Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Aripiprazole versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

  1. Priya Khanna1,
  2. Tao Suo2,*,
  3. Katja Komossa3,
  4. Huaixing Ma4,
  5. Christine Rummel-Kluge5,
  6. Hany George El-Sayeh6,
  7. Stefan Leucht7,
  8. Jun Xia8

Editorial Group: Cochrane Schizophrenia Group

Published Online: 2 JAN 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 24 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006569.pub5


How to Cite

Khanna P, Suo T, Komossa K, Ma H, Rummel-Kluge C, El-Sayeh HG, Leucht S, Xia J. Aripiprazole versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD006569. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006569.pub5.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, Early Intervention Psychosis, Newcastle, UK

  2. 2

    Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Department of General Surgery, Institute of General Surgery, Shanghai, Shanghai, China

  3. 3

    University Hospital of Zurich, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Zurich, Switzerland

  4. 4

    Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Department of Medical Oncology, Shanghai, China

  5. 5

    University of Leipzig, Clinic and Outpatient Clinic of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Leipzig, Saxony, Germany

  6. 6

    Harrogate District Hospital, Briary Wing, Harrogate, West Yorkshire, UK

  7. 7

    Technische Universität München Klinikum rechts der Isar, Klinik und Poliklinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, München, Germany

  8. 8

    Systematic Review Solutions Ltd, Yan Tai, China

*Tao Suo, Department of General Surgery, Institute of General Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 180 Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai, Shanghai, 200032, China. simonsuo@aliyun.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 2 JAN 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

In most western industrialised countries, second generation (atypical) antipsychotics are recommended as first-line drug treatments for people with schizophrenia. In this review, we specifically examine how the efficacy and tolerability of one such agent - aripiprazole - differs from that of other comparable second generation antipsychotics.

Objectives

To review the effects of aripiprazole compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (November 2012), inspected references of all identified studies for further trials and contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies, drug approval agencies and authors of trials for additional information.

Selection criteria

We included all randomised clinical trials (RCTs) comparing aripiprazole (oral) with oral and parenteral forms of amisulpride, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses.

Data collection and analysis

We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. Where possible, we calculated illustrative comparative risks for primary outcomes. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD), again based on a random-effects model. We assessed risk of bias for each included study and used GRADE approach to rate quality of evidence.

Main results

We now have included 174 trials involving 17,244 participants. Aripiprazole was compared with clozapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone and olanzapine. The overall number of participants leaving studies early was 30% to 40%, limiting validity (no differences between groups).

When compared with clozapine, there were no significant differences for global state (no clinically significant response, n = 2132, 29 RCTs, low quality evidence); mental state (BPRS, n = 426, 5 RCTs, very low quality evidence); or leaving the study early for any reason (n = 240, 3 RCTs, very low quality evidence). Quality of life score using the WHO-QOL-100 scale demonstrated significant difference, favouring aripiprazole (n = 132, 2 RCTs, RR 2.59 CI 1.43 to 3.74, very low quality evidence). General extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) were no different between groups (n = 520, 8 RCTs,very low quality evidence). No study reported general functioning or service use.

When compared with quetiapine, there were no significant differences for global state (n = 991, 12 RCTs, low quality evidence); mental state (PANSS positive symptoms, n = 583, 7 RCTs, very low quality evidence); leaving the study early for any reason (n = 168, 2 RCTs, very low quality evidence), or general EPS symptoms (n = 348, 4 RCTs, very low quality evidence). Results were significantly in favour of aripiprazole for quality of life (WHO-QOL-100 total score, n = 100, 1 RCT, MD 2.60 CI 1.31 to 3.89, very low quality evidence). No study reported general functioning or service use.

When compared with risperidone, there were no significant differences for global state (n = 6381, 80 RCTs, low quality evidence); or leaving the study early for any reason (n = 1239, 12 RCTs, very low quality evidence). Data were significantly in favour of aripiprazole for improvement in mental state using the BPRS (n = 570, 5 RCTs, MD 1.33 CI 2.24 to 0.42, very low quality evidence); with higher adverse effects seen in participants receiving risperidone of general EPS symptoms (n = 2605, 31 RCTs, RR 0.39 CI 0.31 to 0.50, low quality evidence). No study reported general functioning, quality of life or service use.

When compared with ziprasidone, there were no significant differences for global state (n = 442, 6 RCTs, very low quality evidence); mental state using the BPRS (n = 247, 1 RCT, very low quality evidence); or leaving the study early for any reason (n = 316, 2 RCTs, very low quality evidence). Weight gain was significantly greater in people receiving aripiprazole (n = 232, 3 RCTs, RR 4.01 CI 1.10 to 14.60, very low quality evidence). No study reported general functioning, quality of life or service use.

When compared with olanzapine, there were no significant differences for global state (n = 1739, 11 RCTs, very low quality evidence); mental state using PANSS (n = 1500, 11 RCTs, very low quality evidence); or quality of life using the GQOLI-74 scale (n = 68, 1 RCT, very low quality of evidence). Significantly more people receiving aripiprazole left the study early due to any reason (n = 2331, 9 RCTs, RR 1.15 CI 1.05 to 1.25, low quality evidence) and significantly more people receiving olanzapine gained weight (n = 1538, 9 RCTs, RR 0.25 CI 0.15 to 0.43, very low quality evidence). None of the included studies provided outcome data for the comparisons of 'service use' or 'general functioning'.

Authors' conclusions

Information on all comparisons is of limited quality, is incomplete and problematic to apply clinically. The quality of the evidence is all low or very low. Aripiprazole is an antipsychotic drug with an important adverse effect profile. Long-term data are sparse and there is considerable scope for another update of this review as new data emerge from ongoing larger, independent pragmatic trials.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Aripiprazole versus other atypical antipsychotics

In many countries in the industrialised world there has been a huge growth in the prescription of medication for people with mental health problems, taken orally as a tablet or by injection. Atypical and second generation antipsychotic drugs have become ever more popular, because they are thought to help people with mental health problems who do not respond quite so well to initial treatment. These newer drugs hold the promise of both reducing symptoms, such as hearing voices or seeing things, and reducing problematic side effects, such as sleepiness, weight gain, and shaking.

However, there is little research and comparison of the ways in which drugs differ from one another. This review examines the effectiveness of aripiprazole with other new antipsychotics.

Originally the review included 12 research trials. After an update search carried out in November 2012, 162 trials were added. Most of these trials were from China and although new data were added to the review, overall conclusions did not change. The review now has five comparisons with aripiprazole being compared with clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and ziprasidone.

For people with schizophrenia it may be important to know that aripiprazole may not be as good or effective as olanzapine but that it has less side effects. Aripiprazole is similar in effectiveness to risperidone and somewhat better than ziprasidone. Aripiprazole had less side- effects than olanzapine and risperidone (such as weight gain, sleepiness, heart problems, shaking and increased cholesterol levels). Aripiprazole was not as good as ziprasidone for dealing with restlessness or people’s inability to sit still. Comparison with other antipsychotic drugs as a group showed that people preferred taking aripiprazole. However, people with schizophrenia as well as mental health professionals and policy makers should know that the evidence is limited and mostly of low or very low quality. More trials and research is required, including on outcomes such as: quality of life; the views of service users and carers; and patient preference.

This plain language summary has been written by a consumer from Rethink Mental Illness, Benjamin Gray. Email: ben.gray@rethink.org

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Aripiprazole versus autres antipsychotiques atypiques dans le traitement de la schizophrénie

Contexte

Dans la plupart des pays industrialisés occidentaux, les antipsychotiques de deuxième génération (atypiques) sont recommandés en tant que traitements médicamenteux de première ligne pour les personnes atteintes de schizophrénie. Dans cette revue, nous avons spécifiquement examiné l'efficacité et la tolérabilité de l'un de ces agents – l'aripiprazole - par rapport à d'autres antipsychotiques de deuxième génération comparables.

Objectifs

Faire la revue des effets de l'aripiprazole par rapport à d'autres antipsychotiques atypiques chez les patients atteints de schizophrénie et de psychoses apparentées.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur la schizophrénie (novembre 2012), examiné les références bibliographiques de toutes les études identifiées pour obtenir des essais et contacté les sociétés pharmaceutiques concernées, les agences d'approbation des médicaments et les auteurs des essais pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus tous les essais cliniques randomisés (ECR) comparant l'aripiprazole (par voie orale) les formes orales et parentérales de l'amisulpride, la clozapine, l'olanzapine, la quétiapine, la rispéridone, le sertindole, la ziprasidone et la zotépine chez des patients atteints de schizophrénie ou de psychoses apparentées.

Recueil et analyse des données

Les données ont été extraites indépendamment. Pour les données dichotomiques, nous avons calculé les rapports de risque (RR) et leurs intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95%, sur une base d'intention de traiter à partir d'un modèle à effets aléatoires. Lorsque cela était possible, nous avons calculé des risques significatifs comparatifs pour les critères de jugement principaux. Pour les données continues, nous avons calculé, les différences moyennes (DMP), de nouveau sur la base d'un modèle à effets aléatoires. Nous avons évalué le risque de biais pour chaque étude incluse et utilisé l'approche GRADE pour évaluer la qualité des preuves.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons maintenant inclus 174 essais impliquant 17244 participants. L'aripiprazole était comparée à la clozapine, la quétiapine, la rispéridone, la ziprasidone et l'olanzapine. Le nombre total de participants abandonnant les études prématurément était de 30 % à 40%, ce qui limite la validité (pas de différences entre les groupes).

Par rapport à la clozapine, il n'y avait aucune différence significative concernant l'état général (pas de réponse cliniquement significative, n = 2132, 29 ECR, preuves de faible qualité; l'état mental (score BPRS, n = 426, 5 ECR, preuves de très faible qualité); ou les arrêts prématurés toutes raisons confondues (n = 240, 3 ECR, preuves de très faible qualité). Le score de qualité de vie à l'aide de l'échelle WHO-QOL-100 a montré une différence significative, en faveur de l'aripiprazole (n = 132, 2 ECR, RR 2,59 IC entre 1,43 et 3,74, preuves de très faible qualité). Les symptômes extrapyramidaux (SE) n'étaient pas différents entre les groupes (n = 520, 8 ECR , preuves de très faible qualité). Aucune étude n'a rapporté le fonctionnement global ou l'utilisation des services.

Par rapport à la quétiapine, il n'y avait aucune différence significative concernant l'état général (n = 991, 12 ECR, preuves de très faible qualité); l'état mental (les symptômes positifs PANSS, n = 583, 7 ECR, preuves de très faible qualité); l'abandon précoce de l'étude toutes raisons confondues (n = 168, 2 ECR, preuves de très faible qualité), les symptômes extrapyramidaux (n = 348, 4 ECR, preuves de très faible qualité). Les résultats ont été significativement en faveur de l'aripiprazole pour la qualité de vie (WHO-QOL-100 score total, n = 100, 1 ECR, DM 2,60 IC entre 1,31 et 3,89, preuves de très faible qualité). Aucune étude n'a rapporté le fonctionnement global ou l'utilisation des services.

Par rapport à la rispéridone, il n'y avait aucune différence significative concernant l'état général (n = 6381, 80 ECR, preuves de faible qualité) ou les arrêts prématurés toutes raisons confondues (n = 1239, 12 ECR, preuves de très faible qualité). Les données ont été significativement en faveur de l'aripiprazole pour l'amélioration de l'état mental en utilisant le score BPRS (n = 570, 5 ECR, DM 1,33 IC entre 2,24 et 0,42, preuves de très faible qualité); avec une augmentation plus importante des effets indésirables constatés chez les participants recevant de la rispéridone en ce qui concerne les symptômes extrapyramidaux (n = 2605, 31 ECR, RR de 0,39, IC entre 0,31 et 0,50, preuves de faible qualité). Aucune étude n'a rapporté le fonctionnement global, la qualité de vie ou l'utilisation des services.

Par rapport à la ziprasidone, il n'y avait aucune différence significative concernant l'état général (n = 442, 6 ECR, preuves de très faible qualité); l'état mental en utilisant le score BPRS (n = 247, 1 ECR, preuves de très faible qualité) et les arrêts prématurés toutes raisons confondues (n = 316, 2 ECR, preuves de très faible qualité). La prise de poids était significativement supérieure chez les personnes recevant de l'aripiprazole (n = 232, 3 ECR, RR 4,01 IC entre 1,10 et 14,60, preuves de très faible qualité). Aucune étude n'a rapporté le fonctionnement global, la qualité de vie ou l'utilisation des services.

Comparé à l'olanzapine, il n'y avait aucune différence significative concernant l'état général (n = 1739, 11 ECR, preuves de très faible qualité), l'état mental à l'échelle PANSS (n = 1500, 11 ECR, preuves de très faible qualité) ou la qualité de vie à l'aide de l'échelle GQOLI-74 (n = 68, 1 ECR, preuves de très faible qualité). Significativement plus de personnes recevant de l'aripiprazole abandonnaient l'étude prématurément pour une raison quelconque (n = 2331, 9 ECR, RR de 1,15, IC entre 1,05 et 1,25, preuves de faible qualité) et significativement plus de personnes recevant de l'olanzapine prenaient du poids (n = 1538, 9 ECR, RR 0,25 IC entre 0,15 et 0,43, preuves de très faible qualité). Aucune des études incluses ne rapportait des données de résultats pour les comparaisons de « l'utilisation des services » ou du «fonctionnement global».

Conclusions des auteurs

Les informations sur toutes les comparaisons sont de qualité limitée, incomplètes et problématiques pour être appliquées cliniquement. La qualité des preuves est, pour l'ensemble, faible ou très faible. L'aripiprazole est un médicament antipsychotique avec des effets indésirables importants. Les données à long terme sont rares laissant un champ considérable pour une nouvelle mise à jour de cette revue lorsque de nouvelles données émergeront d'essais en cours de plus grande taille, indépendants et pragmatiques.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Aripiprazole versus autres antipsychotiques atypiques dans le traitement de la schizophrénie

Aripiprazole versus autres antipsychotiques atypiques

Dans de nombreux pays industrialisés, il y a eu une énorme croissance de la prescription de médicaments pour les personnes souffrant de problèmes de santé mentale, pris par voie orale en comprimé ou par injection. Les antipsychotiques dits atypiques ou de deuxième génération sont devenus de plus en plus populaires, car ils sont supposés aider les personnes souffrant de problèmes de santé mentale qui ne répondent pas assez bien à un traitement initial. Ces nouveaux médicaments maintiennent l'espoir de réduire les symptômes, tels que le fait d'entendre des voix ou de voir des choses et de réduire les effets secondaires, tels que la somnolence, la prise de poids et les tremblements.

Cependant, il existe peu de recherches et de comparaisons sur la manière dont les médicaments diffèrent les uns des autres. Cette revue examine l'efficacité de l'aripiprazole par rapport à d'autres nouveaux antipsychotiques.

La revue d'origine incluait 12 essais de recherche. Après une recherche de mise à jour effectuée en novembre 2012, 162 essais ont été ajoutés. La plupart de ces essais provenaient de Chine et bien que de nouvelles données ont été ajoutées à la revue, dans l'ensemble les conclusions n'ont pas changé. La revue comporte maintenant cinq comparaisons avec l'aripiprazole par rapport à la clozapine, l'olanzapine, la quétiapine, la rispéridone et la ziprasidone.

Pour les personnes atteintes de schizophrénie il peut être important de savoir que l'aripiprazole pourrait ne pas être aussi bénéfique ou efficace que l'olanzapine mais qu'elle provoque moins d'effets secondaires. L'aripiprazole est similaire dans l'efficacité à la rispéridone et légèrement plus efficace que la ziprasidone. L'aripiprazole a moins d'effets secondaires que l'olanzapine et la rispéridone (tels que la prise de poids, la somnolence, les problèmes cardiaques, les tremblements et l"augmentation des niveaux de cholestérol). L'aripiprazole n'était pas aussi efficace que la ziprasidone pour lutter contre l'agitation ou l'incapacité à rester tranquille. La comparaison avec d'autres médicaments antipsychotiques en tant que groupe a montré que les personnes ont préféré l’aripiprazole. Cependant, les personnes atteintes de schizophrénie ainsi que les professionnels de santé mentale et les décideurs politiques devraient savoir que les preuves sont limitées et généralement de qualité faible ou très faible. D'autres essais et recherches sont nécessaires, notamment sur les critères de jugement, tels que : la qualité de vie; le point de vue des patients et des soignants et la préférence du patient.

Ce résumé en langage simplifié a été rédigé par un usager de Rethink Mental Illness, Benjamin Gray. Email: ben.gray@rethink.org

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 7th July, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé