Intervention Review

Oral contraceptives containing drospirenone for premenstrual syndrome

  1. Laureen M Lopez1,*,
  2. Adrian A Kaptein2,
  3. Frans M Helmerhorst3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group

Published Online: 15 FEB 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 29 DEC 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006586.pub4

How to Cite

Lopez LM, Kaptein AA, Helmerhorst FM. Oral contraceptives containing drospirenone for premenstrual syndrome. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD006586. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006586.pub4.

Author Information

  1. 1

    FHI 360, Clinical Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA

  2. 2

    Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Medical Psychology, Leiden, Netherlands

  3. 3

    Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Gynaecology, Division of Reproductive Medicine and Dept. of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden, Netherlands

*Laureen M Lopez, Clinical Sciences, FHI 360, P.O. Box 13950, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27709, USA. llopez@fhi360.org.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 15 FEB 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a common problem. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome. Combined oral contraceptives, which provide both progestin and estrogen, have been examined for their ability to relieve premenstrual symptoms. An oral contraceptive containing drospirenone and a low estrogen dose has been approved for treating PMDD in women who choose oral contraceptives for contraception.

Objectives

To review all randomized controlled trials comparing a combined oral contraceptive containing drospirenone to a placebo or another combined oral contraceptive for effect on premenstrual symptoms.

Search methods

We searched for studies of drospirenone and premenstrual syndrome in the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, and POPLINE (20 Dec 2011); EMBASE, LILACS, PsycINFO, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) of the World Health Organization (02 Mar 2011). We also examined references lists of relevant articles and wrote to known investigators to find other trials.

Selection criteria

We included randomized controlled trials in any language that compared a combined oral contraceptive (COC) containing drospirenone with a placebo or with another COC for effect on premenstrual symptoms. The primary outcome included affective and physical premenstrual symptoms that were prospectively recorded. Adverse events related to combined oral contraceptive use were examined.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. For continuous variables, the mean difference (MD) was computed with 95% confidence interval (CI). For dichotomous outcomes, the Peto odds ratio (OR) with 95% CI was calculated.

Main results

We included five trials with a total of 1920 women. Two placebo-controlled trials of women with PMDD showed less severe premenstrual symptoms after three months with drospirenone 3 mg plus ethinyl estradiol 20 μg than with placebo (MD -7.92; 95% CI -11.16 to -4.67). The drospirenone group had greater mean decreases in impairment of productivity (MD -0.31; 95% CI -0.55 to -0.08), social activities (MD -0.29; 95% CI -0.54 to -0.04), and relationships (MD -0.30; 95% CI -0.54 to -0.06). Side effects more common with the use of the drospirenone COC contraceptive were nausea, intermenstrual bleeding, and breast pain. The respective odds ratios were 3.15 (95% CI 1.90 to 5.22), 4.92 (95% CI 3.03 to 7.96), and 2.67 (95% CI 1.50 to 4.78). Total adverse events related to the study drug were more likely for the drospirenone COC group (OR 2.36; 95% CI 1.62 to 3.44). Three trials studied the effect of drospirenone 3 mg plus ethinyl estradiol 30 μg on less severe symptoms. A placebo-controlled six-month trial had insufficient data for primary outcome analysis. Another six-month study used levonorgestrel 150 µg plus ethinyl estradiol 30 µg for the comparison group but did not provide enough data on premenstrual symptoms. In a two-year trial, the drospirenone COC group had similar premenstrual symptoms to the comparison group given desogestrel 150 µg plus ethinyl estradiol 30 µg (OR 0.87; 95% CI 0.63 to 1.22). The groups were also similar for adverse events related to treatment (OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.78 to 1.33).

Authors' conclusions

Drospirenone 3 mg plus ethinyl estradiol 20 μg may help treat premenstrual symptoms in women with severe symptoms, that is, premenstrual dysphoric disorder. The placebo also had a large effect. We do not know whether the combined oral contraceptive works after three cycles, helps women with less severe symptoms, or is better than other oral contraceptives. Larger and longer trials of higher quality are needed to address these issues. Trials should follow CONSORT guidelines.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Birth control pills with drospirenone for treating premenstrual syndrome

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a common problem. A severe form is called premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Birth control pills with the hormones progestin and estrogen have been studied for treating such symptoms. A birth control pill with the progestin drospirenone may work better than other such pills. A drospirenone pill with low estrogen was approved for treating PMDD, the severe form of PMS, in women who use birth control pills.

We did a computer search for trials that compared a birth control pill containing drospirenone and estrogen to a placebo ('dummy') or another birth control pill in treating premenstrual symptoms. We wrote to researchers to find other trials. We looked at whether the pills reduced symptoms and if side effects were reported. Women recorded their symptoms over time.

We found five trials with 1920 women. Two trials compared a dummy pill to a drospirenone pill with low estrogen. All the women had PMDD, the severe form of PMS, before the trial. After three months, women on the drospirenone pill with low estrogen had less severe premenstrual symptoms than the group taking the dummy pill. Women in the drospirenone group said they could do more and had more social activities and friends. Women on the drospirenone pill had more nausea, bleeding between periods, and breast pain. These side effects are common with birth control pills. Three trials studied a drospirenone pill with more estrogen for treating less severe symptoms. These women did not all have PMDD. One compared the drospirenone pill to a dummy pill but did not have enough data for our review. Two compared the study pill to another birth control pill. The two-year study showed the groups were similar for premenstrual symptoms and side effects. The six-month study did not give enough data on the symptoms.

A drospirenone pill with low estrogen seems to help premenstrual symptoms in women with severe symptoms (PMDD). The drospirenone pill worked a little better than the dummy pill, which also affected symptoms. We do not know if the birth control pill works longer than three cycles, helps women with less severe symptoms, or is better than other birth control pills. Longer and better studies with more women are needed to address these issues. Trials reports should be clearer about how the study was done.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Contraceptifs oraux contenant de la drospirénone pour le traitement du syndrome prémenstruel

Contexte

Le syndrome prémenstruel (SPM) est un trouble très répandu. Les troubles dysphoriques prémenstruels (TDPM) correspondent à une forme grave du syndrome prémenstruel. Des contraceptifs oraux combinés, composés de progestérone et d'œstrogène, ont été étudiés pour leur capacité à atténuer les symptômes prémenstruels. Un contraceptif oral contenant de la drospirénone et une faible dose d'œstrogène a été approuvé pour le traitement des TDPM chez les femmes choisissant les contraceptifs oraux comme méthode contraceptive.

Objectifs

Examiner tous les essais contrôlés randomisés qui comparaient un contraceptif oral combiné contenant de la drospirénone à un placebo ou un autre contraceptif oral combiné en termes d'effets sur les symptômes prémenstruels.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons recherché des études concernant la drospirénone et le syndrome prémenstruel dans les bases de données suivantes : Le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE et POPLINE (20 décembre 2011) ; EMBASE, LILACS, PsycINFO, ClinicalTrials.gov et le système d'enregistrement international des essais cliniques de l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé (ICTRP pour International Clinical Trials Registry Platform) (2 mars 2011). Nous avons aussi examiné les listes bibliographiques des articles pertinents et contacté des chercheurs connus afin de trouver d'autres essais.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés en n'importe quelle langue qui comparaient un contraceptif oral combiné (COC) contenant de la drospirénone à un placebo ou à un autre COC en termes d'effets sur les symptômes prémenstruels. Le principal critère de jugement incluait les symptômes affectifs et physiques prémenstruels qui étaient enregistrés de manière prospective. Les événements indésirables liés à la prise d'un contraceptif oral combiné étaient examinés.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment extrait les données et évalué la qualité méthodologique des études. Pour les variables continues, la différence moyenne (DM) était calculée avec un intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 %. Pour les résultats dichotomiques, le rapport des cotes (RC) de Peto était calculé avec un IC à 95 %.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus cinq essais totalisant 1 920 femmes. Deux essais contrôlés par placebo réalisés auprès de femmes atteintes de TDPM montraient des symptômes prémenstruels moins graves au bout de trois mois avec 3 mg de drospirénone et 20 µg d'éthinylestradiol par rapport à un placebo (DM - 7,92 ; IC à 95 % - 11,16 à - 4,67). Le groupe sous drospirénone affichait des baisses moyennes plus importantes au niveau de la dégradation de la productivité (DM - 0,31 ; IC à 95 % - 0,55 à - 0,08), des activités sociales (DM - 0,29 ; IC à 95 % - 0,54 à - 0,04) et du relationnel (DM - 0,30 ; IC à 95 % - 0,54 à - 0,06). Des effets secondaires plus courants liés à la prise d'un contraceptif COC à base de drospirénone incluaient des nausées, des hémorragies intermenstruelles et des douleurs mammaires. Les rapports des cotes respectifs étaient de 3,15 (IC à 95 % 1,90 à 5,22), 4,92 (IC à 95 % 3,03 à 7,96) et 2,67 (IC à 95 % 1,50 à 4,78). Le nombre total d'événements indésirables liés au médicament de l'étude avait plus de chances de concerner le groupe prenant un COC à base de drospirénone (RC 2,36 ; IC à 95 % 1,62 à 3,44). Trois essais étudiaient les effets de 3 mg de drospirénone et de 30 µg d'éthinylestradiol sur des symptômes moins graves. Un essai de six mois contrôlé par placebo ne contenait pas suffisamment de données pour réaliser une analyse du principal critère de jugement. Une autre étude de six mois utilisait 150 µg de lévonorgestrel et 30 µg d'éthinylestradiol pour le groupe de comparaison, mais ne fournissait pas suffisamment de données sur les symptômes prémenstruels. Dans un essai d'une durée de deux ans, le groupe prenant un COC à base de drospirénone présentait des symptômes prémenstruels similaires à ceux du groupe de comparaison auquel 150 µg de désogestrel et 30 µg d'éthinylestradiol étaient administrés (RC 0,87 ; IC à 95 % 0,63 à 1,22). Ces groupes présentaient aussi des réponses similaires aux événements indésirables liés au traitement (RC 1,02 ; IC à 95 % 0,78 à 1,33).

Conclusions des auteurs

Trois mg de drospirénone et 20 µg d'éthinylestradiol peuvent permettre de traiter les symptômes prémenstruels chez les femmes souffrant de symptômes graves, à savoir des troubles dysphoriques prémenstruels. Les effets du placebo étaient également significatifs. Nous ignorons si un contraceptif oral combiné est efficace après trois cycles, s'il atténue les symptômes moins graves chez les femmes ou s'il est plus efficace que les autres contraceptifs oraux. Pour répondre à ces questions, d'autres essais plus approfondis devront être réalisés à plus grande échelle et sur une durée plus longue. Les essais devront se conformer aux recommandations CONSORT.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Contraceptifs oraux contenant de la drospirénone pour le traitement du syndrome prémenstruel

Pilules contraceptives à base de drospirénone pour le traitement du syndrome prémenstruel

Le syndrome prémenstruel (SPM) est un trouble très répandu. La forme la plus grave de ce syndrome porte le nom de « trouble dysphorique prémenstruel » (TDPM). Les pilules contraceptives composées de progestérone et d'œstrogène ont été étudiées pour le traitement de ces symptômes. Une pilule contraceptive à base de drospirénone (progestatif) peut être plus efficace que les autres pilules. Une pilule à base de drospirénone à faible teneur en œstrogène a été approuvée pour le traitement des TDPM, la forme la plus grave du SPM, chez les femmes suivant un traitement contraceptif.

Nous avons effectué des recherches électroniques d'essais qui comparaient une pilule contraceptive contenant de la drospirénone et de l'œstrogène à un placebo (pilule factice) ou à une autre pilule contraceptive pour le traitement des symptômes prémenstruels. Nous avons contacté des chercheurs afin de trouver d'autres essais. Nous avons observé les effets des pilules sur la diminution de ces symptômes et la présence d'éventuels effets secondaires. Les femmes consignaient leurs symptômes au fil du temps.

Nous avons trouvé cinq essais regroupant 1 920 femmes. Deux essais comparaient une pilule factice à une pilule à base de drospirénone à faible teneur en œstrogène. Toutes les femmes présentaient des TDPM, la forme la plus grave du SPM, avant de participer à l'essai. Au bout de trois mois, les femmes prenant une pilule à base de drospirénone à faible teneur en œstrogène présentaient des symptômes prémenstruels moins graves par rapport au groupe prenant une pilule factice. Les femmes du groupe prenant une pilule à base de drospirénone signalaient qu'elles étaient plus actives et qu'elles avaient une vie sociale plus épanouie et davantage d'amis. Ces femmes souffraient plus fréquemment de nausées, d'hémorragies entre les règles et de douleurs mammaires. Ces effets secondaires sont courants avec la prise de pilules contraceptives. Trois essais étudiaient une pilule à base de drospirénone avec une teneur supérieure en œstrogène pour le traitement des symptômes moins graves. Ces femmes ne souffraient pas toutes de TDPM. Un essai comparait la pilule à base de drospirénone à une pilule factice, mais contenait des données insuffisantes pour notre revue. Deux essais comparaient la pilule de l'étude à une autre pilule contraceptive. L'étude réalisée sur deux ans montrait que les groupes étaient semblables en termes de symptômes prémenstruels et d'effets secondaires. L'étude réalisée sur six mois ne fournissait pas suffisamment de données sur les symptômes.

Une pilule à base de drospirénone à faible teneur en œstrogène semble atténuer les symptômes prémenstruels chez les femmes présentant les symptômes les plus graves (TDPM). Cette pilule était un peu plus efficace que la pilule factice qui agissait également sur les symptômes. Nous ignorons si la pilule contraceptive est efficace au-delà de trois cycles, si elle permet d'atténuer les symptômes les moins graves chez les femmes ou si elle est plus efficace que les autres pilules contraceptives. Des études plus longues et plus approfondies avec davantage de femmes devront être réalisées pour répondre à ces questions. Les rapports d'essais doivent êtres plus explicites quant au déroulement de l'étude.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 18th May, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français