Dietary advice interventions in pregnancy for preventing gestational diabetes mellitus

  • Conclusions changed
  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors

  • Joanna Tieu,

    Corresponding author
    1. The University of Adelaide, ARCH: Australian Research Centre for Health of Women and Babies, Robinson Research Institute, Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
    • Joanna Tieu, ARCH: Australian Research Centre for Health of Women and Babies, Robinson Research Institute, Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Adelaide, Women's and Children's Hospital, 1st floor, Queen Victoria Building, 72 King William Road, Adelaide, South Australia, 5006, Australia. joanna.tieu@gmail.com. joanna.tieu@mh.org.au.

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Emily Shepherd,

    1. The University of Adelaide, ARCH: Australian Research Centre for Health of Women and Babies, Robinson Research Institute, Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Philippa Middleton,

    1. Healthy Mothers, Babies and Children, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Caroline A Crowther

    1. The University of Auckland, Liggins Institute, Auckland, New Zealand
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Background

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a form of diabetes occurring during pregnancy which can result in short- and long-term adverse outcomes for women and babies. With an increasing prevalence worldwide, there is a need to assess strategies, including dietary advice interventions, that might prevent GDM.

Objectives

To assess the effects of dietary advice interventions for preventing GDM and associated adverse health outcomes for women and their babies.

Search methods

We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register (3 January 2016) and reference lists of retrieved studies.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs assessing the effects of dietary advice interventions compared with no intervention (standard care), or to different dietary advice interventions. Cluster-RCTs were eligible for inclusion but none were identified.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. Data were checked for accuracy. The quality of the evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach.

Main results

We included 11 trials involving 2786 women and their babies, with an overall unclear to moderate risk of bias. Six trials compared dietary advice interventions with standard care; four compared low glycaemic index (GI) with moderate- to high-GI dietary advice; one compared specific (high-fibre focused) with standard dietary advice.

Dietary advice interventions versus standard care (six trials)

Considering primary outcomes, a trend towards a reduction in GDM was observed for women receiving dietary advice compared with standard care (average risk ratio (RR) 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.35 to 1.04; five trials, 1279 women; Tau² = 0.20; I² = 56%; P = 0.07; GRADE: very low-quality evidence); subgroup analysis suggested a greater treatment effect for overweight and obese women receiving dietary advice. While no clear difference was observed for pre-eclampsia (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.25 to 1.46; two trials, 282 women; GRADE: low-quality evidence) a reduction in pregnancy-induced hypertension was observed for women receiving dietary advice (RR 0.30, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.88; two trials, 282 women; GRADE: low-quality evidence). One trial reported on perinatal mortality, and no deaths were observed (GRADE: very low-quality evidence). None of the trials reported on large-for-gestational age or neonatal mortality and morbidity.

For secondary outcomes, no clear differences were seen for caesarean section (average RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.24; four trials, 1194 women; Tau² = 0.02; I² = 36%; GRADE: low-quality evidence) or perineal trauma (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.23 to 3.08; one trial, 759 women; GRADE: very low-quality evidence). Women who received dietary advice gained less weight during pregnancy (mean difference (MD) -4.70 kg, 95% CI -8.07 to -1.34; five trials, 1336 women; Tau² = 13.64; I² = 96%; GRADE: low-quality evidence); the result should be interpreted with some caution due to considerable heterogeneity. No clear differences were seen for the majority of secondary outcomes reported, including childhood/adulthood adiposity (skin-fold thickness at six months) (MD -0.10 mm, 95% CI -0.71 to 0.51; one trial, 132 children; GRADE: low-quality evidence). Women receiving dietary advice had a lower well-being score between 14 and 28 weeks, more weight loss at three months, and were less likely to have glucose intolerance (one trial).

The trials did not report on other secondary outcomes, particularly those related to long-term health and health service use and costs. We were not able to assess the following outcomes using GRADE: postnatal depression; maternal type 2 diabetes; neonatal hypoglycaemia; childhood/adulthood type 2 diabetes; and neurosensory disability.

Low-GI dietary advice versus moderate- to high-GI dietary advice (four trials)

Considering primary outcomes, no clear differences were shown in the risks of GDM (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.31; four trials, 912 women; GRADE: low-quality evidence) or large-for-gestational age (average RR 0.60, 95% CI 0.19 to 1.86; three trials, 777 babies; Tau² = 0.61; P = 0.07; I² = 62%; GRADE: very low-quality evidence) between the low-GI and moderate- to high-GI dietary advice groups. The trials did not report on: hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; perinatal mortality; neonatal mortality and morbidity.

No clear differences were shown for caesarean birth (RR 1.27, 95% CI 0.79 to 2.04; two trials, 201 women; GRADE: very low-quality evidence) and gestational weight gain (MD -1.23 kg, 95% CI -4.08 to 1.61; four trials, 787 women; Tau² = 7.31; I² = 90%; GRADE: very low-quality evidence), or for other reported secondary outcomes.

The trials did not report the majority of secondary outcomes including those related to long-term health and health service use and costs. We were not able to assess the following outcomes using GRADE: perineal trauma; postnatal depression; maternal type 2 diabetes; neonatal hypoglycaemia; childhood/adulthood adiposity; type 2 diabetes; and neurosensory disability.

High-fibre dietary advice versus standard dietary advice (one trial)

The one trial in this comparison reported on two secondary outcomes. No clear difference between the high-fibre and standard dietary advice groups observed for mean blood glucose (following an oral glucose tolerance test at 35 weeks), and birthweight.

Authors' conclusions

Very low-quality evidence from five trials suggests a possible reduction in GDM risk for women receiving dietary advice versus standard care, and low-quality evidence from four trials suggests no clear difference for women receiving low- versus moderate- to high-GI dietary advice. A possible reduction in pregnancy-induced hypertension for women receiving dietary advice was observed and no clear differences were seen for other reported primary outcomes. There were few outcome data for secondary outcomes.

For outcomes assessed using GRADE, evidence was considered to be low to very low quality, with downgrading based on study limitations (risk of bias), imprecision, and inconsistency.

More high-quality evidence is needed to determine the effects of dietary advice interventions in pregnancy. Future trials should be designed to monitor adherence, women's views and preferences, and powered to evaluate effects on short- and long-term outcomes; there is a need for such trials to collect and report on core outcomes for GDM research. We have identified five ongoing studies and four are awaiting classification. We will consider these in the next review update.

Résumé scientifique

Les conseils diététiques pendant la grossesse pour la prévention du diabète sucré gestationnel

Contexte

Le diabète sucré gestationnel (DSG) est une forme de diabète survenant au cours de la grossesse qui peut entraîner des résultats indésirables à court et à long terme pour les femmes et les bébés. Du fait de sa prévalence croissante dans le monde entier, il est nécessaire d'évaluer des stratégies, notamment les interventions de conseil diététique qui pourraient prévenir le DSG.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des interventions de conseil diététique pour la prévention du DSG ainsi que leurs effets indésirables sur la santé pour les femmes et leurs bébés.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur la grossesse et l'accouchement (3 janvier 2016) et les références bibliographiques des études trouvées.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) et quasi-ECR évaluant les effets des interventions de conseil diététique par rapport à l'absence d'intervention (soins habituels), ou à différentes interventions de conseil diététique. Les ECR en grappes étaient éligibles pour l'inclusion, mais aucun n'a été identifié.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué l'éligibilité des études, extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais des études incluses. L'exactitude des données a été vérifiée. La qualité des preuves a été évaluée au moyen de l'approche GRADE.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons inclus 11 essais portant sur 2786 femmes ainsi que leurs bébés et le risque de biais global des essais était incertain à modéré. Six essais comparaient les interventions de conseil diététique à des soins standard ; quatre comparaient des conseils diététiques axés sur une alimentation à base d'aliments à faible IG à des conseils pour une alimentation à base d'aliments à IG modéré à élevé ; le dernier essai comparait des conseils spécifiques (alimentation riche en fibres) à des conseils diététiques standard.

Les interventions de conseil diététique par rapport aux soins standard (six essais)

Compte tenu des résultats primaires, une tendance à la réduction du DSG a été observée chez les femmes recevant des conseils diététiques par rapport à des soins standard (risque relatif moyen (RR) 0,60, intervalle de confiance à 95 % (IC) 0,35 à 1,04 ; cinq essais, 1279 femmes ; Tau² = 0,20 ; I² = 56 % ; P = 0,07 ; GRADE : preuves de très faible qualité) ; l'analyse en sous-groupes a suggéré un plus grand effet de l'intervention pour les femmes obèses et en surpoids recevant des conseils diététiques. Tandis qu'aucune différence claire n'a été observée pour la pré-éclampsie (RR 0,61, IC à 95 % 0,25 à 1,46 ; deux essais, 282 femmes ; GRADE : preuves de faible qualité)  une réduction de l'hypertension induite par la grossesse a été observée chez les femmes bénéficiant de conseils diététiques (RR 0,30, IC à 95 % 0,10 à 0,88 ; deux essais, 282 femmes ; : GRADE : preuves de faible qualité). Un essai avait rendu compte de la mortalité périnatale, et aucun décès n'a été observé  (GRADE : preuves de très faible qualité). Aucun des essais n'a rapporté de données concernant les enfants nés de grande taille par rapport à leur âge gestationnel ou quant à la mortalité et la morbidité néonatale.

 Pour les critères de jugement secondaires, aucune différence notable n'a été observée quant aux césariennes (RR moyen 0,98, IC à 95 % 0,78 à 1,24 ; quatre essais, 1194 femmes ; Tau² = 0,02 ; I² = 36 % ; GRADE : preuves de faible qualité) ou aux traumatismes périnéaux (RR 0,83, IC à 95 % 0,23 à 3,08 ; un essai, 759 femmes ; GRADE : preuves de très faible qualité). Les femmes ayant reçu des conseils diététiques ont pris moins de poids pendant la grossesse (différence moyenne (DM) -4,70 kg, IC à 95 % -8,07 à -1,34 ; cinq essais, 1336 femmes ; Tau² = 13,64 ; I² = 96 % ; GRADE : preuves de faible qualité) ; ce résultat doit néanmoins être interprété avec prudence en raison d'une hétérogénéité considérable. Aucune différence claire n'a été observée pour la majorité des critères de jugement secondaires rapportés, dont l'adiposité à l'enfance et à l'âge adulte (épaisseur du pli cutané à six mois) (DM -0,10 mm, IC à 95 % -0,71 à 0,51 ; un essai, 132 enfants ; GRADE : preuves de faible qualité). Les femmes recevant des conseils diététiques avaient un plus faible score du bien-être entre 14 et 28 semaines, une plus grande perte de poids au bout de trois mois, et étaient moins susceptibles d'avoir une intolérance au glucose (un essai).

Les essais n'ont pas rendu compte d'autres critères de jugement secondaires, en particulier ceux liés à la santé à long terme et à l'utilisation des services de santé ou aux coûts. Nous n'avons pas pu évaluer les critères de jugement suivants en utilisant le système GRADE : la dépression postnatale ; le diabète maternel de type 2 ; les hypoglycémies néonatales ; les cas de diabète de type 2 à l'enfance et à l'âge adulte ; et les troubles neurosensoriels.

Les conseils diététiques axés sur une alimentation à base d'aliments à IG faible comparé à une alimentation à base d'aliments à IG modéré ou élevé (quatre essais)

Compte tenu des résultats primaires, aucune différence notable n'a été démontrée dans le risque de développer un DSG (RR 0,91, IC à 95 % 0,63 à 1,31 ; quatre essais, 912 femmes ; GRADE : preuves de faible qualité) ou d'avoir un enfant né de grande taille par rapport à son âge gestationnel (RR moyen 0,60, IC à 95 % 0,19 à 1,86 ; trois essais, 777 bébés ; Tau² = 0,61 ; P = 0,07 ; I² = 62 % ; GRADE : preuves de très faible qualité) entre les groupes ayant reçu des conseils pour une alimentation à base d'aliments à IG faible et modéré à élevé. Les essais n'ont pas rendu compte des éléments suivants : les troubles hypertensifs durant la grossesse ; la mortalité périnatale ; la mortalité et la morbidité néonatale.

Aucune différence claire n'a été démontrée quant aux naissances par césarienne (RR 1,27, IC à 95 % 0,79 à 2,04 ; deux essais, 201 femmes ; GRADE: preuves de très faible qualité) et au gain de poids gestationnel (DM de -1,23 kg, IC à 95 % -4,08 à 1,61 ; quatre essais, 787 femmes ; Tau ² = 7,31 ; I ² = 90 % ; GRADE : preuves de très faible qualité), ou pour les autres critères de jugement secondaires rapportés.

Les essais n'ont pas rendu compte de la majorité des critères de jugement secondaires, dont ceux liés à la santé à long terme, à l'utilisation des services de santé et aux coûts. Nous n'avons pas pu évaluer les critères de jugement suivants en utilisant le système GRADE : les traumatismes du périnée ; la dépression postnatale ; le diabète maternel de type 2 ; l'hypoglycémie néonatale ; l'adiposité durant l'enfance ou l'âge adulte ; le diabète de type 2 ; et les troubles neurosensoriels.

Les conseils diététiques pour une alimentation riche en fibres par rapport à des conseils diététiques standard (un essai)

L'essai portant sur cette comparaison a rapporté des informations concernant deux critères de jugement secondaires. Aucune différence claire entre les groupes recevant des conseils diététiques pour une alimentation riche en fibres comparé à des conseils standard n'a été observée quant à la quantité moyenne de glucose dans le sang (suite à un test de tolérance orale au glucose à 35 semaines), et au poids à la naissance.

Conclusions des auteurs

Des preuves de très faible qualité issues de cinq essais suggèrent une réduction éventuelle du risque de DSG chez les femmes recevant des conseils diététiques par rapport à des soins standard, et des preuves de faible qualité issues de quatre essais suggèrent une absence de différence claire quant aux femmes recevant des conseils diététiques pour une alimentation à base d'aliments à IG faible comparé à une alimentation à base d'aliments à IG modéré ou élevé. Une réduction éventuelle de l'hypertension induite par la grossesse chez les femmes recevant des conseils diététiques a été observée et aucune différence claire n'a été observée pour les autres critères de jugement principaux rapportés. Il y avait peu de données concernant les critères de jugement secondaires.

Pour les critères de jugement évalués en utilisant le système GRADE, les preuves ont été considérées comme étant de qualité faible à très faible, avec rétrogradation du fait des limites des études (risque de biais), des imprécisions et du manque de cohérence.

Davantage de preuves de qualité élevée sont nécessaires pour déterminer les effets des interventions de conseil diététique pendant la grossesse. Les futurs essais devraient être conçus pour surveiller l'observance, les points de vue des femmes ainsi que leurs préférences et avoir une puissance statistique suffisante pour évaluer les effets sur les résultats à court et long terme ; il existe un réel besoin que ces essais recueillent et rapportent des informations quant aux résultats clés de la recherche sur le DSG. Nous avons identifié cinq études en cours et quatre sont en attente de classification. Nous considérerons celles-ci lors de la prochaine mise à jour de cette revue.

Notes de traduction

Traduction réalisée par Martin Vuillème et révisée par Cochrane France

Plain language summary

Dietary advice during pregnancy to prevent gestational diabetes

What is the issue?

Can dietary advice for pregnant women prevent the development of diabetes in pregnancy, known as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), which can cause health complications for women and their babies?

Why is this important?

Women with GDM have an increased risk of developing high blood pressure and protein in their urine during pregnancy (pre-eclampsia), and of having a caesarean section birth. Their babies may grow large and, as a result, be injured at birth, or cause injury to their mothers during birth. Additionally, there can be long-term health problems for women and their babies, including an increased risk of cardiovascular disease or type 2 diabetes. The number of women being diagnosed with GDM is increasing around the world, so finding simple and cost-effective ways to prevent women developing GDM is important.

Carbohydrates are the main nutrient affecting blood glucose after meals. The glycaemic index (GI) can be used to characterise the capability of carbohydrate-based foods to raise these levels. Some diets, for example, those with low-fibre and high-GI foods, can increase the risk of developing GDM. It has been suggested that dietary advice interventions in pregnancy may help to prevent women developing GDM.

What evidence did we find?

We searched for studies on 3 January 2016, and included 11 randomised controlled trials involving 2786 pregnant women and their babies. The quality of the evidence was assessed as low or very low and the overall risk of bias of the trials was unclear to moderate. Six trials compared dietary advice with standard care, four compared advice focused on a low-GI diet with advice for a moderate- to high-GI diet, and one compared dietary advice focused on a high-fibre diet with standard advice.

There was a possible reduction in the development of GDM for women who received dietary advice versus standard care across five trials (1279 women, very low-quality evidence), though no clear difference for GDM was seen between women who received low- versus moderate- to high-GI diet advice across four trials (912 women, low-quality evidence). Two trials (282 women) reported no clear difference between women who received dietary advice versus standard care for pre-eclampsia (low-quality evidence), though fewer women who received dietary advice developed pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (low-quality evidence). There was no clear difference between the groups of women who received low-GI and moderate- to high-GI diet advice, in the number of babies born large-for-gestational age across three trials (777 babies, very low-quality evidence). Only one trial comparing dietary advice with standard care reported on the number of babies who died (either before birth or shortly afterwards), with no deaths in this trial.

There were no clear differences for most of the other outcomes assessed in the trials comparing dietary advice with standard care. including caesarean section, perineal trauma, and child skin-fold thickness at six months. However, women who received dietary advice gained less weight during their pregnancy across five trials (1336 women) (low-quality evidence).

Similarly, there were no clear differences for other outcomes assessed in the trials comparing low- and moderate- to high-GI diet advice, including for caesarean birth and weight gain in pregnancy. The trial comparing dietary advice focused on a high-fibre diet with standard advice found no clear differences for any outcomes.

The included trials did not report on a large number of outcomes listed in this review, including outcomes relating to longer-term health for the women and their babies (as children and adults), and the use and cost of health services.

What does this mean?

Dietary advice interventions for pregnant women may be able to prevent GDM. Based on current trials, however, conclusive evidence is not yet available to guide practice. Further large, well-designed, randomised controlled trials are required to assess the effects of dietary interventions in pregnancy for preventing GDM and improving other health outcomes for mothers and their babies in the short and long term. Five trials are ongoing, and four await classification (pending availability of more information) and will be considered in the next update of this review.

Résumé simplifié

Les conseils nutritionnels pendant la grossesse pour la prévention du diabète gestationnel

Quel est l'enjeu ?

Les conseils diététiques offerts aux femmes enceintes peuvent-ils prévenir le développement du diabète sucré gestationnel (DSG), une maladie pouvant entraîner des complications de santé pour les femmes et leurs bébés durant la grossesse ?

Pourquoi est-ce important ?

Les femmes atteintes de DSG présentent un risque accru de développer de l'hypertension artérielle et de perdre des protéines dans les urines pendant la grossesse (une pré-éclampsie), ou encore d'accoucher par césarienne. Leurs bébés peuvent trop grossir, et en conséquence être blessés à la naissance, ou causer des blessures à leur mère durant l'accouchement. De plus, cette affection peut entraîner des problèmes de santé à long terme pour les femmes et leurs bébés, notamment un risque accru de maladie cardio-vasculaire ou de diabète de type 2. Le nombre de femmes recevant un diagnostic de DSG est en augmentation partout dans le monde; il est ainsi important de trouver des moyens simples, efficaces et rentables pour prévenir le développement du DSG chez les femmes.

Les hydrates de carbone sont les principaux nutriments affectant la quantité de glucides dans le sang (la glycémie) après les repas. L'indice glycémique (IG) peut être utilisé pour caractériser la capacité des aliments à base de glucides à augmenter la glycémie. Certains régimes, par exemple ceux étant pauvres en fibres et riches en aliments à IG élevé, peuvent augmenter le risque de DSG. Il a été suggéré que les interventions de conseil diététique pendant la grossesse peuvent aider à prévenir le DSG chez les femmes.

Les preuves observées :

Nous avons recherché des études le 3 janvier 2016, et nous avons inclus 11 essais contrôlés randomisés portant sur 2786 femmes enceintes ainsi que leurs bébés. La qualité des preuves a été évaluée comme faible ou très faible et le risque de biais global des essais était incertain à modéré. Six essais comparaient des conseils diététiques à des soins standard, quatre ont comparé les conseils axés sur un régime contenant des aliments à faible IG à des conseils axés sur une alimentation à IG modéré ou élevé et un dernier essai comparait les conseils diététiques axés sur un régime alimentaire riche en fibres associé à des conseils standard.

Il y avait une possible réduction du développement du DSG pour les femmes ayant reçu des conseils diététiques par rapport à des soins standard dans cinq essais (1279 femmes, preuves de très faible qualité), bien qu'aucune différence claire quant au DSG n'ait été observée entre les femmes ayant reçu des conseils diététiques axés sur un régime à base d'aliments à IG faible comparé à des conseils pour une alimentation à base de produits à IG modéré ou élevé dans quatre essais (912 femmes, preuves de faible qualité). Deux essais (282 femmes) n'ont pas rapporté de différence claire entre les femmes ayant reçu des conseils diététiques par rapport aux soins standard pour la pré-éclampsie (preuves de faible qualité), bien que moins de femmes ayant reçu des conseils diététiques aient développé une pression artérielle élevée induite par la grossesse (preuves de faible qualité). Il n'y avait aucune différence claire entre les groupes des femmes ayant reçu des conseils diététiques pour une alimentation à base de produits à IG faible ou modéré à élevé quant au nombre de bébés nés de grande taille par rapport à leur âge gestationnel dans trois essais (777 bébés, preuves de très faible qualité). Un seul essai ayant comparé des conseils diététiques aux soins standard a rendu compte du nombre de bébés décédés (soit avant la naissance ou peu après), avec aucun décès rapporté dans celui-ci.

Il n'y avait aucune différence claire pour la plupart des autres critères de jugement évalués dans les essais comparant des conseils diététiques à des soins standard. Notamment les naissances par césarienne, les traumatismes périnéaux, et l'épaisseur des plis cutanés de l'enfant au bout de six mois. Cependant, les femmes ayant reçu des conseils diététiques ont pris moins de poids durant leur grossesse dans cinq essais (1336 femmes) (preuves de faible qualité).

De même, il n'y avait aucune différence claire pour les autres critères de jugement évalués dans les essais comparant des régimes à faible IG à des régimes à IG modéré ou élevé, y compris pour les naissances par césarienne et la prise de poids pendant la grossesse. L'essai comparant des conseils diététiques axés sur un régime riche en fibres à des conseils standard n'a pas trouvé de différence claire quant aux différents critères de jugement.

Les essais inclus n'ont pas rendu compte d'un grand nombre de critères de jugement énumérés dans cette revue, tels que les critères de jugement liés à la santé à plus long terme pour les femmes et leurs bébés (durant leur enfance et à l'âge adulte), à l'utilisation ainsi qu'aux coûts pour les services de santé.

Qu'est-ce que cela signifie ?

Les interventions basées sur des conseils diététiques pour les femmes enceintes pourraient permettre de prévenir le DSG. En nous fiant aux essais actuels, cependant, aucune preuve concluante n'est encore disponible pour permettre de guider la pratique clinique. À grande échelle, d'autres essais contrôlés randomisés bien conçus sont nécessaires pour évaluer les effets des interventions diététiques pendant la grossesse pour la prévention du DSG et l'amélioration d'autres critères de santé pour les mères et leurs bébés à court et à long terme. Cinq essais sont en cours, et quatre sont en attente de classification (jusqu'à ce que des informations supplémentaires soient obtenues) et devront être pris en compte dans la prochaine mise à jour de cette revue.

Notes de traduction

Traduction réalisée par Martin Vuillème et révisée par Cochrane France