Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Interventions for preventing critical illness polyneuropathy and critical illness myopathy

  1. Greet Hermans1,
  2. Bernard De Jonghe2,
  3. Frans Bruyninckx3,
  4. Greet Van den Berghe4,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group

Published Online: 30 JAN 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 4 OCT 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006832.pub3


How to Cite

Hermans G, De Jonghe B, Bruyninckx F, Van den Berghe G. Interventions for preventing critical illness polyneuropathy and critical illness myopathy. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD006832. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006832.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    KU Leuven, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Leuven, Belgium

  2. 2

    Centre Hospitalier de Poissy-Saint-Germain, Réanimation Médico-Chirurgicale, Poissy, France

  3. 3

    KU Leuven, University Hospitals, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Leuven, Belgium

  4. 4

    KU Leuven, University Hospitals, Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Leuven, Belgium

*Greet Van den Berghe, Department of Intensive Care Medicine, KU Leuven, University Hospitals, Herestraat 49,3000, Leuven, Belgium. Greta.vandenberghe@med.kuleuven.be.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 30 JAN 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Critical illness polyneuropathy or myopathy (CIP/CIM) is a frequent complication in the intensive care unit (ICU) and is associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation, longer ICU stay and increased mortality. This is an interim update of a review first published in 2009 (Hermans 2009). It has been updated to October 2011, with further potentially eligible studies from a December 2013 search characterised as awaiting assessment.

Objectives

To systematically review the evidence from RCTs concerning the ability of any intervention to reduce the incidence of CIP or CIM in critically ill individuals.

Search methods

On 4 October 2011, we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE. We checked the bibliographies of identified trials and contacted trial authors and experts in the field. We carried out an additional search of these databases on 6 December 2013 to identify recent studies.

Selection criteria

All randomised controlled trials (RCTs), examining the effect of any intervention on the incidence of CIP/CIM in people admitted to adult medical or surgical ICUs. The primary outcome was the incidence of CIP/CIM in ICU, based on electrophysiological or clinical examination. Secondary outcomes included duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of ICU stay, death at 30 and 180 days after ICU admission and serious adverse events from the treatment regimens.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently extracted the data and assessed the risk of bias in included studies.

Main results

We identified five trials that met our inclusion criteria. Two trials compared intensive insulin therapy (IIT) to conventional insulin therapy (CIT). IIT significantly reduced CIP/CIM in the screened (n = 825; risk ratio (RR) 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.55 to 0.77) and total (n = 2748; RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.82) population randomised. IIT reduced duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU stay and 180-day mortality, but not 30-day mortality compared with CIT. Hypoglycaemia increased with IIT but did not cause early deaths.

One trial compared corticosteroids with placebo (n = 180). The trial found no effect of treatment on CIP/CIM (RR 1.27, 95% CI 0.77 to 2.08), 180-day mortality, new infections, glycaemia at day seven, or episodes of pneumonia, but did show a reduction of new shock events.

In the fourth trial, early physical therapy reduced CIP/CIM in 82/104 evaluable participants in ICU (RR 0.62. 95% CI 0.39 to 0.96). Statistical significance was lost when we performed a full intention-to-treat analysis (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.60 to 1.08). Duration of mechanical ventilation but not ICU stay was significantly shorter in the intervention group. Hospital mortality was not affected but 30- and 180-day mortality results were not available. No adverse effects were noticed.

The last trial found a reduced incidence of CIP/CIM in 52 evaluable participants out of a total of 140 who were randomised to electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) versus no stimulation (RR 0.32, 95% CI 0.10 to 1.01). These data were prone to bias due to imbalances between treatment groups in this subgroup of participants. After we imputed missing data and performed an intention-to-treat analysis, there was still no significant effect (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.15). The investigators found no effect on duration of mechanical ventilation and noted no difference in ICU mortality, but did not report 30- and 180-day mortality.

We updated the searches in December 2013 and identified nine potentially eligible studies that will be assessed for inclusion in the next update of the review.

Authors' conclusions

There is moderate quality evidence from two large trials that intensive insulin therapy reduces CIP/CIM, and high quality evidence that it reduces duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU stay and 180-day mortality, at the expense of hypoglycaemia. Consequences and prevention of hypoglycaemia need further study. There is moderate quality evidence which suggests no effect of corticosteroids on CIP/CIM and high quality evidence that steroids do not affect secondary outcomes, except for fewer new shock episodes. Moderate quality evidence suggests a potential benefit of early rehabilitation on CIP/CIM which is accompanied by a shorter duration of mechanical ventilation but without an effect on ICU stay. Very low quality evidence suggests no effect of EMS, although data are prone to bias. Strict diagnostic criteria for CIP/CIM are urgently needed for research purposes. Large RCTs need to be conducted to further explore the role of early rehabilitation and EMS and to develop new preventive strategies.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions to reduce neuromuscular complications acquired during the acute phase of critical illness

Review question

We reviewed the evidence about the effect of treatments to prevent or reduce complications affecting the nerves or muscles during the severe, early phase of critical illness. These complications are called critical illness polyneuropathy or myopathy (CIP/CIM) and can affect nerves, muscles or both.

Background

CIP/CIM is a frequent complication of critical care. CIP/CIM causes weakness of limbs and of muscles used for breathing. These difficulties can make it difficult for the person to come off a ventilator and start rehabilitation. CIP/CIM can also mean a longer stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and increases the risk of death. Recovery takes weeks or months and in severe cases it may be incomplete or absent. Prevention and treatment of CIP/CIM is therefore very important.

Study characteristics

We searched for all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that looked at the effects of any treatment to prevent CIP/CIM in adults admitted to an ICU. We identified and analysed five trials that were suitable for inclusion in our review. These trials studied four treatments: intensive insulin therapy (IIT), corticosteroid therapy, early rehabilitation, and electrical muscle stimulation.

Key results and quality of the evidence

Two trials, with a total of 825 adults staying in ICU for one week or more, studied the effect of IIT versus conventional insulin therapy (CIT) on the incidence of CIP/CIM. IIT aimed to produce normal blood sugar levels (80 to 110 mg/dL) and CIT aimed to avoid high blood sugar (blood sugar over 215 mg/dL). Combining the results of both trials showed moderate quality evidence that IIT reduces CIP/CIM. There was high quality evidence that it reduced time spent on a ventilator, ICU stay and 180-day mortality but not 30-day mortality. There were more episodes of low blood sugar with IIT. Although there was not an increase in deaths within 24 hours of episodes of low blood sugar, low blood sugar remains a concern as it can damage the brain. Neither trial reported the degree of limb weakness or on physical rehabilitation. The results came from a subgroup of people who were in the ICU for a long time, which may also limit the conclusions.

The third trial compared corticosteroid therapy with a placebo in 180 people with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Moderate quality evidence suggested no effect of corticosteroids on CIP/CIM (in 92 participants evaluated). High quality evidence showed no effect on 180-day mortality, new serious infections, blood glucose levels on day seven or episodes of suspected or probable pneumonia. There were fewer episodes of shock (a life-threatening condition where there is a lack of blood flow to vital organs).

The fourth trial was of on early rehabilitation in 104 participants in a medical ICU. There was moderate quality evidence of a reduction in CIP/CIM in the 82 participants who could be evaluated in the ICU. This effect was not significant when imputation to intention-to-treat analysis was performed. Early rehabilitation reduced the duration of mechanical ventilation but did not affect ICU stay or deaths. The trial reported no serious adverse events.

Finally, a trial compared the effect of EMS of the lower limbs to no stimulation. The trial included 140 participants but provided results for only 52 of them. It supplied very low quality evidence that EMS was without effect in preventing CIP/CIM. There was no effect on duration of mechanical ventilation or deaths. Because the EMS and control groups differed in type and severity of disease,   these findings may not be reliable. Results were even less significant when imputation to intention-to-treat analysis was performed. The study found no effect of EMS on duration of mechanical ventilation or deaths.

The evidence is up to date as of October 2011. We re-ran the search for studies in December 2013 and identified nine additional potentially eligible studies that we will assess in the next update of the review.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour prévenir la polyneuropathie et la myopathie de réanimation

Contexte

La polyneuropathie de réanimation (PNR) et la myopathie de réanimation (MPR) sont des complications fréquentes dans les USIR et elles sont associées à une prolongation de la ventilation mécanique, une plus longue durée de séjour dans ces unités et une mortalité accrue. Ceci est une mise à jour provisoire d'une revue publiée pour la première fois en 2009 (Hermans 2009). Elle a été mise à jour jusqu'à octobre 2011, avec d'autres études potentiellement éligibles issues d'une recherche de décembre 2013 en attente d'évaluation.

Objectifs

Examiner systématiquement les preuves issues d'ECR concernant la capacité de toute intervention visant à réduire l'incidence des PNR et MPR chez les individus gravement malades.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Le 4 octobre 2011, nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les affections neuromusculaires, CENTRAL, MEDLINE et EMBASE. Nous avons vérifié les bibliographies des essais identifiés et contacté les auteurs des essais et des experts dans le domaine. Nous avons effectué une recherche supplémentaire de ces bases de données le 6 décembre 2013 pour identifier des études récentes.

