Intervention Review

Robot assistant versus human or another robot assistant in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

  1. Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy1,*,
  2. Kumarakrishnan Samraj2,
  3. Giuseppe Fusai1,
  4. Brian R Davidson1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group

Published Online: 12 SEP 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 25 JUL 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006578.pub3


How to Cite

Gurusamy KS, Samraj K, Fusai G, Davidson BR. Robot assistant versus human or another robot assistant in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 9. Art. No.: CD006578. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006578.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Department of Surgery, London, UK

  2. 2

    John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of General Surgery, Oxford, UK

*Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy, Department of Surgery, Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Royal Free Hospital,, Pond Street, London, NW3 2QG, UK. kurinchi2k@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 12 SEP 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

The role of a robotic assistant in laparoscopic cholecystectomy is controversial. While some trials have shown distinct advantages of a robotic assistant over a human assistant others have not, and it is unclear which robotic assistant is best.

Objectives

The aims of this review are to assess the benefits and harms of a robot assistant versus human assistant or versus another robot assistant in laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and to assess whether the robot can substitute the human assistant.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded (until February 2012) for identifying the randomised clinical trials.

Selection criteria

Only randomised clinical trials (irrespective of language, blinding, or publication status) comparing robot assistants versus human assistants in laparoscopic cholecystectomy were considered for the review. Randomised clinical trials comparing different types of robot assistants were also considered for the review.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently identified the trials for inclusion and independently extracted the data. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) using the fixed-effect and the random-effects models based on intention-to-treat analysis, when possible, using Review Manager 5.

Main results

We included six trials with 560 patients. One trial involving 129 patients did not state the number of patients randomised to the two groups. In the remaining five trials 431 patients were randomised, 212 to the robot assistant group and 219 to the human assistant group. All the trials were at high risk of bias. Mortality and morbidity were reported in only one trial with 40 patients. There was no mortality or morbidity in either group. Mortality and morbidity were not reported in the remaining trials. Quality of life or the proportion of patients who were discharged as day-patient laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients were not reported in any trial. There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients who required conversion to open cholecystectomy (2 trials; 4/63 (weighted proportion 6.4%) in the robot assistant group versus 5/70 (7.1%) in the human assistant group; RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.25 to 3.20). There was no significant difference in the operating time between the two groups (4 trials; 324 patients; MD 5.00 minutes; 95% CI -0.55 to 10.54). In one trial, about one sixth of the laparoscopic cholecystectomies in which a robot assistant was used required temporary use of a human assistant. In another trial, there was no requirement for human assistants. One trial did not report this information. It appears that there was little or no requirement for human assistants in the other three trials. There were no randomised trials comparing one type of robot versus another type of robot.

Authors' conclusions

Robot assisted laparoscopic cholecystectomy does not seem to offer any significant advantages over human assisted laparoscopic cholecystectomy. However, all trials had a high risk of systematic errors or bias (that is, risk of overestimation of benefit and underestimation of harm). All trials were small, with few or no outcomes. Hence, the risk of random errors (that is, play of chance) is high. Further randomised trials with low risk of bias or random errors are needed.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Robot assistant versus human or another robot assistant in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

Patients with symptomatic gallstones generally undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy (key-hole removal of the gallbladder). During this procedure there is only tunnel vision for the surgeon provided by a camera inserted through one of the key-holes. The surgeon operates using instruments while a nurse or another doctor shows the surgeon the operating field using the camera. Thus, the human assistant acts as the 'surgeons' eyes' during the laparoscopic procedure. Recently, robots have been used to assist the surgeons in performing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Various types of robots exist. Some just hold the camera and can be controlled by surgeons' voice commands or the surgeons' head movements. Adanced robotic systems can hold the camera and all the instruments, all of which are controlled by the surgeon using a console (like in a gaming device). The role of a robotic assistant in laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not known. We sought this information by undertaking a detailed literature search in a systematic way to obtain all the information available from randomised clinical trials. Such clinical trials, if designed well, provide the best estimate of the true effects of interventions.

A detailed and systematic review of the literature revealed that there were six randomised clinical trials including 560 patients. One trial involving 129 patients did not state the number of patients randomised to the two groups. Of the remaining 431 patients in the remaining five trials, 212 patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy with the help of robot assistant and 219 patients underwent the same procedure with the help of a human assistant. All the trials were at high risk of bias (that is, they were prone to systematic underestimation of harms or overestimation of the benefits of the robotic assistant group or the human assistant group because of the beliefs of the people conducting the trial) and errors due to play of chance. Mortality and surgical complications were reported in only one trial with 40 patients. There were no mortality or surgical complications in either group in this trial. Mortality and morbidity were not reported in the remaining trials. Quality of life or the proportion of patients who were discharged as day-patient laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients were not reported in any trial. There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients who underwent conversion to open cholecystectomy or in the operating time between the two groups. In one trial, about one sixth of the laparoscopic cholecystectomies in which a robot assistant was used required temporary use of a human assistant. In another trial, there was no requirement for human assistants. One trial did not report this information. It appears that there was little or no requirement for human assistants in the other three trials. Robot-assisted laparoscopic cholecystectomy does not seem to offer any significant advantages over human-assisted laparoscopic cholecystectomy. However, our present evidence base is limited by trials that all have high risk of systematic errors (potential to underestimate harms or overestimate benefits of the robot assistant group or the human assistant group) and random errors (that is, play of chance). Therefore, further well-designed randomised trials with low risk of systematic errors and low risk of random errors are needed.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Assistant robotisé versus assistant humain ou autre assistant robotisé en cholécystectomie laparoscopique

Contexte

Le rôle de l'assistant robotique dans la cholécystectomie laparoscopique est controversé. Alors que certains essais ont montré de nets avantages de l'assistant robotique sur l'assistant humain, ce n'était pas le cas dans d'autres ; il est également difficile de déterminer quel assistant robotique est le meilleur.

Objectifs

Les objectifs de cette étude sont d'évaluer les avantages et les inconvénients d'un robot assistant par rapport à un assistant humain ou par rapport à un autre robot assistant pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique, et d'évaluer si le robot peut se substituer à l'assistant humain.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) de The Cochrane Library, ainsi que dans MEDLINE, EMBASE et Science Citation Index Expanded (jusqu'à février 2012) pour identifier les essais cliniques randomisés.

Critères de sélection

N'ont été pris en considération pour la revue que les essais cliniques randomisés (indépendamment de la langue, du masquage et du statut de publication) ayant comparé des assistants robotisés à des assistants humains pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique. Les essais cliniques randomisés ayant comparé différents types de robots assistants ont également été pris en considération pour la revue.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont, de façon indépendante, identifié les essais à inclure et extrait les données. Nous avons calculé à l'aide du logiciel Review Manager 5, lorsque cela était possible, le risque relatif (RR) ou la différence moyenne (DM) avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 % sur la base d'une analyse en intention de traiter au moyen des modèles à effets fixes et à effets aléatoires.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus six essais totalisant 560 patients. Un essai portant sur 129 patients n'avait pas indiqué le nombre de patients randomisés dans les deux groupes. Dans les cinq autres essais, 431 patients avaient été randomisés : 212 dans le groupe à assistance robotisé et 219 dans le groupe à assistance humaine. Tous les essais étaient à risque élevé de biais. Un seul essai sur 40 patients avait rendu compte de la mortalité et de la morbidité. La mortalité et la morbidité étaient nulles dans les deux groupes. Les autres essais n'avaient pas rendu compte de la mortalité ou de la morbidité. Aucun essai n'avait rendu compte de la qualité de vie ou de la proportion de patients libérés dans le cadre d'une cholécystectomie laparoscopique ambulatoire. Il n'y avait pas de différence significative dans la proportion de patients ayant du passer en cholécystectomie ouverte (2 essais ; 4/63 (proportion pondérée 6,4 %) dans le groupe à assistance robotisée versus 5/70 (7,1 %) dans le groupe à assistance humaine ; RR 0,90 ; IC à 95 % 0,25 à 3,20). Il n'y avait pas de différence significative entre les deux groupes dans la durée de l'opération (4 essais, 324 patients ; DM 5,00 minutes ; IC à 95 % -0,55 à 10,54). Dans un essai, pour environ un sixième des cholécystectomies laparoscopiques dans lesquelles un robot assistant avait été utilisé, l'utilisation temporaire d'un assistant humain avait été nécessaire. Dans un autre essai, il n'y avait pas eu besoin d'assistant humain. Un essai n'avait pas rendu compte de cette information. Il semble qu'il n'y avait eu que peu ou pas besoin d'assistants humains dans les trois autres essais. Il n'y avait pas d'essais randomisés ayant comparé un type de robot à un autre type de robot.

Conclusions des auteurs

La cholécystectomie laparoscopique assistée par robot ne semble pas présenter d'avantages significatifs sur la cholécystectomie laparoscopique avec assistance humaine. Tous les essais présentaient toutefois un risque élevé d'erreurs ou de biais systématiques (c.-à-d. le risque de surestimer les effets bénéfiques et de sous-estimer les inconvénients). Tous les essais étaient de petite taille, avec peu ou pas de critères de jugement. Par conséquent, le risque d'erreurs aléatoires (c.-à-d. d'effet de hasard) est élevé. De nouvelles études randomisées à faible risque de biais et d'erreurs aléatoires sont nécessaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Assistant robotisé versus assistant humain ou autre assistant robotisé en cholécystectomie laparoscopique

Assistant robotisé versus assistant humain ou autre assistant robotisé en cholécystectomie laparoscopique

Les patients souffrant de calculs biliaires symptomatiques subissent généralement une cholécystectomie laparoscopique (ablation de la vésicule biliaire par de petits orifices dans la paroi abdominale). Au cours de cette procédure le chirurgien ne dispose que de la vue étroite fournie par une caméra insérée à travers un des orifices. Le chirurgien opère au moyen d'instruments pendant qu'une infirmière ou un autre médecin lui montre le champ opératoire à l'aide de la caméra. L'assistant humain agit ainsi comme les « yeux du chirurgien » au cours de la procédure laparoscopique. Récemment, des robots ont commencé à être utilisés pour aider les chirurgiens à réaliser une cholécystectomie laparoscopique. Il existe différents types de robots. Certains ne portent qu'une caméra et peuvent être contrôlés par la voie ou les mouvements de tête du chirurgien. Les systèmes robotisés avancés peuvent gérer la caméra et tous les instruments, tous étant contrôlés par le chirurgien au moyen d'une console (comme une console de jeu). On n'est pas sûr du rôle que pourrait jouer un assistant robotique dans la cholécystectomie laparoscopique. Nous avons recherché cette information en effectuant une recherche documentaire systématique et détaillée afin de récolter tous les renseignements fournis par des essais cliniques randomisés. De tels essais cliniques, s'ils sont bien conçus, fournissent la meilleure estimation des effets réels d'interventions.

Une revue détaillée et systématique de la littérature a révélé qu'il y avait six essais cliniques randomisés incluant au total 560 patients. Un essai portant sur 129 patients n'avait pas indiqué le nombre de patients randomisés dans les deux groupes. Des 431 patients restants dans les cinq autres essais, 212 patients avaient subi une cholécystectomie laparoscopique avec l'aide d'un assistant robotisé et 219 patients avaient subi la même procédure avec l'aide d'un assistant humain. Tous les essais étaient à risque élevé de biais (c'est à dire qu'ils étaient enclins à systématiquement sous-estimer les inconvénients ou surestimer les bénéfices dans le groupe à assistant robotique ou dans le groupe à assistant humain à cause des croyances de ceux qui effectuaient l'essai) et d'erreurs dues à l'effet de hasard. Un seul essai sur 40 patients avait rendu compte de la mortalité et des complications chirurgicales. Dans aucun des groupes de cet essai il n'y avait eu de décès ou de complications chirurgicales. Les autres essais n'avaient pas rendu compte de la mortalité ou de la morbidité. Aucun essai n'avait rendu compte de la qualité de vie ou de la proportion de patients libérés dans le cadre d'une cholécystectomie laparoscopique ambulatoire. Il n'y avait pas de différence significative entre les deux groupes dans la proportion de patients ayant passé en cholécystectomie ouverte ou dans la durée de l'opération. Dans un essai, pour environ un sixième des cholécystectomies laparoscopiques dans lesquelles un robot assistant avait été utilisé, l'utilisation temporaire d'un assistant humain avait été nécessaire. Dans un autre essai, il n'y avait pas eu besoin d'assistant humain. Un essai n'avait pas rendu compte de cette information. Il semble qu'il n'y avait eu que peu ou pas besoin d'assistants humains dans les trois autres essais. La cholécystectomie laparoscopique assistée par robot ne semble pas présenter d'avantages significatifs sur la cholécystectomie laparoscopique avec assistance humaine. Cependant, notre base de données actuelle est limitée par des essais ayant tous un risque élevé d'erreurs systématiques (risque de sous-estimer les inconvénients ou de surestimer les avantages du groupe à assistance robotisée ou du groupe à assistance humaine) et d'erreurs aléatoires (c.-à-d. d'effet de hasard). C'est pourquoi il est nécessaire de mener d'autres essais randomisés bien conçus, à faibles risques d'erreurs systématiques et d'erreurs aléatoires.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 30th October, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français