, health-related quality of life, and performance score.

Main results

We identified three trials that met the inclusion criteria. None of these trials was a RCT. 302 participants are included in this review. The three included studies were prospectively conducted and had features consistent with the principle of 'Mendelian randomization' as defined in the present review. All studies had a high risk of bias due to the study design. All studies were conducted more than 10 years ago and may not be applicable to the standard of care of today. Primary and secondary outcome data showed no statistically significant difference between treatment groups. We present results for first-line allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation of an HLA-matched sibling donor, which we denote as the MSD-HSCT group, versus first-line treatment with ciclosporin and/or antithymocyte or antilymphocyte globulin, which we denote as the immunosuppressive therapy group in the following section.

The pooled hazard ratio for overall mortality for the MSD-HSCT group versus the immunosuppressive therapy group was 0.95 (95% confidence interval 0.43 to 2.12, P = 0.90, low quality evidence). Therefore, overall mortality was not statistically significantly different between the groups. Treatment-related mortality ranged from 20% to 42% for the MSD-HSCT group and was not reported for the immunosuppressive therapy group (very low quality evidence). The authors reported graft failure from 3% to 16% for the MSD-HSCT group and GVHD from 26% to 51% (both endpoints not applicable for the immunosuppressive therapy group, very low quality evidence). The authors did not report any data on response and relapse for the MSD-HSCT group. For the immunosuppressive therapy group, the studies reported no response from 15% (not time point stated) to 64% (three months) and relapse in one of eight responders after immunosuppressive therapy at 5.5 years (very low quality evidence). The authors reported secondary clonal disease or malignancies for the MSD-HSCT group versus the immunosuppressive therapy group in 1 of 34 versus 0 of 22 patients in one study and in 0 of 28 versus 4 of 86 patients in the other study (low quality evidence). None of the included studies addressed health-related quality of life. The percentage of the evaluated patients with a Karnofsky performance status score in the range of 71% to 100% was 92% in the MSD-HSCT group and 46% in the immunosuppressive therapy group.

Authors' conclusions

There are insufficient and biased data that do not allow any conclusions to be made about the comparative effectiveness of first-line allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation of an HLA-matched sibling donor and first-line treatment with ciclosporin and/or antithymocyte or antilymphocyte globulin (as first-line immunosuppressive therapy). We are unable to make firm recommendations regarding the choice of intervention for treatment of acquired severe aplastic anemia.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Stem cell transplantation of sibling donors compared with specific immunosuppressive therapy for acquired severe aplastic anemia

Acquired severe aplastic anemia is rare. Stem cells from the bone marrow usually replace naturally dying blood cells in the peripheral blood. Severe aplastic anemia is probably caused by an irregular, attacking immune response against these blood producing stem cells within the body. If supplies are not maintained, functional blood cells are lacking and infections, bleeding, and exhaustion will occur. Patients may experience paleness, weakness, fatigue, and shortness of breath. Disease progression is associated with severe infections, which are a major cause of death.

The transplantation of stem cells from a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling donor without prior therapy (first-line therapy) is a treatment option for newly diagnosed patients with severe aplastic anemia. An HLA-matched sibling donor, a brother or a sister, serves as a donor of stem cells that carry identical (matched) genetic characteristics to the HLA genes. The harvested cells are transfused intravenously and produce new blood cells. Problems may arise when the cells do not settle down sufficiently to produce blood cells (graft failure) or if the donor immune cells recognize body cells of the recipient as foreign and attack them (graft-versus-host disease). Both problems may lead to early death.

The application of the drugs ciclosporin and/or antithymocyte or antilymphocyte globulin as immunosuppressive therapy without prior therapy (i.e. as first-line therapy) is an alternative to transplantation and can be used for patients where no HLA-matched sibling donor is found. Immunosuppressive therapy means the drugs suppress reactions of the immune system. The aim is to reduce abnormal immune reactions. Problems may arise when patients do not respond well or show no response at all.

We identified three studies meeting our quality criteria for inclusion in the review. All had methodological limitations meaning that we could not draw firm conclusions. With respect to the primary outcomes, they showed ambiguous results for overall mortality when comparing treatment arms: one study favored transplantation and two studies favored treatment with ciclosporin and/or antithymocyte or antilymphocyte globulin. Treatment-related mortality, that is death caused by complications of the treatment, was considerable for patients in the transplantation arm. Treatment failure, that is no response to treatment, was substantial for patients in the ciclosporin and/or antithymocyte or antilymphocyte globulin arm. Graft failure was reported for 3% to 16% and graft-versus-host-disease for 26% to 51% of the transplanted patients. Because the data are scarce and biased it is not possible to determine which treatment is better - transplantation for HLA-matched sibling donors or ciclosporin and/or antithymocyte or antilymphocyte globulin for patients that do not have such a sibling.

Several reasons make it highly probable that there will not be any good evidence comparing these interventions in the future. One reason is that randomized controlled trials are unlikely to be conducted due to ethical constraints and strong patient and clinician preferences. Studies with 'Mendelian randomization' could provide some good evidence in theory, however, in practice they are difficult to conduct properly and have been disappointing. 'Mendelian randomization' means the view that nature itself has already 'randomized' the paternal and maternal part of a gene given that donor and recipient are siblings. Another reason is that the outcome of transplantation has improved considerably. This is true for matched donor transplantation including both related and unrelated donors. It means that ciclosporin and/or antithymocyte or antilymphocyte globulin may not be a first treatment choice if a matched sibling or even a matched unrelated donor is available.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Greffe allogénique de première intention de cellules souches hématopoïétiques provenant de donneurs de la fratrie ayant des ALH compatibles comparée à une cyclosporine et/ou antithymocyte ou globuline antilymphocytaire de première intention contre l'ané...

Contexte

L'anémie aplasique grave acquise est une maladie rare et potentiellement mortelle caractérisée par une moelle osseuse hypocellulaire et une pancytopénie. Les principaux signes et symptômes sont des infections graves, des saignements et un épuisement. La greffe allogénique de première intention de cellules souches hématopoïétiques (GCSH) provenant de donneurs de la fratrie ayant des antigènes leucocytaires humains (ALH) compatibles (DFC) est un traitement pour les patients atteints d'une anémie aplasique grave récemment diagnostiquée. Le traitement de première intention à la cyclosporine et/ou antithymocyte ou globuline antilymphocytaire (à titre de traitement immunosuppresseur de première intention) est une alternative à la GCSH-DFC et est indiqué pour les patients chez lesquels aucun DFC n'est trouvé.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité et les événements indésirables de la greffe allogénique de première intention de cellules souches hématopoïétiques provenant de donneurs de la fratrie ayant des ALH compatibles comparé à un traitement immunosuppresseur de première intention comprenant cyclosporine et/ou antithymocyte ou globuline antilymphocytaire chez les patients atteints d'anémie aplasique grave acquise.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données électroniques MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid) et The Cochrane Library CENTRAL (Wiley) afin de trouver des articles publiés de 1946 au 22 avril 2013. Les recherches supplémentaires ont inclus des registres d'essais, des listes bibliographiques de revues récentes et des contacts avec les auteurs.

Critères de sélection

Les plans d'études prospectives suivants étaient éligibles à l'inclusion : essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) et essais contrôlés non-randomisés si l'assignation des patients à des groupes de traitement était cohérente avec une « randomisation mendélienne. » Nous avons inclus les participants atteints d'une anémie aplasique grave récemment diagnostiquée qui recevaient une GCSH-DFC ou un traitement immunosuppresseur sans GCSH préalable ou un traitement immunosuppresseur, avec un minimum de cinq participants par groupe de traitement. Nous n'avons pas appliqué de limites quant à l'année ou à la langue de publication.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont extrait les données sur les caractéristiques des études et des patients et évalué le risque de biais de façon indépendante. Nous avons résolu les désaccords par la discussion ou en ayant recours à un troisième auteur de la revue. Le critère de jugement principal était la mortalité globale. Les critères de jugement secondaires étaient la mortalité liée au traitement, le rejet de la greffe, l'absence de réponse au traitement immunosuppresseur de première intention, la maladie du greffon contre l'hôte (MGCH), la récidive après la réussite d'un traitement initial, la maladie clonale et maligne secondaire, la qualité de vie liée à la santé et le score de performance.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons identifié trois essais qui répondaient aux critères d'inclusion. Aucun de ces essais n'était un ECR. 302 participants sont inclus dans cette revue. Les trois études incluses avaient été réalisées de façon prospective et possédaient des caractéristiques compatibles avec le principe de « randomisation mendélienne », tel que défini dans la présente revue. Toutes les études avaient un risque de biais élevé en raison de leur plan d'étude. Toutes les études ont été menées il y a plus de 10 ans et peuvent ne pas être applicables aux normes de soins d'aujourd'hui. Les critères de jugement primaires et secondaires n'ont montré aucune différence statistiquement significative entre les groupes de traitement. Nous présentons les résultats pour la greffe allogénique de première intention de cellules souches hématopoïétiques provenant d'un donneur de la fratrie ayant des ALH compatibles, que nous appelons le groupe GCSH-DFC, versus traitement de première intention à la cyclosporine et/ou antithymocyte ou globuline antilymphocytaire, que nous appelons le groupe de traitement immunosuppresseur dans la section suivante.

Le hazard ratio combiné pour la mortalité globale concernant le groupe GCSH-DFC versus le groupe du traitement immunosuppresseur a été de 0,95 (intervalle de confiance à 95 % 0,43 à 2,12, P = 0,90, preuves de qualité médiocre). Par conséquent, la mortalité globale n'a pas différé de manière statistiquement significative entre les groupes. La mortalité liée au traitement variait de 20 % à 42 % pour le groupe GCSH-DFC et n'a pas été rapportée pour le groupe du traitement immunosuppresseur (preuves de qualité très médiocre). Les auteurs ont rapporté des rejets de greffe de 3 % à 16 % pour le groupe de GCSH-DFC et une MGCH de 26 % à 51 % (ces deux critères de jugement n'étant pas applicables au groupe du traitement immunosuppresseur, preuves de qualité très médiocre). Les auteurs n'ont rapporté aucune donnée concernant la réponse et la récidive pour le groupe GCSH-DFC. Pour le groupe du traitement immunosuppresseur, les études ont rapporté une absence de réponse pour 15 % (pas de date indiquée) à 64 % (trois mois) et une récidive chez un répondeur sur huit après le traitement immunosuppresseur à 5,5 ans (preuves de qualité très médiocre). Les auteurs ont rapporté une maladie clonale secondaire ou des tumeurs malignes pour le groupe GCSH-DFC versus le groupe du traitement immunosuppresseur chez 1 patients sur 34 versus 0 patients sur 22 dans une étude et chez 0 patients sur 28 versus 4 patients sur 86 dans l'autre étude (preuves de qualité médiocre). Aucune des études incluses n'a examiné la qualité de vie liée à la santé. Le pourcentage des patients évalués ayant un score de performance sur l'échelle de Karnofsky dans la fourchette de 71 % à 100% a été de 92 % dans le groupe de GCSH-DFC et de 46 % dans le groupe du traitement immunosuppresseur.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les données sont insuffisantes et biaisées, et ne permettent pas de tirer de conclusions quant à l'efficacité comparative de la greffe allogénique de première intention de cellules souches hématopoïétiques provenant d'un donneur de la fratrie ayant des ALH compatibles et d'un traitement de première intention à la cyclosporine et/ou antithymocyte ou globuline antilymphocytaire (à titre de traitement immunosuppresseur de première intention). Nous ne sommes pas en mesure d'établir des recommandations fermes concernant le choix de l'intervention pour le traitement de l'anémie aplasique grave acquise.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Greffe allogénique de première intention de cellules souches hématopoïétiques provenant de donneurs de la fratrie ayant des ALH compatibles comparée à une cyclosporine et/ou antithymocyte ou globuline antilymphocytaire de première intention contre l'ané...

Greffe de cellules souches provenant de donneurs de la fratrie comparé au traitement immunosuppresseur spécifique contre l'anémie aplasique grave acquise

L'anémie aplasique grave acquise est rare. En général, les cellules souches de la moelle osseuse remplacent naturellement les cellules sanguines mortes dans le sang périphérique. L'anémie aplasique grave est probablement provoquée par une réponse immunitaire d'attaque irrégulière contre les cellules souches produisant du sang dans l'organisme. Si les réserves ne sont pas assurées, les cellules sanguines fonctionnelles sont insuffisantes et des infections, des saignements et un épuisement surviendront. Les patients peuvent être pâles et ressentir une faiblesse, une fatigue et un essoufflement. La progression de la maladie est associée à de graves infections qui sont une cause majeure de décès.

La greffe de cellules souches provenant d'un donneur de la fratrie ayant des antigènes leucocytaires humains (ALH) compatibles sans traitement préalable (traitement de première intention) est une option de traitement pour les patients atteints d'une anémie aplasique grave récemment diagnostiquée. Un donneur de la fratrie ayant des ALH compatibles, un frère ou une sœur, sert de donneur de cellules souches portant des caractéristiques génétiques identiques aux gènes de l'ALH (compatibles). Les cellules récoltées sont transfusées par intraveineuse et produisent de nouvelles cellules sanguines. Des problèmes peuvent survenir lorsque les cellules ne se stabilisent pas suffisamment pour produire des cellules sanguines (rejet de greffe) ou si les cellules immunitaires du donneur reconnaissent les cellules du corps du receveur comme des cellules étrangères et les attaquent (maladie du greffon contre l'hôte). Les deux problèmes peuvent conduire à un décès précoce.

L'application des médicaments cyclosporine et/ou antithymocyte ou globuline antilymphocytaire à titre de traitement immunosuppresseur sans traitement préalable (c'est-à-dire traitement de première intention) est une alternative à la greffe et peut être utilisée pour les patients pour lesquels aucun donneur de la fratrie ayant des ALH compatibles n'est trouvé. Le traitement immunosuppresseur implique la suppression par les médicaments des réactions du système immunitaire. Le but est de réduire les réactions immunitaires anormales. Des problèmes peuvent survenir lorsque les patients ne réagissent pas bien ou ne montrent absolument aucune réponse.

Nous avons identifié trois études répondant à nos critères d'inclusion dans la revue. Toutes présentaient des limitations méthodologiques, ce qui signifie que nous n'avons pas pu tirer de conclusions solides. Concernant les principaux critères de jugement, elles ont montré des résultats ambigus lors des comparaisons des bras de traitement : une étude était en faveur de la greffe et deux études étaient en faveur du traitement à la cyclosporine et/ou antithymocyte ou à la globuline antilymphocytaire. La mortalité liée au traitement, c'est-à-dire les décès provoqués par des complications du traitement, a été considérable pour les patients dans le bras de la greffe. L'échec du traitement, c'est-à-dire l'absence de réponse au traitement, a été substantielle pour les patients dans le bras de cyclosporine et/ou antithymocyte ou globuline antilymphocytaire. Un rejet de la greffe a été rapporté pour 3 % à 16 % et une maladie du greffon contre l'hôte a été rapportée pour 26 % à 51 % des patients transplantés. En raison de la faible quantité et du biais des données, il n'est pas possible de déterminer quel est le meilleur traitement, entre la greffe pour les donneurs de la fratrie ayant des ALH compatibles ou la cyclosporine et/ou antithymocyte ou globuline antilymphocytaire pour les patients n'ayant pas une telle fratrie.

Plusieurs raisons expliquent qu'il soit très probable qu'aucune preuve de bonne qualité ne soit trouvée lorsque ces interventions seront comparées dans le futur. L'une d'elle est qu'il est improbable que des essais contrôlés randomisés soient réalisés en raison de contraintes éthiques et des fortes préférences des patients et des médecins. Des études avec une « randomisation mendélienne » pourraient fournir des preuves de bonne qualité en théorie, cependant, dans la pratique, elles sont difficiles à réaliser correctement et se sont révélées décevantes. La « randomisation mendélienne » suppose qu'on considère que la nature elle-même a déjà « randomisé » la partie paternelle et maternelle d'un gène du fait que le donneur et le receveur sont de la même fratrie. Une autre raison est que l'issue de la greffe s'est considérablement améliorée. Cela est vrai pour la greffe avec un donneur compatible, incluant à la fois les donneurs avec et sans lien de parenté. Cela signifie que la cyclosporine et/ou antithymocyte ou la globuline antilymphocytaire peuvent ne pas être un traitement de premier choix si un donneur de la fratrie compatible, voire un donneur compatible sans lien de parenté, est disponible.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 4th September, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.