Critères de sélection

Tous les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), examinant l'effet de toute intervention sur l'incidence des PNR/MPR chez les patients admis en USIR médicales ou chirurgicales adultes. Le critère de jugement principal était l'incidence des PNR/MPR en USIR, sur la base de l'électroneuromyographie ou de l'examen clinique. Les critères de jugement secondaires incluaient la durée de la ventilation mécanique, la durée du séjour en USIR, le décès à 30 et 180 jours après l'admission dans l'USIR et les événements indésirables graves des schémas thérapeutiques.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais dans les études incluses.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons identifié cinq essais qui répondaient à nos critères d'inclusion. Deux essais comparaient une insulinothérapie intensive (ITI) à une insulinothérapie conventionnelle (ITC). L'ITI réduisait significativement les PNR/MPR d'une population randomisée, dans une sélection de la population (n = 825 ; risque relatif (RR) 0,65, intervalle de confiance à 95 % (IC) de 0,55 à 0,77) et dans la population totale (n = 2748 ; RR 0,70, IC à 95 % 0,60 à 0,82). L'ITI réduisait la durée de la ventilation mécanique la durée de séjour en USIR et la mortalité à 180 jours, mais pas la mortalité à 30 jours par rapport à l'ITC. L'ITI augmentait l'hypoglycémie mais n'était pas la cause de décès précoces.

Un essai comparait les corticostéroïdes à un placebo (n = 180). L'essai n'a trouvé aucun effet du traitement sur les PNR/MPR (RR 1,27, IC à 95 % 0,77 à 2,08), la mortalité à 180 jours, de nouvelles infections, la glycémie à sept jours ou des épisodes de pneumonie mais montrait une baisse de nouveaux événements de choc.

Dans le quatrième essai, la kinésithérapie précoce réduisait les PNR/MPR chez 82 / 104 participants évaluables en USIR (RR de 0.62 IC à 95 % 0,39 à 0,96). La signification statistique a disparu lorsque nous avons effectué une analyse en intention de traiter (RR 0,81, IC à 95 % 0,60 à 1,08). La durée de ventilation mécanique, mais pas la durée de séjour en USIR, était significativement plus courte dans le groupe d'intervention. La mortalité à l'hôpital n'était pas affectée, mais les résultats de la mortalité à 30 et 180 jours n'étaient pas disponibles. Aucun effet indésirable n'était observé.

Le dernier essai avait constaté une incidence réduite des PNR/MPR chez 52 participants évaluables sur un total de 140 qui avaient été randomisés pour la stimulation musculaire électrique (SME) versus l'absence de stimulation (RR 0,32, IC à 95 % 0,10 à 1,01). Ces données étaient sujettes à biais en raison des déséquilibres entre les groupes de traitement dans ce sous-groupe de participants. Après imputation des données manquantes et réalisation d'une analyse en intention de traiter, il n'y avait toujours aucun effet significatif (RR 0,94, IC à 95 % 0,78 à 1,15). Les investigateurs n'ont trouvé aucun effet sur la durée de la ventilation mécanique et n'ont noté aucune différence en termes de mortalité en USIR, mais n'ont pas rapporté la mortalité à 30 et 180 jours.

Nous avons mis à jour les recherches en décembre 2013 et identifié neuf études potentiellement éligibles qui seront évaluées pour inclusion dans la prochaine mise à jour de la revue.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il existe des preuves de qualité modérée issues de deux essais à grande échelle que l'insulinothérapie intensive réduit les PNR/MPR et des preuves de haute qualité indiquant qu'elle réduisait la durée de la ventilation mécanique, la durée de séjour en USIR et la mortalité à 180 jours, au prix d'hypoglycémies. Les conséquences et la prévention de l'hypoglycémie nécessitent des études supplémentaires. Il existe des preuves de qualité modérée qui suggèrent aucun effet des corticostéroïdes sur les PNR/MPR et des preuves de haute qualité indiquant que les stéroïdes n'affectent pas les critères de jugement secondaires, sauf pour un moins grand nombre de nouveaux épisodes de choc. Des preuves de qualité modérée suggèrent un possible bénéfice de la rééducation précoce sur les PNR/MPR qui s'accompagne d'une plus courte durée de la ventilation mécanique, mais sans un effet sur la durée de séjour en USIR. Des preuves de très faible qualité ne suggèrent aucun effet de la SME, mais les données sont sujettes à biais. Des critères de diagnostic stricts des PNR/MPR sont nécessaires de toute urgence pour la recherche.. Des ECR à grande échelle doivent être réalisés afin d'étudier le rôle de la rééducation précoce et de la SME et afin de développer de nouvelles stratégies préventives.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour prévenir la polyneuropathie et la myopathie de réanimation

Les interventions visant à réduire les complications neuromusculaires acquises pendant la phase aiguë d'une maladie grave

Question de la revue

Nous avons examiné les preuves concernant les effets des traitements pour prévenir ou réduire les complications affectant les nerfs et les muscles, pendant la phase précoce de la criticité d'une maladie grave. Ces complications sont appelées polyneuropathie de réanimation (PNR) et myopathie de réanimation (MPR) et peuvent affecter les nerfs, les muscles ou les deux.

Contexte

Les PNR/MPR sont des complications fréquentes des soins intensifs et de réanimation. Une PNR/MPR entraîne une faiblesse des membres inférieurs et des muscles respiratoires. Ces difficultés peuvent rendre difficile le sevrage du ventilateur et le début de la rééducation. Une PNR/MPR peut également signifier un allongement du séjour en unité de soins intensifs et de réanimation (USIR) et augmente le risque de décès. Le rétablissement prend des semaines ou des mois et dans les cas graves, il peut être incomplet ou inexistant. La prévention et le traitement des PNR/MPR sont donc très importants.

Les caractéristiques de l'étude

Nous avons recherché tous les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) ayant examiné les effets de tout traitement pour prévenir une PNR/MPR chez les adultes admis en unités de soins intensifs et de réanimation. Nous avons identifié et analysé cinq essais qui ont pu être inclus dans notre revue. Ces essais avaient étudié les quatre traitements suivants: l'insulinothérapie intensive (ITI), la corticothérapie, la rééducation précoce et la stimulation musculaire électrique.

Résultats principaux et qualité des preuves

Deux essais, avec un total de 825 adultes hospitalisés en USIR pendant une semaine ou plus ont étudié l'effet de l'ITI versus l'insulinothérapie conventionnelle(ITC) sur l'incidence des PNR/MPR. L'ITI vise à établir des niveaux de glycémie normale (80 à 110 mg/dL) alors que l'ITC vise à éviter une glycémie élevée (sucre sanguin à plus de 215 mg/dL). La combinaison des résultats des deux essais a montré des preuves de qualité modérée que l'ITI réduit les PNR/MPR. Il y avait des preuves de haute qualité indiquant que l'ITI réduisait le temps passé sous ventilation, la durée de séjour en USIR et la mortalité à 180 jours mais pas la mortalité à 30 jours. Il y a plus d'épisodes de faible taux de sucre dans le sang avec l'ITI. Bien qu'il n'y eut pas d'augmentation des décès dans les 24 heures suivant les épisodes de faible taux de sucre dans le sang, un faible taux de sucre sanguin reste un sujet d'inquiétude car cela peut endommager le cerveau. Aucun essai n'a rapporté le degré de faiblesse des membres ou sur la rééducation physique. Les résultats provenaient d'un sous-groupe de personnes qui sont restées longtemps en USIR, ce qui peut aussi limiter les conclusions.

Le troisième essai comparait un traitement corticoïde à un placebo chez 180 patients atteints d'un syndrome de détresse respiratoire aigüe (SDRA). Des preuves de qualité modérée suggèrent une absence d'effet des corticostéroïdes sur les PNR/MPR (92 participants évalués). Des preuves de qualité élevée n'ont montré aucun effet sur la mortalité à 180 jours, les infections graves nouvelles, les niveaux de glycémie au septième jour ou les épisodes de pneumonie suspectée ou probable. Il y avait moins d'épisodes de choc (une affection potentiellement mortelle où il existe un manque de débit sanguin vers les organes vitaux).

Le quatrième essai concernait la rééducation précoce chez 104 participants dans un service de réanimation médicale. Il y avait des preuves de qualité moyenne de la réduction des PNR/MPR pour les 82 participants qui ont pu y être évalués. Cet effet n'était pas significatif lorsque leur imputation dans une analyse en intention de traiter a été réalisée. La rééducation précoce a réduit la durée de la ventilation mécanique mais n'affectait pas la durée de séjour en réanimation ou le décès. L'essai n'a signalé aucun événement indésirable grave.

Enfin, un essai comparait l'effet de la stimulation musculaire électrique (SME) des membres inférieurs à l'absence de stimulation. L'essai avait inclus 140 participants mais n'a fourni des résultats que pour 52 d'entre eux. Il a fourni des preuves de très faible qualité que la SME était sans effet dans la prévention des PMR/MPR. Il n'y avait aucun effet sur la durée de ventilation mécanique ou le décès. Parce que les groupes ESM et témoin différaient dans le type et la gravité de la maladie, ces résultats pourraient ne pas être fiables. Les résultats étaient encore moins significatifs lorsque leur imputation dans une analyse en intention de traiter a été réalisée. L'étude n'a trouvé aucun effet de l'ESM sur la durée de ventilation mécanique ou le décès.

Les preuves sont à jour en octobre 2011. Nous avons relancé les recherches d'études en décembre 2013 et identifié neuf études supplémentaires potentiellement éligibles que nous évaluerons dans la prochaine mise à jour de la revue.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 7th July, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé