Intervention Review

Day-surgery versus overnight stay surgery for laparoscopic cholecystectomy

  1. Jessica Vaughan,
  2. Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy*,
  3. Brian R Davidson

Editorial Group: Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group

Published Online: 31 JUL 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 13 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006798.pub4

How to Cite

Vaughan J, Gurusamy KS, Davidson BR. Day-surgery versus overnight stay surgery for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD006798. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006798.pub4.

Author Information

  1. Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Department of Surgery, London, UK

*Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy, Department of Surgery, Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, London, NW3 2QG, UK. kurinchi2k@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 31 JUL 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is used to manage symptomatic gallstones. There is considerable controversy regarding whether it should be done as day-surgery or as an overnight stay surgery with regards to patient safety.

Objectives

To assess the impact of day-surgery versus overnight stay laparoscopic cholecystectomy on patient-oriented outcomes such as mortality, severe adverse events, and quality of life.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, and mRCT until September 2012.

Selection criteria

We included randomised clinical trials comparing day-surgery versus overnight stay surgery for laparoscopic cholecystectomy, irrespective of language or publication status.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and independently extracted the data. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using Review Manager 5 analysis. We calculated the risk ratio (RR), mean difference (MD), or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on intention-to-treat or available case analysis.

Main results

We identified a total of six trials at high risk of bias involving 492 participants undergoing day-case laparoscopic cholecystectomy (n = 239) versus overnight stay laparoscopic cholecystectomy (n = 253) for symptomatic gallstones. The number of participants in each trial ranged from 28 to 150. The proportion of women in the trials varied between 74% and 84%. The mean or median age in the trials varied between 40 and 47 years.

With regards to primary outcomes, only one trial reported short-term mortality. However, the trial stated that there were no deaths in either of the groups. We inferred from the other outcomes that there was no short-term mortality in the remaining trials. Long-term mortality was not reported in any of the trials. There was no significant difference in the rate of serious adverse events between the two groups (4 trials; 391 participants; 7/191 (weighted rate 1.6%) in the day-surgery group versus 1/200 (0.5%) in the overnight stay surgery group; rate ratio 3.24; 95% CI 0.74 to 14.09). There was no significant difference in quality of life between the two groups (4 trials; 333 participants; SMD -0.11; 95% CI -0.33 to 0.10).

There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the secondary outcomes of our review: pain (3 trials; 175 participants; MD 0.02 cm visual analogue scale score; 95% CI -0.69 to 0.73); time to return to activity (2 trials, 217 participants; MD -0.55 days; 95% CI -2.18 to 1.08); and return to work (1 trial, 74 participants; MD -2.00 days; 95% CI -10.34 to 6.34). No significant difference was seen in hospital readmission rate (5 trials; 464 participants; 6/225 (weighted rate 0.5%) in the day-surgery group versus 5/239 (2.1%) in the overnight stay surgery group (rate ratio 1.25; 95% CI 0.43 to 3.63) or in the proportion of people requiring hospital readmissions (3 trials; 290 participants; 5/136 (weighted proportion 3.5%) in the day-surgery group versus 5/154 (3.2%) in the overnight stay surgery group; RR 1.09; 95% CI 0.33 to 3.60). No significant difference was seen in the proportion of failed discharge (failure to be discharged as planned) between the two groups (5 trials; 419 participants; 42/205 (weighted proportion 19.3%) in the day-surgery group versus 43/214 (20.1%) in the overnight stay surgery group; RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.65 to 1.41). For all outcomes except pain, the accrued information was far less than the diversity-adjusted required information size to exclude random errors.

Authors' conclusions

Day-surgery appears just as safe as overnight stay surgery in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Day-surgery does not seem to result in improvement in any patient-oriented outcomes such as return to normal activity or earlier return to work. The randomised clinical trials backing these statements are weakened by risks of systematic errors (bias) and risks of random errors (play of chance). More randomised clinical trials are needed to assess the impact of day-surgery laparoscopic cholecystectomy on the quality of life as well as other outcomes of patients.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Day-surgery versus overnight stay surgery for laparoscopic cholecystectomy

This review compares same-day discharge (day-surgery) with overnight stay after keyhole removal of the gallbladder (laparoscopic cholecystectomy) for various conditions affecting the gallbladder but mainly for gallstones causing pain.

Stones that develop in the gallbladder can cause pain in the upper abdomen. This condition is treated by surgical removal of the gallbladder through keyhole surgery, a procedure that is known as laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This procedure may involve the person staying in hospital overnight, but increasingly it is possible to perform the operation and allow them to go home on the same day ('day-surgery'). There is some controversy over whether performing laparoscopic cholecystectomy as day-surgery is safe.

This review aims to investigate the current literature available and provides an overview of the evidence demonstrated in recent clinical trials on the subject. The review authors identified a total of six trials involving 492 participants. Two hundred and thirty-nine people underwent planned laparoscopic cholecystectomy as day-surgery and 253 participants stayed in the hospital overnight after the procedure. All the trials were at high risk of bias (methodological deficiencies that might make it possible to arrive at wrong conclusions by overestimating the benefit or underestimating the harm of the day-surgery or overnight stay procedure). We looked at outcomes that are considered to be important from the perspective of the participant and also the healthcare provider. These outcomes include death, serious complication, quality of life following procedure, pain, how long it took for people to return to normal activity and to return to work, hospital readmissions, and failed discharges (failure to be discharged as planned). There was no significant difference in the proportion who died or the complication rate between the group who underwent day-surgery and those who stayed overnight. Quality of life did not differ significantly between the two groups. There was no significant difference in the time taken for people to return to normal activity or to return to work. There was also no significant difference in the hospital readmission or failed discharge rates. The results suggest that day-surgery is safe for patients. It is important to note that all trials were at risk of bias and the data were sparse, resulting in a considerable chance of arriving at wrong conclusions due to systematic errors (overestimating benefits or underestimating harms of day-surgery or overnight stay) and random errors (play of chance). More randomised trials are needed to investigate the impact of day-surgery and overnight stay on the quality of life and other outcomes of people undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Chirurgie ambulatoire versus chirurgie avec hospitalisation d'une nuit pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique

Contexte

La cholécystectomie laparoscopique est utilisée pour la prise en charge des calculs biliaires symptomatiques. Il existe une importante controverse quant au fait de savoir si elle devrait être pratiquée en chirurgie ambulatoire ou dans le cadre d'une chirurgie avec hospitalisation d'une nuit pour ce qui concerne la sécurité des patients.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'impact de la cholécystectomie laparoscopique en chirurgie ambulatoire versus en chirurgie avec hospitalisation d'une nuit sur les critères de jugement axés sur le patient, tels que la mortalité, les graves événements indésirables et la qualité de vie.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre d'essais contrôlés du groupe Cochrane sur les affections hépato-biliaires et le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) dans The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded et mREC jusqu'en septembre 2012.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais cliniques randomisés comparant la chirurgie ambulatoire versus la chirurgie avec hospitalisation d'une nuit pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique, indépendamment de la langue ou du statut de publication.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont évalué les essais à inclure et extrait les données de façon indépendante. Nous avons analysé les données à la fois avec le modèle à effets fixes et le modèle à effets aléatoires en utilisant le logiciel Review Manager 5. Nous avons calculé le risque relatif (RR), la différence moyenne (DM) ou la différence moyenne standardisée (DMS), avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 %, sur la base d'une analyse en intention de traiter ou d'une analyse des cas disponibles.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons identifié un total de six essais présentant un risque de biais élevé et portant sur 492 participants subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique en chirurgie ambulatoire (n = 239) versus cholécystectomie laparoscopique avec hospitalisation d'une nuit (n = 253) en raison de calculs biliaires symptomatiques. Le nombre de participants dans chaque essai variait de 28 à 150. La proportion de femmes dans les essais variait entre 74 % et 84 %. L'âge moyen ou médian dans les essais variait entre 40 et 47 ans.

Concernant les critères de jugement principaux, seul un essai a rapporté la mortalité à court terme. Cependant, l'essai a indiqué qu'il n'y avait de décès dans aucun des deux groupes. Nous avons déduit d'après les autres critères de jugement qu'il n'y avait pas de mortalité à court terme dans les essais restants. Dans aucun des essais il n'a été rendu compte de la mortalité à long terme. Il n'y avait pas de différence significative en termes de taux d'événements indésirables graves entre les deux groupes (4 essais ; 391 participants ; 7/191 (taux pondéré 1,6 %) dans le groupe de la chirurgie ambulatoire versus 1/200 (0,5 %) dans le groupe de la chirurgie avec hospitalisation d'une nuit ; rapport des taux 3,24 ; IC à 95 % 0,74 à 14,09). Il n'y avait pas de différence significative en termes de qualité de vie entre les deux groupes (4 essais ; 333 participants ; DMS -0,11 ; IC à 95 % -0,33 à 0,10).

Il n'y avait pas de différence significative entre les deux groupes concernant les critères de jugement secondaires de notre revue : douleur (3 essais ; 175 participants ; DM 0,02 cm de score de douleur sur une échelle visuelle analogique ; IC à 95 % -0,69 à 0,73) ; temps nécessaire pour reprendre une activité (2 essais ; 217 participants ; DM -0,55 jours ; IC à 95 % -2,18 à 1,08) ; et reprise du travail (1 essai ; 74 participants ; DM -2,00 jours ; IC à 95 % -10,34 à 6,34). Aucune différence significative n'a été observée en termes de taux de réadmissions à l'hôpital (5 essais ; 464 participants ; 6/225 (taux pondéré 0,5 %) dans le groupe de la chirurgie ambulatoire versus 5/239 (2,1 %) dans le groupe de la chirurgie avec hospitalisation d'une nuit (rapport des taux 1,25 ; IC à 95 % 0,43 à 3,63) ou en termes de proportion de personnes nécessitant des réadmissions à l'hôpital (3 essais ; 290 participants ; 5/136 (proportion pondérée 3,5 %) dans le groupe de la chirurgie ambulatoire versus 5/154 (3,2 %) dans le groupe de la chirurgie avec hospitalisation d'une nuit ; RR 1,09 ; IC à 95 % 0,33 à 3,60). Aucune différence significative n'a été observée en termes de proportion de sorties ratées (absence de sortie au moment prévu) entre les deux groupes (5 essais ; 419 participants ; 42/205 (proportion pondérée 19,3 %) dans le groupe de la chirurgie ambulatoire versus 43/214 (20,1 %) dans le groupe de la chirurgie avec hospitalisation d'une nuit ; RR 0,96 ; IC à 95 % 0,65 à 1,41). Pour tous les critères de jugement excepté la douleur, les informations accumulées ont été très inférieures au volume d'informations requises ajustées par rapport à la diversité pour exclure les erreurs aléatoires.

