Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Virtual reality training for surgical trainees in laparoscopic surgery

  1. Myura Nagendran1,
  2. Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy2,*,
  3. Rajesh Aggarwal3,
  4. Marilena Loizidou4,
  5. Brian R Davidson2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group

Published Online: 27 AUG 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 21 JUL 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006575.pub3


How to Cite

Nagendran M, Gurusamy KS, Aggarwal R, Loizidou M, Davidson BR. Virtual reality training for surgical trainees in laparoscopic surgery. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD006575. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006575.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Surgery, UCL Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, London, UK

  2. 2

    Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Department of Surgery, London, UK

  3. 3

    Imperial College London, Department of Biosurgery and Surgical Technology, London, UK

  4. 4

    Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Surgery and Interventional Science, London, UK

*Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy, Department of Surgery, Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Royal Free Hospital,, Rowland Hill Street, London, NW3 2PF, UK. kurinchi2k@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 27 AUG 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Standard surgical training has traditionally been one of apprenticeship, where the surgical trainee learns to perform surgery under the supervision of a trained surgeon. This is time-consuming, costly, and of variable effectiveness. Training using a virtual reality simulator is an option to supplement standard training. Virtual reality training improves the technical skills of surgical trainees such as decreased time for suturing and improved accuracy. The clinical impact of virtual reality training is not known.

Objectives

To assess the benefits (increased surgical proficiency and improved patient outcomes) and harms (potentially worse patient outcomes) of supplementary virtual reality training of surgical trainees with limited laparoscopic experience.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Science Citation Index Expanded until July 2012.

Selection criteria

We included all randomised clinical trials comparing virtual reality training versus other forms of training including box-trainer training, no training, or standard laparoscopic training in surgical trainees with little laparoscopic experience. We also planned to include trials comparing different methods of virtual reality training. We included only trials that assessed the outcomes in people undergoing laparoscopic surgery.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently identified trials and collected data. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using Review Manager 5 analysis. For each outcome we calculated the mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals based on intention-to-treat analysis.

Main results

We included eight trials covering 109 surgical trainees with limited laparoscopic experience. Of the eight trials, six compared virtual reality versus no supplementary training. One trial compared virtual reality training versus box-trainer training and versus no supplementary training, and one trial compared virtual reality training versus box-trainer training. There were no trials that compared different forms of virtual reality training. All the trials were at high risk of bias. Operating time and operative performance were the only outcomes reported in the trials. The remaining outcomes such as mortality, morbidity, quality of life (the primary outcomes of this review) and hospital stay (a secondary outcome) were not reported.

Virtual reality training versus no supplementary training: The operating time was significantly shorter in the virtual reality group than in the no supplementary training group (3 trials; 49 participants; MD -11.76 minutes; 95% CI -15.23 to -8.30). Two trials that could not be included in the meta-analysis also showed a reduction in operating time (statistically significant in one trial). The numerical values for operating time were not reported in these two trials. The operative performance was significantly better in the virtual reality group than the no supplementary training group using the fixed-effect model (2 trials; 33 participants; SMD 1.65; 95% CI 0.72 to 2.58). The results became non-significant when the random-effects model was used (2 trials; 33 participants; SMD 2.14; 95% CI -1.29 to 5.57). One trial could not be included in the meta-analysis as it did not report the numerical values. The authors stated that the operative performance of virtual reality group was significantly better than the control group.

Virtual reality training versus box-trainer training: The only trial that reported operating time did not report the numerical values. In this trial, the operating time in the virtual reality group was significantly shorter than in the box-trainer group. Of the two trials that reported operative performance, only one trial reported the numerical values. The operative performance was significantly better in the virtual reality group than in the box-trainer group (1 trial; 19 participants; SMD 1.46; 95% CI 0.42 to 2.50). In the other trial that did not report the numerical values, the authors stated that the operative performance in the virtual reality group was significantly better than the box-trainer group.

