Intervention Review

Thyroid hormones for acute kidney injury

  1. Sagar U Nigwekar1,*,
  2. Giovanni FM Strippoli2,3,4,5,
  3. Sankar D Navaneethan6

Editorial Group: Cochrane Renal Group

Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 14 NOV 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006740.pub2


How to Cite

Nigwekar SU, Strippoli GFM, Navaneethan SD. Thyroid hormones for acute kidney injury. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD006740. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006740.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

  2. 2

    The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Cochrane Renal Group, Centre for Kidney Research, Westmead, NSW, Australia

  3. 3

    Mario Negri Sud Consortium, Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Epidemiology, Santa Maria Imbaro, Italy

  4. 4

    The University of Sydney, Sydney School of Public Health, Sydney, Australia

  5. 5

    Diaverum, Medical-Scientific Office, Lund, Sweden

  6. 6

    Glickman Urological and Kidney institute, Cleveland Clinic, Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Cleveland, OH, USA

*Sagar U Nigwekar, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. sagarnigs@gmail.com. snigwekar@partners.org.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Acute kidney injury (AKI), which is common in hospitalised patients, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite recent advances in treatment, AKI outcomes have not changed substantially during the past four decades, and incidence is increasing. There is an urgent need to explore novel therapeutic agents and revisit some older drugs to review their roles in the management of AKI. Although thyroid hormone therapy has shown promise in experimental animal studies, clinical efficacy and safety have not been systematically assessed for the management of people with AKI.

Objectives

To evaluate the benefits and harms of thyroid hormones for the treatment of hospitalised adults with AKI of any aetiology.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE. We also checked the reference lists of retrieved studies and articles.

Date of search: November 2012

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs (in which allocation to treatment was obtained by alternation, use of alternate medical records, date of birth or other predictable methods) that compared any dose or form of thyroid hormone therapy alone or in combination with other agents compared with placebo or supplemental treatment (such as furosemide, dopamine, or atrial natriuretic peptide) in adult AKI patients.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed study quality and extracted data. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias assessment tool. For dichotomous outcomes (death, need for renal replacement therapy (RRT), progression to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD)), we planned to express results as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Where continuous scales of measurement were used to assess the effects of treatment (length of hospital stay, durations of AKI and RRT), we planned to use the mean difference (MD).

Main results

Two studies, enrolling 97 participants, met our inclusion criteria. The studies differed significantly in terms of study populations, natural history of AKI (multifactorial AKI in patients with native kidneys versus delayed graft function associated with acute tubular necrosis in transplant recipients), and study interventions; hence, data were not meta-analysed. One study reported a significant increase in the risk of all-cause mortality associated with thyroid hormone interventions compared with placebo (59 participants, RR 3.32, 95% CI 1.21 to 9.12); no deaths were reported in the other study. Both studies reported no significant difference in the need for RRT associated with thyroid hormone therapy when compared to placebo. Neither study reported incidence of progression to ESKD. There was a significantly longer duration of AKI (MD 2.00 days, 95% CI 0.18 to 3.82) and RRT (5.00 days, 95% CI 2.05 to 7.95) associated with thyroid hormone therapy compared with placebo in one study; no differences in durations of AKI (MD 2.00 days, 95% CI -3.53 to 7.53) and RRT (MD 2.00 days, 95% CI -2.36 to 6.36) were noted in the other study. One study reported similar lengths of stay in the intensive care unit and hospital in both intervention and control arms (MD -0.20 days, 95% CI -8.17 to 7.77); the other did not report this outcome. No adverse events were noted to be associated with thyroid hormone therapy in either study. Adequate data were not available to assess changes in kidney function or numbers of RRT sessions. Both included studies were small and methodological quality was suboptimal.

Authors' conclusions

We found a paucity of large, high quality studies to inform analysis of thyroid hormone interventions for the treatment of people with AKI. Current evidence suggested that thyroid hormone therapy may be associated with worse outcomes for patients with established AKI; therefore, its use for these patients should be avoided. The role of thyroid hormone therapy in preventing AKI has not been adequately investigated and may be considered in future clinical studies.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Thyroid hormones for acute kidney injury

Acute kidney injury (AKI) has a number of causes including infection, trauma, kidney stones, toxic drugs, or acquired during hospital treatment. People with AKI suddenly lose kidney function leading to poor urine output and retention of body wastes. In every 1000 people who are discharged from hospital about 30 are diagnosed with AKI; about 6% of all critically ill patients have AKI. Many people with AKI will die from the disease.

AKI treatment aims to restore kidney function using drugs, kidney dialysis, or both. Experimental animal studies of thyroid hormone therapy (a drug treatment) held promise, but uncertainty existed about its effectiveness and safety for people.