Conclusions des auteurs

La chirurgie ambulatoire semble tout aussi sûre que la chirurgie avec hospitalisation d'une nuit dans la cholécystectomie laparoscopique. La chirurgie ambulatoire ne semble pas entraîner d'amélioration des critères de jugement axés sur le patient, tels que la reprise de l'activité normale ou une reprise plus précoce du travail. Les essais cliniques randomisés soutenant ces affirmations sont affaiblis par des risques d'erreurs systématiques (biais) et des risques d'erreurs aléatoires (effet du hasard). D'autres essais cliniques randomisés sont nécessaires pour évaluer l'impact de la cholécystectomie laparoscopique en chirurgie ambulatoire sur la qualité de vie, ainsi que sur d'autres critères de jugement concernant les patients.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Chirurgie ambulatoire versus chirurgie avec hospitalisation d'une nuit pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique

Chirurgie ambulatoire versus chirurgie avec hospitalisation d'une nuit pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique

Cette revue compare la sortie le jour même (chirurgie ambulatoire) au séjour d'une nuit à l'hôpital après l'ablation cœlioscopique (à travers une petite ouverture) de la vésicule biliaire (cholécystectomie laparoscopique) pour diverses pathologies affectant la vésicule, mais principalement en raison de calculs biliaires provoquant des douleurs.

Les calculs qui se développent dans la vésicule biliaire peuvent provoquer des douleurs dans l'épigastre. Cette pathologie est traitée par l'ablation chirurgicale de la vésicule biliaire par une opération cœlioscopique, une procédure appelée cholécystectomie laparoscopique. Cette procédure peut impliquer que la personne reste à l'hôpital une nuit, mais, de plus en plus, il est possible de pratiquer l'opération et de laisser le patient rentrer chez lui le même jour (« chirurgie ambulatoire »). Il existe une controverse concernant la sécurité de la pratique de la cholécystectomie laparoscopique en chirurgie ambulatoire.

Cette revue a pour objectif d'examiner la littérature actuellement disponible et de fournir une présentation générale des preuves mises en lumière dans les récents essais cliniques sur le sujet. Les auteurs de la revue ont identifié un total de six essais portant sur 492 participants. Deux cent trente-neuf personnes ont subi une cholécystectomie laparoscopique programmée en chirurgie ambulatoire et 253 participants sont restés une nuit à l'hôpital après l'intervention. Tous les essais présentaient un risque de biais élevé (lacunes méthodologiques qui peuvent permettre de parvenir à de mauvaises conclusions en surestimant le bénéfice ou en sous-estimant le préjudice de la chirurgie ambulatoire ou de la procédure avec hospitalisation d'une nuit). Nous avons examiné des critères de jugement qui sont considérés comme importants du point de vue du participant, mais aussi du prestataire de soins de santé. Ces critères de jugement comprennent le décès, la complication grave, la qualité de vie après la procédure, la douleur, le temps nécessaire à la reprise d'une activité normale et à la reprise du travail, les réadmissions à l'hôpital et les sorties ratées (absence de sortie au moment prévu). Il n'y a pas eu de différence significative en termes de proportion de patients étant décédés ou de taux de complications entre le groupe ayant subi une chirurgie ambulatoire et celui des patients ayant séjourné une nuit à l'hôpital. La qualité de vie n'a pas non plus montré une différence significative entre les deux groupes. Il n'y a pas eu de différence significative en termes de temps nécessaire aux personnes pour reprendre une activité normale ou pour reprendre le travail. Il n'y a pas eu non plus de différence significative en termes de taux de réadmissions à l'hôpital ou de sorties ratées. Les résultats suggèrent que la chirurgie ambulatoire est sûre pour les patients. Il est important de remarquer que tous les essais présentaient un risque de biais et que les données étaient rares, ce qui a donné un risque considérable de parvenir à de mauvaises conclusions en raison d'erreurs systématiques (surestimation des bénéfices ou sous-estimation des préjudices de la chirurgie ambulatoire ou du séjour d'une nuit à l'hôpital) et d'erreurs aléatoires (effet du hasard). D'autres essais randomisés doivent être réalisés pour étudier l'impact de la chirurgie ambulatoire et du séjour d'une nuit à l'hôpital sur la qualité de vie et d'autres critères de jugement pour les personnes subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 4th September, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.