Authors' conclusions

Virtual reality training appears to decrease the operating time and improve the operative performance of surgical trainees with limited laparoscopic experience when compared with no training or with box-trainer training. However, the impact of this decreased operating time and improvement in operative performance on patients and healthcare funders in terms of improved outcomes or decreased costs is not known. Further well-designed trials at low risk of bias and random errors are necessary. Such trials should assess the impact of virtual reality training on clinical outcomes.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Virtual reality training for supplementing standard training in surgical trainees with limited prior laparoscopic experience

Standard surgical training has traditionally been one of apprenticeship, where the surgical trainee learns to perform the surgery under the supervision of a trained surgeon. This is costly, time-consuming, and is of variable effectiveness. Laparoscopic surgery involves the use of instruments using keyhole and is generally considered more difficult than open surgery. Training using a virtual reality simulator (computer simulation) is an option to supplement standard laparoscopic surgical training. Virtual reality training improves the technical skills of surgical trainees. The impact of virtual reality training in supplementing standard laparoscopic surgical training in surgical trainees with limited prior laparoscopic experience on patients is not known. We define surgical trainees with limited prior laparoscopic experience as those who have helped senior surgeons in laparoscopic operations and would need supervision for performing laparoscopic operations on their own. We sought to answer the question of whether virtual reality training is useful for such surgical trainees in terms of improving surgical results and for improving the operative performance by performing a thorough search of the medical literature for randomised clinical trials. Randomised clinical trials are commonly called randomised controlled trials and are the best study design to answer such questions. If conducted well, they provide the most accurate answer.

Two authors searched the medical literature available until July 2012 and obtained the information from the identified trials. The use of two authors to identify studies and obtain information decreases the errors in obtaining the information. We identified and included eight trials covering 109 surgical trainees in this review. The trials compared virtual reality with no supplementary training or with box-trainer training (physical simulator using a camera to display the inside of the box and instruments). There were no trials that compared different forms of virtual reality training. All the trials were at high risk of bias (defects in study design that can lead to arriving at wrong conclusions with overestimation of benefits and underestimation of harms of virtual reality training or standard training). Operating time and operative performance were the only outcomes reported in the trials. The remaining outcomes such as death, complications, quality of life, and hospital stay after the operation were not reported in any of the trials. Overall virtual reality training appears to decrease the operating time (by about 10 minutes) and improve the operative performance of surgical trainees (difficult to quantify from the available reports) with limited laparoscopic experience when compared with no supplementary training or with box-trainer training. However, the impact of this decreased operating time and improvement in operative performance on patients or healthcare funders in terms of improved health or decreased costs is not known. Further well-designed trials are necessary, with less risk of arriving at wrong conclusions because of poor study design or because of chance. Such trials should assess the impact of virtual reality training on patients and healthcare funders.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Formation des stagiaires en chirurgie par réalité virtuelle à la laparochirurgie

Contexte

La formation standard en chirurgie a traditionnellement été l'un des moyens d'apprentissage, avec lequel le stagiaire en chirurgie apprend à pratiquer la chirurgie sous la supervision d'un chirurgien responsable. Cela coûte cher, nécessite du temps et aboutit à une efficacité variable. La formation utilisant un simulateur de réalité virtuelle est une option en complément de la formation standard. La formation par réalité virtuelle améliore les compétences techniques des stagiaires en chirurgie en réduisant la durée de la suture et en renforçant la précision. L'impact clinique de la formation par réalité virtuelle n'est pas connu.