We searched the medical literature to investigate the benefits and harms of thyroid hormone therapy for adults with AKI of any cause who were in hospital and found two studies that involved 97 people. There were many differences between study populations, particularly participants' kidney history (some had their own kidneys; others had transplants); and the drugs that were investigated. These differences meant that we were unable to statistically evaluate (meta-analyse) study data.

We found that risk of death from any cause was much higher among people with AKI who received thyroid hormone therapy compared with those who received placebo in one study; no deaths were reported in the second study. Thyroid hormone therapy was found to be no better or worse than placebo in changing patients' needs for kidney dialysis or transplant. People with AKI who received thyroid hormone therapy needed dialysis for longer than those who received placebo in one study, but no differences in AKI and dialysis durations were noted in the other. Lengths of stay in intensive care units and hospital were similar in both those who received thyroid hormone therapy and placebo in one study; but not reported in the other study. Neither study reported if any participants progressed to end-stage kidney disease. We had planned to analyse changes in kidney function and numbers of dialysis sessions, but data reporting was insufficient to make assessments.

The included studies were few in number, small in size, and low in methodological quality. The available evidence suggested that use of thyroid hormone therapy was associated with worse outcomes in patients with established AKI, and therefore, use of these therapies should be avoided for these people.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Hormones thyroïdiennes dans l'insuffisance rénale aiguë

Contexte

L'insuffisance rénale aiguë (IRA), qui est courante chez les patients hospitalisés, est associée à une morbidité et une mortalité significatives. Malgré les récents progrès concernant le traitement, les critères de jugement relatifs à l'IRA n'ont pas changé de manière substantielle au cours des quarante dernières années et l'incidence de l'IRA augmente. Il est urgent d'étudier de nouveaux agents thérapeutiques et de réexaminer certains médicaments anciens afin de réévaluer leur rôle dans la prise en charge de l'IRA. Bien que la thérapie aux hormones thyroïdiennes se soit révélée prometteuse dans des études expérimentales chez l'animal, l'efficacité clinique et la sécurité n'ont pas été évaluées de façon systématique pour la prise en charge des personnes atteintes d'IRA.

Objectifs

Evaluer les avantages et les inconvénients des hormones thyroïdiennes pour le traitement des adultes hospitalisés atteints d'IRA toutes étiologies confondues.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur le rein, CENTRAL, MEDLINE et EMBASE. Nous avons également consulté les listes bibliographiques des études et des articles obtenus.

Date de la dernière recherche : novembre 2012

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) et les quasi-ECR (dans lesquels l'assignation au traitement a été obtenue par l'alternance, le recours à d'autres dossiers médicaux, la date de naissance ou d'autres méthodes prédictibles) qui comparaient une dose ou une forme quelconques de thérapie aux hormones thyroïdiennes seule ou combinée à d'autres agents à un placebo ou à un traitement complémentaire (tel que le furosémide, la dopamine ou le peptide natriurétique atrial) chez les patients adultes atteints d'IRA

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont évalué la qualité méthodologique des études et extrait des données de manière indépendante. La qualité des études incluses a été évaluée à l'aide de l'outil de la Cochrane Collaboration pour l'évaluation du risque de biais. Pour les critères de jugement dichotomiques (décès, besoin d'une thérapie de remplacement rénal (TRR), évolution vers une néphropathie terminale (NPT)), nous avions prévu d'exprimer les résultats sous la forme de risques relatifs (RR) avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 %. Lorsque des échelles de mesure continues avaient été utilisées pour évaluer les effets du traitement (durée d'hospitalisation, durée d'IRA et de TRR), nous avions prévu d'utiliser la différence moyenne (DM).

Résultats Principaux

Deux études, impliquant 97 participants, ont rempli nos critères d'inclusion. Les études différaient significativement en termes de populations d'étude, d'évolution naturelle de l'IRA (IRA multifactorielle chez les patients ayant des reins natifs versus un retard de fonctionnement du greffon associé à une nécrose tubulaire aiguë chez les receveurs de greffe) et d'interventions d'étude ; par conséquent, les données n'ont pas été soumises à une méta-analyse. Une étude a rapporté une augmentation significative du risque de mortalité toutes causes confondues associée aux interventions par administration d'hormones thyroïdiennes comparé au placebo (59 participants, RR 3,32, IC à 95 % 1,21 à 9,12) ; aucun décès n'a été signalé dans l'autre étude. Aucune des deux études n'a signalé de différence significative concernant le besoin de TRR associé à la thérapie aux hormones thyroïdiennes comparé au placebo. Aucune étude n'a indiqué l'incidence de l'évolution vers une NPT. On a observé une durée significativement plus longue de l'IRA (DM 2,00 jours, IC à 95 % 0,18 à 3,82) et de la TRR (5,00 jours, IC à 95 % 2,05 à 7,95) associée à la thérapie aux hormones thyroïdiennes comparé au placebo dans une étude ; aucune différence en termes de durée d'IRA (DM 2,00 jours, IC à 95 % -3,53 à 7,53) et de TRR (DM 2,00 jours, IC à 95 % -2,36 à 6,36) n'a été constatée dans l'autre étude. Une étude a rapporté des durées de séjour en unité de soins intensifs et d'hospitalisation semblables dans le bras d'intervention et le bras témoin (DM -0,20 jours, IC à 95 % -8,17 à 7,77) ; l'autre étude ne rapportait pas ce critère de jugement. Il n'a été observé aucun événement indésirable associé à la thérapie aux hormones thyroïdiennes dans aucune des deux études. Il n'existait pas de données adéquates pour évaluer les changements de la fonction rénale ou le nombre de séances de TRR. Les deux études incluses étaient de petite taille et la qualité méthodologique était sous-optimale.

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous avons découvert qu'il existait peu d'études de grande taille et de grande qualité permettant d'éclairer l'analyse des interventions par administration d'hormones thyroïdiennes pour le traitement des personnes atteintes d'IRA. Les preuves actuelles suggéraient que la thérapie aux hormones thyroïdiennes pouvait être associée à une aggravation des critères d'évaluation pour les patients présentant une IRA établie ; par conséquent, son utilisation pour ces patients doit être évitée. Le rôle de la thérapie aux hormones thyroïdiennes dans la prévention de l'IRA n'a pas été étudié de façon adéquate et peut être examiné dans de futures études cliniques.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Hormones thyroïdiennes dans l'insuffisance rénale aiguë

Hormones thyroïdiennes dans l'insuffisance rénale aiguë

L'insuffisance rénale aiguë (IRA) a différentes causes, notamment une infection, un traumatisme, des calculs rénaux, des médicaments toxiques, ou peut être contractée lors d'un traitement hospitalier. Les personnes atteintes d'IRA perdent soudainement leur fonction rénale, ce qui conduit à une faible production d'urine et à la rétention des déchets produits par l'organisme. Sur 1 000 personnes quittant l'hôpital, environ 30 présentent un diagnostic d'IRA ; environ 6 % de l'ensemble des patients gravement malades ont une IRA. De nombreuses personnes atteintes d'IRA décèderont de cette maladie.

Le traitement contre l'IRA vise à restaurer la fonction rénale au moyen de médicaments, d'une dialyse rénale, ou des deux. Les études expérimentales chez l'animal portant sur la thérapie aux hormones thyroïdiennes (un traitement médicamenteux) étaient prometteuses, mais il existait une incertitude concernant son efficacité et son innocuité pour les personnes.

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans la littérature médicale afin d'étudier les avantages et les inconvénients de la thérapie aux hormones thyroïdiennes pour les adultes hospitalisés atteints d'IRA toutes causes confondues et avons trouvé deux études portant sur 97 personnes. De nombreuses différences ont été relevées entre les populations des études, en particulier concernant les antécédents rénaux des participants (certains avaient encore leurs propres reins, d'autres avaient reçu une greffe de rein) et les médicaments qui étaient étudiés. Ces différences nous ont empêché d'évaluer de façon statistique les données d'étude (par méta-analyse).

Nous avons découvert que le risque de décès toutes causes confondues était bien plus élevé chez les personnes atteintes d'IRA qui recevaient une thérapie aux hormones thyroïdiennes comparé à celles qui recevaient un placebo dans une étude ; aucun décès n'a été signalé dans la seconde étude. La thérapie aux hormones thyroïdiennes ne s'est pas révélée plus efficace ou s'est révélée moins efficace que le placebo pour changer la nécessité de dialyse rénale ou de greffe pour les patients. Les personnes atteintes d'IRA ayant reçu une thérapie aux hormones thyroïdiennes ont eu besoin d'une dialyse pendant plus longtemps que celles ayant reçu un placebo dans une étude, mais aucune différence en termes de durée de l'IRA et de la dialyse n'a été observée dans l'autre étude. La durée des séjours en unité de soins intensifs et la durée d'hospitalisation ont été semblables chez les personnes ayant reçu une thérapie aux hormones thyroïdiennes et celles ayant reçu un placebo dans une étude, mais n'ont pas été indiquées dans l'autre étude. Aucune étude n'a indiqué si des participants avaient connu une évolution jusqu'à une néphropathie en phase terminale. Nous avions prévu d'analyser les changements de fonction rénale et le nombre de séances de dialyse, mais la notification des données n'a pas été suffisante pour procéder à des évaluations.

Les études incluses ont été peu nombreuses, de petite taille et de mauvaise qualité méthodologique. Les preuves disponibles ont suggéré que l'utilisation de la thérapie aux hormones thyroïdiennes était associée à une aggravation des critères d'évaluation chez les patients présentant une IRA établie et, par conséquent, l'utilisation de ces thérapies doit être évitée pour ces personnes.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 5th February, 2013
Traduction financée par: Minist�re du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Sant� Fran�ais