Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Neuroprotection for treatment of glaucoma in adults

  1. Dayse F Sena1,*,
  2. Kristina Lindsley2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group

Published Online: 28 FEB 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 16 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006539.pub3

How to Cite

Sena DF, Lindsley K. Neuroprotection for treatment of glaucoma in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD006539. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006539.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

  2. 2

    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

*Dayse F Sena, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 243 Charles St, Connecting Building 703, Boston, Massachusetts, 02114, USA. sena.dayse@gmail.com. sena.dayse@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 28 FEB 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Glaucoma is a heterogeneous group of conditions involving progressive damage to the optic nerve, deterioration of retinal ganglion cells and ultimately visual field loss. It is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Open angle glaucoma (OAG), the commonest form of glaucoma, is a chronic condition that may or may not present with increased intraocular pressure (IOP). Neuroprotection for glaucoma refers to any intervention intended to prevent optic nerve damage or cell death.

Objectives

The objective of this review was to systematically examine the evidence regarding the effectiveness of neuroprotective agents for slowing the progression of OAG in adults.

Search methods

We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 9), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, (January 1950 to October 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 16 October 2012.

Selection criteria

We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which topical or oral treatments were used for neuroprotection in adults with OAG. Minimum follow up time was four years.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently reviewed titles and abstracts from the literature searches. Full-text copies of potentially relevant studies were obtained and re-evaluated for inclusion. Two review authors independently extracted data related study characteristics, risk of bias, and outcome data. One trial was identified for this review, thus we performed no meta-analysis. Two studies comparing memantine to placebo are currently awaiting classification until additional study details are provided. We documented reasons for excluding studies from the review.

Main results

We included one multi-center RCT of adults with low-pressure glaucoma (Low-pressure Glaucoma Treatment Study, LoGTS) conducted in the USA. The primary outcome was visual field progression after four years of treatment with either brimonidine or timolol. Of the 190 adults enrolled in the study, 12 (6.3%) were excluded after randomization and 77 (40.5%) did not complete four years of follow up. The rate of attrition was unbalanced between groups with more participants dropping out of the brimonidine group (55%) than the timolol group (29%). Of those remaining in the study at four years, participants assigned to brimonidine showed less visual field progression than participants assigned to timolol (5/45 participants in the brimonidine group compared with 18/56 participants in the timolol group). Since no information was available for the 12 participants excluded from the study, or the 77 participants who dropped out of the study, we cannot draw any conclusions from these results as the participants for whom data are missing may or may not have progressed. The mean IOP was similar in both groups at the four-year follow up among those for whom data were available: 14.2 mmHg (standard deviation (SD) = 1.9) among the 43 participants in the brimonidine group and 14.0 mmHg (SD = 2.6) among the 48 participants in the timolol group. Among the participants who developed progressive visual field loss, IOP reduction of 20% or greater was not significantly different between groups: 4/9 participants in the brimonidine group and 12/31 participants in the timolol group. The study authors did not report data for visual acuity or vertical cup-disc ratio. The most frequent adverse event was ocular allergy to study drug, which occurred more frequently in the brimonidine group (20/99 participants) than the timolol group (3/79 participants).

Authors' conclusions

Although neuroprotective agents are intended to act as pharmacological antagonists to prevent cell death, this trial did not provide evidence that they are effective in preventing retinal ganglion cell death, and thus preserving vision in people with OAG. Further clinical research is needed to determine whether neuroprotective agents may be beneficial for individuals with OAG. Such research should focus outcomes important to patients, such as preservation of vision, and how these outcomes relate to cell death and optic nerve damage. Since OAG is a chronic, progressive disease with variability in symptoms, RCTs designed to measure the effectiveness of neuroprotective agents would require long-term follow up (more than four years) in order to detect clinically meaningful effects.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Neuroprotection (medicines to protect nerves involved in sight) for treatment of glaucoma in adults

Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Glaucoma leads to damage of the optic nerve that worsens over time. Furthermore, cells in the retina that send messages to the optic nerve (retinal ganglion cells (RGCs)) become damaged and die off. This affects normal sight by blocking vision in the middle, sides, or top and bottom of a person’s view (loss of visual field). 

Medicines exist that might protect the optic nerve from damage and prevent the death of RGCs in people who have glaucoma. Treatment aiming to protect nerves is known as neuroprotection. These medicine(s) are prescribed for glaucoma in the hope of preventing or slowing vision loss by protecting the optic nerve. This review investigated whether these treatments really protect the optic nerve and RGCs, and prevent vision loss. 

We found one study that compared two different eyedrop treatments, given to two groups of adults with low-pressure glaucoma. One group received brimonidine, a neuroprotective drug. The other group received timolol, a drug that lowers fluid pressure in the eyes. The researchers followed these two groups for four years to see if either treatment really protected the optic nerve and prevented vision loss.

The study began with 99 people in the brimonidine group and 79 people in the timolol group. After four years, many of the people were no longer in the study: only 45 people (45%) remained in the brimonidine group and 56 (70%) people in the timolol group. Since so many people dropped out, and more drop-outs were taking brimonidine than timolol, it is difficult to interpret the results of the study. Bearing this in mind, after four years of treatment, people in the brimonidine group had kept more of their vision (40/45 or 88%) than those in the timolol group (38/56 or 67%). We do not know the results for the people who dropped out of the study.

Neither group showed any significant change in eye pressure (intraocular pressure). Information about visual sharpness (visual acuity) and the vertical cup-disc ratio (a measure of potential optic nerve damage) was not reported. The most common side-effect was an allergic reaction, in the eye, to the medicines that was experienced by 20/99 (20%) people in the brimonidine group and 3/79 (4%) people in the timolol group.

At present, there is not enough evidence to show whether medicines used to protect the optic nerve and optic cells work.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Neuroprotection pour le traitement du glaucome chez l'adulte

Contexte

Le glaucome est un groupe hétérogène d'affections se caractérisant par des lésions progressives sur le nerf optique, une détérioration des cellules ganglionnaires rétiniennes et enfin une perte du champ visuel. C'est une des principales causes de cécité dans le monde. Le glaucome à angle ouvert (GAO), la forme la plus courante de glaucome, est une affection chronique qui peut ou non se présenter avec une pression intraoculaire accrue (PIO). La neuroprotection du glaucome fait référence aux interventions destinées à prévenir les dommages du nerf optique ou la mort des cellules.

Objectifs

L'objectif de cette revue était d'examiner systématiquement les preuves concernant l'efficacité des agents neuroprotecteurs pour ralentir la progression d'un GAO chez l'adulte.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans CENTRAL (qui contient le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur l'ophtalmologie) (The Cochrane Library 2012, numéro 9), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (de janvier 1950 à octobre 2012), EMBASE (de janvier 1980 à octobre 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (de janvier 1982 à octobre 2012), le métaRegistre des essais contrôlés (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) et le système d'enregistrement international des essais cliniques de l'OMS (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/fr). Pour les recherches électroniques d'essais nous n'avons appliqué aucune restriction concernant la date ou la langue. Les dernières recherches dans les bases de données électroniques ont été effectuées le 16.10.12.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) dans lesquels les traitements topiques ou oraux étaient utilisés pour la neuroprotection chez les adultes avec un GAO. Le suivi durait au minimum quatre ans.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs on examiné, de manière indépendante, les titres et les résumés provenant des recherches de littérature. Les copies du texte intégral des études potentiellement pertinentes ont été obtenues et réévaluées pour inclusion. Deux auteurs ont extrait, de manière indépendante, les données associées aux caractéristiques de l'étude, au risque de biais et aux données des critères de jugement. Un seul essai a été identifié pour cette revue, nous n'avons donc pas réalisé de méta-analyse. Deux études comparant la mémantine à un placebo sont actuellement en attente de classification jusqu'à ce que des informations complémentaires soient fournies. Nous avons documenté les raisons motivant l'exclusion des études de la revue.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus un ECR multi-centrique composé d'adultes avec un glaucome à basse pression (Etude LoGTS - Low-Pressure Glaucoma Treatment Study) mené aux USA. Le critère de jugement principal était la progression du champ visuel après quatre ans de traitement avec du brimonidine ou du timolol. Sur les 190 adultes inscrits dans l'étude, 12 (6,3%) ont été exclus après randomisation et 77 (40,5 %) ne sont pas allés jusqu'au bout des quatre années de suivi. Le taux de sortie était déséquilibré entre les groupes avec plus de participants abandonnant dans le groupe sous brimonidine (55 %) que dans le groupe sous timolol (29 %). Sur ceux qui restaient dans l'étude au bout des quatre ans, les participants ayant reçu de la brimonidine ont montré une progression du champ visuel moins importante que les participants ayant reçu du timolol (5/45 participants dans le groupe sous brimonidine contre 18/56 participants dans le groupe sous timolol). Etant donné qu'aucune information n'était disponible pour les 12 participants exclus de l'étude, ou les 77 participants ayant abandonné l'étude, nous ne pouvons établir de conclusions à partir de ces résultats puisque les participants dont il manque les données peuvent ou non avoir progressé. La PIO moyenne était similaire dans les deux groupes après quatre années de suivi chez les participants dont les données étaient disponibles : 14,2 mmHg (écart standard (ES) = 1,9) chez les 43 participants du groupe sous brimonidine et 14,0 mmHg (ES = 2,6) chez les 48 participants du groupe sous timolol. Parmi les participants qui ont développé une perte progressive du champ visuel, la diminution de la PIO de 20 % ou plus n'était pas significativement différente entre les groupes : 4/9 participants du groupe sous brimonidine et 12/31 participants du groupe sous timolol. Les auteurs de l'étude n'ont pas mentionné de données concernant l'acuité visuelle ou le ratio vertical excavation/papille. L'évènement indésirable le plus fréquent était une allergie oculaire au médicament de l'étude, qui est apparue plus fréquemment dans le groupe sous brimonidine (20/99 participants) que dans le groupe sous timolol (3/79 participants).

Conclusions des auteurs

Bien que les agents neuroprotecteurs soient destinés à agir comme antagonistes pharmacologiques pour prévenir la mort des cellules, cet essai n'a pas fourni de preuves indiquant qu'ils sont efficaces pour prévenir la mort des cellules ganglionnaires rétiniennes, et ainsi préserver la vision des personnes souffrant d'un GAO. Des recherches cliniques complémentaires sont nécessaires pour déterminer si les agents neuroprotecteurs peuvent être bénéfiques aux personnes souffrant d'un GAO. Ces recherches devraient cibler les critères de jugement importants pour les patients, comme la préservation de la vision, et comment ces critères sont liés à la mort des cellules et aux dommages du nerf optique. Etant donné qu'un GAO est une maladie chronique et progressive avec des symptômes variables, les ECR conçus pour mesurer l'efficacité des agents neuroprotecteurs nécessiteront un suivi à long terme (plus de quatre ans) de manière à détecter les effets significatifs sur le plan clinique.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Neuroprotection pour le traitement du glaucome chez l'adulte

Neuroprotection (médicaments permettant de protéger les nerfs associés à la vue) pour le traitement du glaucome chez l'adulte

Le glaucome est une cause importante de cécité dans le monde. Le glaucome génère des lésions sur le nerf optique qui s'aggravent avec le temps. De plus, les cellules de la rétine qui envoient des messages au nerf optique (cellules ganglionnaires rétiniennes (CGR) s'abîment et meurent. Cela affecte la vision normale en bloquant le centre, les côtés, ou la partie supérieure et inférieure de la vue d'une personne (perte du champ visuel).

Des médicaments existent, ils peuvent protéger le nerf optique des lésions et prévenir la mort des CGR chez les personnes atteintes d'un glaucome. Le traitement visant à protéger les nerfs est connu sous le nom de neuroprotection. Ce(s) médicament(s) est(sont) prescrit(s) pour un glaucome dans l'espoir de prévenir ou ralentir la perte de vision en protégeant le nerf optique. Cette revue a examiné si ces traitements protègent réellement le nerf optique et les CGR, et préviennent la perte de vision.

Nous avons trouvé une étude qui comparait deux traitements différents sous forme de gouttes, donnés à deux groupes d'adultes avec un glaucome à faible pression. Un groupe a reçu de la brimonidine, un médicament neuroprotecteur. L'autre groupe a reçu du timolol, un médicament qui diminue la pression du liquide oculaire. Les enquêteurs ont suivi ces deux groupes pendant quatre ans pour voir si un des traitements protégeait réellement le nerf optique et prévenait la perte de vision.

L'étude a commencé avec 99 participants dans le groupe sous brimonidine et 79 participants dans le groupe sous timolol. Après quatre ans, de nombreuses personnes ne faisaient plus partie de l'étude : seulement 45 participants (45 %) dans le groupe sous brimonidine et 56 (70 %) dans le groupe sous timolol. Etant donné qu'un nombre important de participants avaient abandonné, et qu'il y avait plus d'abandons avec le brimonidine qu'avec le timolol, il est difficile d'interpréter les résultats de l'étude. En gardant cela à l'esprit, après quatre années de traitement, les personnes du groupe sous brimonidine avaient conservé une meilleure vision (40/45 ou 88 %) que celles du groupe sous timolol (38/56 ou 67 %). Nous ne connaissons pas les résultats pour les personnes qui ont quitté l'étude.

Il n'a été observé aucun changement significatif de la pression oculaire (pression intraoculaire) dans l'un ou l'autre des groupes. Les informations relatives à l'acuité visuelle et au ratio vertical excavation/papille (une mesure des dommages potentiels sur le nerf optique) n'étaient pas indiquées. Les effets secondaires les plus courants étaient une réaction allergique, dans l'œil, aux médicaments ressentie par 20/99 (20 %) des personnes du groupe sous brimonidine et 3/79 (4 %) des personnes du groupe sous timolol.

Actuellement, il n'existe pas suffisamment de données permettant d'indiquer si les médicaments utilisés pour protéger le nerf optique et les cellules optiques fonctionnent.

Notes de traduction

Jusqu'au Numéro 2, 2012 de The Cochrane Library: - Cette revue a remplacé la revue publiée : Sycha T, Vass C, Findl O, Bauer P, Groke I, Schmetterer L, Eichler HG. Interventions for normal tension glaucoma. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2003, Issue 1. - La revue de Sycha et al. a été retirée de la publication dans la Database of Systematic Reviews.

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Ministère de la Santé. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada, ministère de la Santé du Québec, Fonds de recherche de Québec-Santé et Institut national d'excellence en santé et en services sociaux.