Intervention Protocol

Prophylactic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents for the prevention of cystoid macular oedema after cataract surgery

  1. Poorna Abeysiri1,*,
  2. Richard Wormald2,
  3. Catey Bunce3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group

Published Online: 15 JUN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006683.pub2


How to Cite

Abeysiri P, Wormald R, Bunce C. Prophylactic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents for the prevention of cystoid macular oedema after cataract surgery (Protocol). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 6. Art. No.: CD006683. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006683.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, Queen's Hospital, Essex, UK

  2. 2

    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group, ICEH, London, UK

  3. 3

    Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Research and Development Department, London, UK

*Poorna Abeysiri, Queen's Hospital, Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, Rom Valley Way, Romford, Essex, RM7 0AG, UK. uabeysiri@aol.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Amended to reflect a change in scope (see 'What's new')
  2. Published Online: 15 JUN 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows:

The aim of this review is to answer the question: is there sufficient evidence to recommend the prophylactic use of topical NSAIDs in addition to topical steroids postoperatively to reduce the incidence of PMO and associated visual morbidity, compared to current standard practice of topical steroids alone?

This review will be confined to addressing the use of NSAIDs in the prophylaxis of pseudophakic CMO. A separate Cochrane Review on treatment of established CMO has already been published (Sivaprasad 2004) but the effectiveness of NSAIDs in treatment remains uncertain. PMO can lead to permanent structural damage in the central retina, therefore a prevention strategy may be more effective than treatment after the damage has been done.