Objectifs

Évaluer les bénéfices (compétence chirurgicale accrue et amélioration des critères de jugement chez les patients) et les risques (aggravation potentielle des critères de jugement chez les patients) de la formation par réalité virtuelle complémentaire des stagiaires en chirurgie ayant une expérience en laparochirurgie limitée.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) de The Cochrane Library, ainsi que dans MEDLINE, EMBASE et Science Citation Index Expanded jusqu'à juillet 2012.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus tous les essais cliniques randomisés comparant la formation par réalité virtuelle versus d'autres méthodes de formation incluant la formation par simulateurs vidéo, l'absence de formation, ou la formation standard en laparochirurgie des stagiaires en chirurgie ayant une expérience en laparochirurgie limitée. Nous avions aussi prévu d'inclure les essais comparant différentes méthodes de formation par réalité virtuelle. Nous n'avons inclus que les essais ayant évalué les critères de jugement chez les participants subissant une laparochirurgie.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont identifié les essais et extrait les données de manière indépendante. Nous avons analysé les données à la fois avec le modèle à effets fixes et le modèle à effets aléatoires en utilisant le logiciel Review Manager 5. Pour chaque résultat, nous avons calculé la différence moyenne (DM) ou la différence moyenne standardisée (DMS) avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 % sur la base de l'analyse en intention de traiter.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons inclus huit essais couvrant 109 stagiaires en chirurgie ayant une expérience en laparochirurgie limitée. Sur les huit essais, six ont comparé la formation par réalité virtuelle à l'absence de formation complémentaire. Un essai a comparé la formation par réalité virtuelle à une formation par un chirurgien avec simulateurs vidéo et à l'absence de formation complémentaire, et un essai a comparé la formation par réalité virtuelle à une formation par un chirurgien avec simulateurs vidéo. Nous n'avons identifié aucun essai ayant comparé différentes formes de formation par réalité virtuelle. Tous les essais étaient à risque élevé de biais. La durée de l'opération et la performance chirurgicale ont été les uniques critères de jugement rapportés dans les essais. Les autres critères de jugement tels que la mortalité, la morbidité, la qualité de vie (les principaux critères de jugement de cette revue) et le séjour hospitalier (critère de jugement secondaire) n'ont pas été rapportés.

Comparaison entre la formation par réalité virtuelle et l'absence de formation complémentaire : La durée de l'opération a été nettement plus courte dans le groupe de formation par réalité virtuelle que dans le groupe sans formation complémentaire (3 essais ; 49 participants ; DM -11,76 minutes ; IC à 95 % -15,23 à -8,30). Deux essais qui n'ont pas pu être inclus dans la méta-analyse ont aussi révélé une réduction de la durée de l'opération (statistiquement significative dans un essai). Les valeurs numériques pour la durée de l'opération n'ont pas été rapportées dans ces deux essais. La performance chirurgicale a été nettement meilleure dans le groupe de formation par réalité virtuelle que dans le groupe sans formation complémentaire en utilisant un modèle à effets fixes (2 essais ; 33 participants ; DMS 1,65 ; IC à 95 % 0,72 à 2,58). Les résultats sont devenus non significatifs quand le modèle à effets aléatoires a été utilisé (2 essais ; 33 participants ; DMS 2,14 ; IC à 95 % -1,29 à 5,57). Un essai n'a pas pu être inclus dans la méta-analyse car il n'avait pas rapporté les valeurs numériques. Les auteurs ont affirmé que la performance chirurgicale du groupe de formation par réalité virtuelle a été significativement meilleure que celle du groupe témoin.

Comparaison entre la formation par réalité virtuelle et la formation par simulateurs vidéo : L'unique essai qui a rendu compte de la durée de l'opération n'a pas rapporté les valeurs numériques. Dans cet essai, la durée de l'opération dans le groupe de formation par réalité virtuelle a été nettement plus courte que dans le groupe de formation par simulateurs vidéo. Sur les deux essais ayant rendu compte de la performance chirurgicale, un seul essai a rapporté les valeurs numériques. La performance chirurgicale a été nettement meilleure dans le groupe de formation par réalité virtuelle que dans le groupe de formation par simulateurs vidéo (1 essai ; 19 participants ; DMS 1,46 ; IC à 95 % 0,42 à 2,50). Dans l'autre essai qui n'a pas rapporté les valeurs numériques, les auteurs ont affirmé que la performance chirurgicale dans le groupe de formation par réalité virtuelle a été nettement meilleure que dans le groupe de formation par simulateurs vidéo.

Conclusions des auteurs

La formation par réalité virtuelle semble réduire la durée de l'opération et améliorer la performance chirurgicale des stagiaires en chirurgie ayant une expérience préalable en laparochirurgie limitée par rapport à l'absence de formation ou à la formation par simulateurs vidéo. Toutefois, l'impact de la diminution de la durée de l'opération et de l'amélioration de la performance chirurgicale chez les patients et les contribuables du système de santé en termes d'amélioration des résultats ou de baisse des coûts n'est pas connu. De nouveaux essais bien conçus à faible risque de biais et d'erreurs aléatoires sont nécessaires. De tels essais devront évaluer l'impact de la formation par réalité virtuelle sur les résultats cliniques.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Formation par réalité virtuelle en complément de la formation standard des stagiaires en chirurgie ayant une expérience préalable en laparochirurgie limitée

La formation standard en chirurgie a traditionnellement été l'un des moyens d'apprentissage, avec lequel le stagiaire en chirurgie apprend à pratiquer la chirurgie sous la supervision d'un chirurgien responsable. Cela coûte cher, nécessite du temps et aboutit à une efficacité variable. La laparochirurgie implique le recours à des instruments utilisant un orifice et l'on considère en général qu'elle est plus difficile que la chirurgie ouverte. La formation utilisant un simulateur de réalité virtuelle (simulation informatisée) est une option pour compléter la formation standard en chirurgie laparoscopique. La formation par réalité virtuelle améliore les compétences techniques des stagiaires en chirurgie. L'impact de la formation par réalité virtuelle en complément de la formation standard des stagiaires en laparochirurgie ayant une expérience préalable en laparochirurgie limitée sur les patients n'est pas connu. Selon notre définition, les stagiaires en chirurgie ayant une expérience préalable en laparochirurgie limitée sont les stagiaires qui ont assisté les principaux chirurgiens lors des interventions de laparochirurgie et qui pourraient nécessiter une supervision pour la pratique à titre individuel des laparochirurgies. Nous avons cherché à répondre à la question de savoir si la formation par réalité virtuelle est utile pour ces stagiaires en chirurgie en termes d'amélioration des résultats de l'intervention chirurgicale et d'amélioration des performances de la chirurgie en effectuant une recherche approfondie dans la littérature médicale pour trouver des essais cliniques randomisés. Les essais cliniques randomisés sont fréquemment appelés essais contrôlés randomisés et sont la meilleure conception d'étude pour répondre à de telles questions. S'ils sont bien menés, ils fournissent la réponse la plus précise.

Deux auteurs ont effectué des recherches dans la littérature médicale disponible jusqu'à juillet 2012 et ont obtenu des informations à partir des essais identifiés. L'utilisation de deux auteurs pour identifier les études et obtenir les informations réduit les erreurs lors du recueil des données. Nous avons identifié et inclus huit essais couvrant 109 stagiaires en chirurgie dans cette revue. Les essais ont comparé la formation par réalité virtuelle à l'absence de formation ou à la formation par simulateurs vidéo (simulation physique utilisant une caméra pour visualiser l'intérieur de l'organisme et des instruments). Nous n'avons identifié aucun essai ayant comparé différentes formes de formation par réalité virtuelle. Tous les essais présentaient un risque élevé de biais (défauts dans la conception de l'étude qui peuvent conduire à tirer de fausses conclusions avec une surestimation des bénéfices et une sous-estimation des risques de la formation par réalité virtuelle ou de la formation standard). La durée de l'opération et la performance chirurgicale ont été les uniques critères de jugement rapportés dans les essais. Les autres critères tels que la mortalité, les complications, la qualité de vie, et la durée de séjour hospitalier après l'opération n'ont été rapportés dans aucun des essais. Globalement, la formation par réalité virtuelle semble réduire la durée de l'opération (d'environ 10 minutes) et améliorer la performance chirurgicale des stagiaires en chirurgie (difficile à quantifier d'après les comptes-rendus disponibles) ayant une expérience préalable en laparochirurgie limitée par rapport à l'absence de formation ou à la formation par simulateurs vidéo. Toutefois, l'impact de la diminution de la durée de l'opération et de l'amélioration de la performance chirurgicale chez les patients ou les contribuables du système de santé en termes d'amélioration de la santé ou de baisse des coûts n'est pas connu. De nouveaux essais bien conçus sont nécessaires, avec un risque moindre de tirer de fausses conclusions en raison de la conception médiocre des études ou par l'effet du hasard. De tels essais devront évaluer l'impact de la formation par réalité virtuelle chez les patients et les contribuables du système de santé.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 16th October, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.