Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Quetiapine versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

  1. Laila Asmal1,*,
  2. Srnka J Flegar1,
  3. Jikun Wang2,
  4. Christine Rummel-Kluge3,
  5. Katja Komossa4,
  6. Stefan Leucht5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Schizophrenia Group

Published Online: 18 NOV 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 7 MAY 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006625.pub3


How to Cite

Asmal L, Flegar SJ, Wang J, Rummel-Kluge C, Komossa K, Leucht S. Quetiapine versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD006625. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006625.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Stellenbosch, Department of Psychiatry, Tygerberg, South Africa

  2. 2

    East China Normal University, School of Psychology and Cognitive Science, Shanghai, China

  3. 3

    University of Leipzig, Clinic and Outpatient Clinic of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Leipzig, Saxony, Germany

  4. 4

    University Hospital of Zurich, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Zurich, Switzerland

  5. 5

    Technische Universität München Klinikum rechts der Isar, Klinik und Poliklinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, München, Germany

*Laila Asmal, Department of Psychiatry, University of Stellenbosch, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, PO Box 19063, Tygerberg, 7505, South Africa. laila@sun.ac.za.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 18 NOV 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

In many countries, second-generation ('atypical') antipsychotic drugs have become the first-line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. It is not clear how the effects of the various second-generation antipsychotic drugs differ.

Objectives

To evaluate the effects of quetiapine compared with other second-generation (atypical) antipsychotic drugs in the treatment of people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (May 2010), inspected references of all identified studies, and contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies, drug approval agencies and authors of trials for additional information.

Selection criteria

We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing oral quetiapine with other oral forms of atypical antipsychotic medication in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses.

Data collection and analysis

We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data, we calculated risk ratios (RRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. We calculated number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MDs), again based on a random-effects model.

Main results

Efficacy data tended to favour the control drugs over quetiapine (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score vs olanzapine: 11 RCTs, n = 1486, mean quetiapine endpoint score 3.67 higher, CI 1.95 to 5.39, low quality; vs risperidone: 13 RCTs, n = 2155, mean quetiapine endpoint score 1.74 higher, CI 0.19 to 3.29, moderate quality; vs paliperidone: 1 RCT, n = 319, mean quetiapine endpoint score 6.30 higher, CI 2.77 to 9.83, moderate quality), but the clinical meaning of these data is unclear. No clear mental state differences were noted when quetiapine was compared with clozapine, aripiprazole or ziprasidone. Compared with olanzapine, quetiapine produced slightly fewer movement disorders (7 RCTs, n = 1127, RR use of antiparkinson medication 0.51, CI 0.32 to 0.81, moderate quality) and less weight gain (8 RCTs, n = 1667, RR 0.68, CI 0.51 to 0.92, moderate quality) and glucose elevation, but increased QTc prolongation (3 RCTs, n = 643, MD 4.81, CI 0.34 to 9.28). Compared with risperidone, quetiapine induced slightly fewer movement disorders (8 RCTs, n = 2163, RR use of antiparkinson medication 0.5, CI 0.36 to 0.69, moderate quality), less prolactin increase (7 RCTs, n = 1733, MD -35.25, CI -43.59 to -26.91) and some related adverse effects but greater cholesterol increase (6 RCTs, n = 1473, MD 8.57, CI 4.85 to 12.29). On the basis of limited data, compared with paliperidone, quetiapine induced fewer parkinsonian side effects (1 RCT, n = 319, RR use of antiparkinson medication 0.64, CI 0.45 to 0.91, moderate quality) and less prolactin increase (1 RCT, n = 319, MD -49.30, CI -57.80 to -40.80) and weight gain (1 RCT, n = 319, RR weight gain of 7% or more of total body weight 2.52, CI 0.5 to 12.78, moderate quality). Compared with ziprasidone, quetiapine induced slightly fewer extrapyramidal adverse effects (1 RCT, n = 522, RR use of antiparkinson medication 0.43, CI 0.2 to 0.93, moderate quality) and less prolactin increase. On the other hand, quetiapine was more sedating and led to greater weight gain (2 RCTs, n = 754, RR 2.22, CI 1.35 to 3.63, moderate quality) and cholesterol increase when compared with ziprasidone.

Authors' conclusions

Available evidence from trials suggests that most people who start quetiapine stop taking it within a few weeks (around 60%). Comparisons with amisulpride, sertindole and zotepine do not exist. Although efficacy data favour olanzapine and risperidone compared with quetiapine, the clinical meaning of these data remains unclear. Quetiapine may produce fewer parkinsonian effects than paliperidone, aripiprazole, ziprasidone, risperidone and olanzapine. Quetiapine appears to have a similar weight gain profile to risperidone, as well as clozapine and aripiprazole (although data are very limited for the latter two comparators). Quetiapine may produce greater weight gain than ziprasidone and less weight gain than olanzapine and paliperidone. Most data that have been reported within existing comparisons are of very limited value because of assumptions and biases within them. Much scope is available for further research into the effects of this widely used drug.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Quetiapine versus other atypical antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia

Quetiapine is a second-generation antipsychotic. Second-generation or atypical antipsychotic drugs have become the mainstay of treatment in many countries for people with schizophrenia. They are called second-generation drugs because they are newer than the older drugs, known as typical antipsychotics. Second-generation drugs are thought to be better than the older drugs in reducing the symptoms of schizophrenia, such as hearing voices and seeing things, and are suggested to produce fewer side effects, such as sleepiness, weight gain, tremors and shaking. However, it is not clear how the various second- generation antipsychotic drugs differ from one other. The aim of this review therefore was to evaluate the effects of quetiapine compared with other second-generation antipsychotic drugs for people with schizophrenia. The review included a total of 35 studies with 5971 people, which provided information on six comparisons (quetiapine vs the following: clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, paliperidone and aripiprazole). Comparisons with amisulpride, sertindole and zotepine do not exist, so more research is needed. A major limitation of all findings was the large number of people leaving studies and stopping quetiapine treatment (50.2% of people). The most important finding to note is that if a group is started on quetiapine, most will be off this drug within a few weeks (although the reasons for stopping quetiapine treatment are not covered by the review and so remain uncertain). Quetiapine may be slightly less effective than risperidone and olanzapine in reducing symptoms, and it may cause less weight gain and fewer side effects and associated problems (such as heart problems and diabetes) than olanzapine and paliperidone, but more than are seen with risperidone and ziprasidone. The limited information tends to suggest that people taking quetiapine may need to be hospitalised more frequently than those taking risperidone or olanzapine. This may lead to higher costs in some settings, but the information is not robust enough to guide managers.

This summary has been written by a consumer, Ben Gray (Benjamin Gray, Service User and Service User Expert, Rethink Mental Illness).

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Quétiapine versus autres antipsychotiques atypiques dans la schizophrénie

Contexte

Dans de nombreux pays, les médicaments antipsychotiques de deuxième génération ("atypiques") sont devenus le traitement médicamenteux de première intention pour les personnes atteintes de schizophrénie. On ignore quelles sont les différences entre les différents antipsychotiques de deuxième génération.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets de la quétiapine par rapport à d'autres médicaments antipsychotiques de deuxième génération (atypiques) dans le traitement des personnes atteintes de schizophrénie et de psychoses schizophréniformes.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur la schizophrénie (mai 2010), a été examiné, les références bibliographiques de toutes les études identifiées ont été inspectées, et les compagnies pharmaceutiques concernées et les agences d'approbation des médicaments ont été contactées ainsi que les auteurs des essais afin d'obtenir davantage d'informations.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus tous les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) comparant la quétiapine orale à d'autres formes orales d'antipsychotiques atypiques chez les personnes atteintes de schizophrénie ou de psychoses schizophréniformes.

Recueil et analyse des données

Les données ont été extraites de façon indépendante. Pour les données dichotomiques, nous avons calculé les rapports de risque (RR) et leur intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% en intention de traiter sur la base d'un modèle à effets aléatoires. Nous avons calculé le nombre de sujets à traiter pour obtenir un résultat bénéfique supplémentaire (NST) lorsque cela était approprié. Pour les données continues, nous avons calculé les différences moyennes (DM,), également sur la base d'un modèle à effets aléatoires.

Résultats Principaux

Les données d'efficacité tendaient à favoriser les médicaments contrôles par rapport à la quétiapine (Échelle des symptômes positifs et négatifs (ESPN)) au score total versus olanzapine: 11 ECR, n =1486, le score moyen du critère de résultat de la quétiapine est plus élevé de 3,67 points, IC entre 1,95 et 5,39, faible qualité ; versus rispéridone: 13 ECR, n =2155, le score moyen du critère de résultat de la quétiapine est plus élevé de 1,74 points, IC à 95% 0,19 à 3,29, qualité modérée ; vs la palipéridone: 1 ECR, n =319, le score moyen du critère de résultat de la quétiapine est plus élevé de 6,30 points, IC entre 2,77 et 9,83, qualité modérée ), mais la signification clinique de ces données n'est pas claire. Aucune différence claire concernant l'état mental n'a été observée lorsque la quétiapine était comparée à la clozapine, l'aripiprazole ou la ziprasidone. Par rapport à l'olanzapine, la quétiapine produisait légèrement moins de troubles des mouvements (7 ECR, n =1127, RR de l'utilisation de médicaments antiparkinsoniens de 0,51, IC entre 0,32 et 0,81, qualité modérée ) et moins de prise de poids (8 ECR, n =1667, RR de 0,68, IC entre 0,51 et 0,92, qualité modérée ) et moins d'augmentation de la glycémie, mais plus d'allongement de l'intervalle QTc (3 ECR, n =643, DM 4,81, IC entre 0,34 et 9,28). Par rapport à la rispéridone, la quétiapine induisait légèrement moins de troubles des mouvements (8 ECR, n =2163, RR de l'utilisation de médicaments antiparkinsoniens de 0,5, IC entre 0,36 et 0,69, qualité modérée ), moins d'augmentation de la prolactine (7 ECR, n =1733, DM -35,25, IC entre -43,59 et -26,91) et de certains des effets indésirables liés mais une augmentation du taux de cholestérolplus importante (6 ECR, n =1473, DM 8,57, IC entre 4,85 et 12,29). Sur la base de données limitées, par rapport à la palipéridone, la quétiapine était associée à moins d'effets secondaires parkinsoniens (1 ECR, n =319, RR de l'utilisation de médicaments antiparkinsoniens de 0,64, IC à 95% 0,45 à 0,91, qualité modérée ) et moins d'augmentation de la prolactine (1 ECR, n =319, DM -49,30, IC entre -57,80 et -40,80) et moins de prise de poids (1 ECR, n =319, RR de la prise de poids de 7% ou plus du poids corporel total 2,52, IC entre 0,5 et 12,78, qualité modérée ). Par rapport à la ziprasidone, la quétiapine induisait légèrement moins d'effets indésirables extrapyramidaux (1 ECR, n =522, RR de l'utilisation de médicaments antiparkinsoniens de 0,43, IC entre 0,2 et 0,93, qualité modérée ) et moins d'augmentation de la prolactine. D'autre part, la quétiapine était plus sédative et induisait une prise de poids plus importante (2 ECR, n =754, RR 2,22, IC entre 1,35 et 3,63, qualité modérée ) et une augmentation plus importante du taux de cholestérol par rapport à la ziprasidone.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les preuves disponibles issues d'essais suggèrent que la plupart des patients qui commencent la quétiapine l'arrêtent au bout de quelques semaines (environ 60%). Il n'existe pas de comparaisons avec l'amisulpride, le sertindole ou la zotépine. Bien que les données d'efficacité soient en faveur de l'olanzapine et de la rispéridone par rapport à la quétiapine, la signification clinique de ces données n'est pas clairement établie. La quétiapine pourrait entraîner moins d'effets parkinsoniens que la palipéridone, l'aripiprazole, la ziprasidone, la rispéridone et l'olanzapine. La quétiapine semble avoir un profil vis-à-vis de la prise de poids similaire à la rispéridone, ainsi qu'à la clozapine et à l'aripiprazole (bien que les données pour les deux derniers comparateurs soient très limitées). La quétiapine pourrait induire une prise de poids plus importante que la ziprasidone et moins importante que l'olanzapine et la palipéridone. La plupart des données rapportées dans les comparaisons existantes présentent une valeur très limitée en raison de suppositions douteuses et de biais. Beaucoup de recherches restent à faire concernant les effets de ce médicament largement utilisé.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Quétiapine versus autres antipsychotiques atypiques dans la schizophrénie

Quétiapine versus autres antipsychotiques atypiques dans la schizophrénie

La quétiapine est un antipsychotique de deuxième génération. Les médicaments antipsychotiques de deuxième génération dits atypiques sont devenus le pilier du traitement dans de nombreux pays pour les personnes atteintes de schizophrénie. Ils sont appelés médicaments de deuxième génération car ils sont plus récents, que les médicaments plus anciens, appelés antipsychotiques typiques Les médicaments antipsychotiques de deuxième génération sont supposés. être plus efficaces que les médicaments plus anciens pour réduire les symptômes de la schizophrénie, tels que le fait d'entendre des voix et de voir des choses, et on suppose qu'ils produisent moins d'effets secondaires, tels que somnolence, prise de poids, tremblements et mouvements anormaux. Cependant, il n'est pas clair en quoi les différents médicaments antipsychotiques de deuxième génération diffèrent les uns des autres. L'objectif de cette revue était donc d'évaluer les effets de la quétiapine par rapport à d'autres antipsychotiques de deuxième génération pour les personnes atteintes de schizophrénie. La revue a inclus un total de 35 études totalisant 5971 personnes, qui ont fourni des informations sur six comparaisons (la quétiapine versus les suivants: clozapine, olanzapine, rispéridone, la ziprasidone, la palipéridone et aripiprazole). Les comparaisons avec l'amisulpride, le sertindole et la zotépine ne sont pas disponibles, d'autres recherches sont donc nécessaires. Une limitation importante de tous les résultats était le grand nombre de personnes abandonnant les études et arrêtant la quétiapine (50,2% des personnes). Le résultat le plus important à noter est que si un groupe débute avec la quétiapine, la plupart des participants aura arrêter ce médicament en quelques semaines (bien que les raisons de l'arrêt de la quétiapine ne sont pas traitées par la revue et donc restent indéterminées). La quétiapine pourrait être légèrement moins efficace que la rispéridone et l'olanzapine dans la réduction des symptômes, et elle pourrait entraîner moins de prise de poids et moins d'effets secondaires et de problèmes associés (tels les problèmes cardiaques et le diabète) que l'olanzapine et la palipéridone, mais plus que ceux observés avec la rispéridone et la ziprasidone. Les informations limitées tendent à suggérer que les personnes prenant de la quétiapine ont besoin d'être hospitalisées plus fréquemment que celles sous rispéridone ou olanzapine. Cela peut conduire à des coûts plus élevés dans certains contextes, mais les informations ne sont pas assez solides pour guider les responsables.

Ce résumé a été rédigé par un usager, Ben Gray (Benjamin Gray, bénéficiaire du service et expert auprès des bénéficiaires du service, Rethink Mental Illness).

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux