Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Interventions to improve professional adherence to guidelines for prevention of device-related infections

  1. Gerd Flodgren1,*,
  2. Lucieni O Conterno2,
  3. Alain Mayhew3,
  4. Omar Omar4,
  5. Cresio Romeu Pereira5,
  6. Sasha Shepperd1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group

Published Online: 28 MAR 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 16 JUL 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006559.pub2


How to Cite

Flodgren G, Conterno LO, Mayhew A, Omar O, Pereira CR, Shepperd S. Interventions to improve professional adherence to guidelines for prevention of device-related infections. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD006559. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006559.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Oxford, Department of Public Health, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK

  2. 2

    Marilia Medical School, Department of General Internal Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Marilia, São Paulo, Brazil

  3. 3

    Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, The Ottawa Hospital - General Campus, Centre for Practice-Changing Research, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

  4. 4

    Centre for Statistics in Medicine, Oxford, UK

  5. 5

    Municipal Health Department, Infection Control, Ilhabela, SP, Brazil

*Gerd Flodgren, Department of Public Health, University of Oxford, Rosemary Rue Building, Old Road Campus, Headington, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX3 7LF, UK. gerd.flodgren@dph.ox.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 28 MAR 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are a major threat to patient safety, and are associated with mortality rates varying from 5% to 35%. Important risk factors associated with HAIs are the use of invasive medical devices (e.g. central lines, urinary catheters and mechanical ventilators), and poor staff adherence to infection prevention practices during insertion and care for the devices when in place. There are specific risk profiles for each device, but in general, the breakdown of aseptic technique during insertion and care for the device, as well as the duration of device use, are important factors for the development of these serious and costly infections.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of different interventions, alone or in combination, which target healthcare professionals or healthcare organisations to improve professional adherence to infection control guidelines on device-related infection rates and measures of adherence.

Search methods

We searched the following electronic databases for primary studies up to June 2012: the Cochrane Effective Paractice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL. We searched reference lists and contacted authors of included studies. We also searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE) for related reviews.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised controlled trials (NRCTs), controlled before-after (CBA) studies and interrupted time series (ITS) studies that complied with the Cochrane EPOC Group methodological criteria, and that evaluated interventions to improve professional adherence to guidelines for the prevention of device-related infections.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of each included study using the Cochrane EPOC 'Risk of bias' tool. We contacted authors of original papers to obtain missing information.

Main results

We included 13 studies: one cluster randomised controlled trial (CRCT) and 12 ITS studies, involving 40 hospitals, 51 intensive care units (ICUs), 27 wards, and more than 3504 patients and 1406 healthcare professionals. Six of the included studies targeted adherence to guidelines to prevent central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs); another six studies targeted adherence to guidelines to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and one study focused on interventions to improve urinary catheter practices. We judged all included studies to be at moderate or high risk of bias.

The largest median effect on rates of VAP was found at nine months follow-up with a decrease of 7.36 (-10.82 to 3.14) cases per 1000 ventilator days (five studies and 15 sites). The one included cluster randomised controlled trial (CRCT) observed, improved urinary catheter practices five weeks after the intervention (absolute difference 12.2 percentage points), however, the statistical significance of this is unknown given a unit of analysis error. It is worth noting that N = 6 interventions that did result in significantly decreased infection rates involved more than one active intervention, which in some cases, was repeatedly administered over time, and further, that one intervention involving specialised oral care personnel showed the largest step change (-22.9 cases per 1000 ventilator days (standard error (SE) 4.0), and also the largest slope change (-6.45 cases per 1000 ventilator days (SE 1.42, P = 0.002)) among the included studies. We attempted to combine the results for studies targeting the same indwelling medical device (central line catheters or mechanical ventilators) and reporting the same outcomes (CLABSI and VAP rate) in two separate meta-analyses, but due to very high statistical heterogeneity among included studies (I2 up to 97%), we did not retain these analyses. Six of the included studies reported post-intervention adherence scores ranging from 14% to 98%. The effect on rates of infection were mixed and the effect sizes were small, with the largest median effect for the change in level (interquartile range (IQR)) for the six CLABSI studies being observed at three months follow-up was a decrease of 0.6 (-2.74 to 0.28) cases per 1000 central line days (six studies and 36 sites). This change was not sustained over longer follow-up times.

Authors' conclusions

The low to very low quality of the evidence of studies included in this review provides insufficient evidence to determine with certainty which interventions are most effective in changing professional behaviour and in what contexts. However, interventions that may be worth further study are educational interventions involving more than one active element and that are repeatedly administered over time, and interventions employing specialised personnel, who are focused on an aspect of care that is supported by evidence e.g. dentists/dental auxiliaries performing oral care for VAP prevention.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Can interventions to improve professional adherence to guidelines prevent device-related infections?

Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are a major threat to patient safety, and are associated with mortality rates varying from 5% to 35%. Important risk factors associated with HAIs are the use of invasive medical devices (e.g. central lines, urinary catheters and mechanical ventilators) that breach the body's normal defence mechanisms, and poor staff adherence to infection prevention practices during insertion and care for the devices when in place.

We identified 13 studies: one cluster randomised controlled trial (CRCT) and 12 interrupted time series (ITS) studies, involving 40 hospitals, 51 intensive care units (ICUs), 27 wards and more than 1406 healthcare professionals and 3504 patients, which assessed the impact of different interventions to reduce the occurrence of device-related infections for inclusion in this review. We judged all studies to be at moderate to high risk of bias.

The effect sizes were small with the largest median effect for studies addressing central line associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs) occurring immediately after the implementation of an intervention to improve adherence to guidelines, in the majority of studies this change was not sustained over longer follow-up times. The median effect for studies aiming to reduce ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) was somewhat greater and was sustained up to 12 months follow-up. The results of six studies that reported adherence/non-adherence with infection control recommendations showed very varying adherence scores ranging from 14% to 98%.

The low to very low quality of the evidence of the studies included in this review provides insufficient evidence to determine with certainty which interventions are most effective in changing professional behaviour and in what contexts. However, interventions that may be worth further study are educational interventions consisting of more than one active element and that are repeatedly administered over time, and interventions employing dedicated personnel, who are focused on a certain aspect of care that is supported by evidence e.g. dentists/dental auxiliaries providing oral care. If healthcare organisations and policy makers wish to improve professional adherence to guidelines for the prevention of device-related infections, funding of well designed studies to generate high quality evidence is needed to guide policy.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions visant à améliorer le respect professionnel des directives en matière de prévention des infections liées aux dispositifs médicaux

Contexte

Les infections liées aux soins de santé (ILSS) constituent une menace majeure pour la sécurité des patients et sont associées à des taux de mortalité allant de 5 % à 35 %. Les facteurs de risque importants associés aux ILSS sont l'utilisation de dispositifs médicaux invasifs (par exemple cathéters centraux, cathéters urinaires et dispositifs de ventilation mécanique), et le manque de respect de la part du personnel des pratiques en matière de prévention lors de l'insertion des dispositifs et lors de leur entretien une fois en place. Chaque dispositif présente un profil de risque spécifique, mais en général, le non-respect de la technique aseptique lors de l'insertion et de l'entretien du dispositif et le non-respect de la durée d'utilisation du dispositif sont des facteurs importants de développement de ces infections graves et coûteuses.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité des différentes interventions, seules ou en combinaison, qui ciblent les professionnels de santé ou les organismes de soins de santé dans le but d'améliorer le respect professionnel des directives en matière de contrôle des infections sur le taux d'infections liées aux dispositifs médicaux et les mesures du respect.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans les bases de données électroniques suivantes pour les études originales jusqu'à juin 2012 : le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur l'efficacité des pratiques et l'organisation des soins (EPOC), le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés - Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE et CINAHL. Nous avons effectué une recherche dans les listes de références et contacté les auteurs des études incluses. Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans la base de données Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews et la base de données DARE (Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness) pour trouver des revues connexes.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), des essais contrôlés non randomisés (ECNR), des études contrôlées avant-après (CAA) et des études de séries temporelles interrompues (STI) qui remplissaient les critères méthodologiques du groupe Cochrane EPOC, et qui évaluaient les interventions visant à améliorer le respect professionnel des directives en matière de prévention des infections liées aux dispositifs médicaux.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais de chaque étude incluse en utilisant l'outil « Risque de biais » du groupe Cochrane EPOC. Nous avons contacté les auteurs des articles originaux afin d’obtenir les informations manquantes.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 13 études : un essai contrôlé randomisé en grappes (ECRG) et 12 études STI, portant sur 40 hôpitaux, 51 unités de soins intensifs (USI), 27 salles de soins et plus de 3 504 patients et 1 406 professionnels de santé. Six des études incluses portaient sur le respect des directives visant à prévenir les infections de la circulation sanguine associées à un cathéter central (ICSACC) ; six autres études portaient sur le respect des directives visant à prévenir la pneumonie sous ventilation assistée (PVA), et une étude était axée sur les interventions visant à améliorer les pratiques en matière de cathéters urinaires. Nous avons jugé que toutes les études incluses présentaient un risque de biais modéré ou élevé.

L'effet médian le plus important sur les taux de PVA a été observé après neuf mois de suivi avec une diminution de 7,36 (-10,82 à 3,14) cas pour 1 000 jours sous ventilation (cinq études et 15 sites). L'unique essai contrôlé randomisé en grappes (ECRG) inclus a observé une amélioration des pratiques en matière de cathéters urinaires cinq semaines après l'intervention (différence absolue 12,2 points de pourcentage). Cependant, la signification statistique de ces données est inconnue en raison d'une erreur dans l’unité d’analyse. Il convient de noter que N = 6 interventions qui donnaient des taux d'infection significativement réduits portaient sur plus d'une intervention active, qui dans certains cas, était administrée régulièrement, et par ailleurs, qu'une intervention portant sur du personnel spécialisé dans les soins bucco-dentaires a montré le changement progressif le plus important (-22,9 cas pour 1 000 jours sous ventilation (erreur standard (SE) 4,0), et également le changement brutal le plus important (-6,45 cas pour 1 000 jours sous ventilation (SE 1,42, P = 0,002)) parmi les études incluses. Nous avons essayé de combiner les résultats des études portant sur le même dispositif médical à demeure (cathéters centraux ou dispositifs de ventilation mécanique) et présentant les mêmes résultats (taux d'ICSACC et de PVA) dans deux méta-analyses distinctes, mais en raison de l'hétérogénéité statistique très élevée parmi les études incluses (I2 jusqu'à 97 %), nous n'avons pas retenu ces analyses. Six des études incluses indiquaient des scores de respect post-intervention compris entre 14 % et 98 %. L'effet sur les taux d'infection était mitigé et les effets étaient d'une ampleur réduite, l'effet médian le plus important pour le changement de niveau (intervalle interquartile (IQR)) dans les six études sur les ICSACC étant observé après trois mois de suivi était une réduction de 0,6 (-2,74 à 0,28) cas pour 1 000 jours sous cathétérisation (six études et 36 sites). Ce changement ne persistait pas sur des périodes de suivi plus longues.

Conclusions des auteurs

La qualité faible à très faible des données des études incluses dans cette revue ne fournit pas suffisamment de preuves pour déterminer avec certitude quelles sont les interventions les plus efficaces pour modifier le comportement professionnel, et dans quels contextes. Cependant, les interventions qui peuvent justifier des recherches supplémentaires sont les interventions éducatives comportant plus d'un élément actif et qui sont administrées régulièrement, et les interventions employant un personnel spécialisé, qui sont axées sur un certain aspect des soins qui est corroboré par les faits, par exemple dentistes/auxiliaires dentaires dispensant des soins bucco-dentaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions visant à améliorer le respect professionnel des directives en matière de prévention des infections liées aux dispositifs médicaux

Les interventions visant à améliorer le respect professionnel des directives peuvent-elles prévenir les infections liées aux dispositifs médicaux ?

Les infections liées aux soins de santé (ILSS) constituent une menace majeure pour la sécurité des patients, et sont associées à des taux de mortalité allant de 5 % à 35 %. Les facteurs de risque importants associés aux ILSS sont l'utilisation de dispositifs médicaux invasifs (par exemple cathéters centraux, cathéters urinaires et dispositifs de ventilation mécanique) qui perturbent les mécanismes de défense normaux de l'organisme, et le manque de respect de la part du personnel des pratiques en matière de prévention des infections lors de l'insertion des dispositifs et lors de leur entretien une fois en place.

Nous avons identifié 13 études : un essai contrôlé randomisé en grappes (ECRG) et 12 études de séries temporelles interrompues (STI), portant sur 40 hôpitaux, 51 unités de soins intensifs (USI), 27 salles de soins et plus de 1 406 professionnels de santé et 3 504 patients, qui évaluaient l'impact des différentes interventions destinées à réduire l'occurrence des infections liées aux dispositifs médicaux pouvant être inclus dans cette revue. Nous avons jugé que toutes les études présentaient un risque de biais modéré à élevé.

L'ampleur des effets était réduite, l'effet médian le plus important pour les études sur les infections de la circulation sanguine associées à un cathéter central (ICSACC) se produisant immédiatement après la mise en œuvre d'une intervention visant à améliorer le respect des directives. Dans la majorité des études, ce changement ne perdurait pas sur des périodes de suivi plus longues. L'effet médian pour les études visant à réduire la pneumonie sous ventilation assistée (PVA) était légèrement plus important et perdurait jusqu'à 12 mois de suivi. Les résultats de six études qui présentaient le respect/non-respect des recommandations en matière de contrôle des infections indiquaient des scores de respect très variables allant de 14 % à 98 %.

La qualité faible à très faible des données des études incluses dans cette revue ne fournit pas suffisamment de preuves pour déterminer avec certitude quelles sont les interventions les plus efficaces pour modifier le comportement professionnel, et dans quels contextes. Cependant, les interventions qui peuvent justifier des recherches supplémentaires sont les interventions éducatives comportant plus d'un élément actif et qui sont administrées régulièrement, et les interventions employant un personnel spécialisé, qui sont axées sur un certain aspect des soins qui est corroboré par les faits, par exemple dentistes/auxiliaires dentaires dispensant des soins bucco-dentaires. Si les organismes de soins de santé et les décideurs politiques souhaitent améliorer le respect professionnel des directives en matière de prévention des infections liées aux dispositifs médicaux, un financement d'études bien conçues pour produire des preuves de grande qualité est nécessaire afin d'orienter la politique.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 5th April, 2013
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux pour la France: Minist�re en charge de la Sant