Intervention Review

Low pressure versus standard pressure pneumoperitoneum in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

  1. Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy*,
  2. Jessica Vaughan,
  3. Brian R Davidson

Editorial Group: Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group

Published Online: 18 MAR 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 19 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006930.pub3


How to Cite

Gurusamy KS, Vaughan J, Davidson BR. Low pressure versus standard pressure pneumoperitoneum in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD006930. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006930.pub3.

Author Information

  1. Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Department of Surgery, London, UK

*Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy, Department of Surgery, Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Royal Free Hospital, Rowland Hill Street, London, NW3 2PF, UK. k.gurusamy@ucl.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 18 MAR 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

A pneumoperitoneum of 12 to 16 mm Hg is used for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Lower pressures are claimed to be safe and effective in decreasing cardiopulmonary complications and pain.

Objectives

To assess the benefits and harms of low pressure pneumoperitoneum compared with standard pressure pneumoperitoneum in people undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded until February 2013 to identify randomised trials,

using search strategies.

Selection criteria

We considered only randomised clinical trials, irrespective of language, blinding, or publication status for inclusion in the review.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently identified trials and independently extracted data. We calculated the risk ratio (RR), mean difference (MD), or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using both fixed-effect and random-effects models with RevMan 5 based on available case analysis.

Main results

A total of 1092 participants randomly assigned to the low pressure group (509 participants) and the standard pressure group (583 participants) in 21 trials provided information for this review on one or more outcomes. Three additional trials comparing low pressure pneumoperitoneum with standard pressure pneumoperitoneum (including 179 participants) provided no information for this review. Most of the trials included low anaesthetic risk participants undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. One trial including 140 participants was at low risk of bias. The remaining 20 trials were at high risk of bias. The overall quality of evidence was low or very low. No mortality was reported in either the low pressure group (0/199; 0%) or the standard pressure group (0/235; 0%) in eight trials that reported mortality. One participant experienced the outcome of serious adverse events (low pressure group 1/179, 0.6%; standard pressure group 0/215, 0%; seven trials; 394 participants; RR 3.00; 95% CI 0.14 to 65.90; very low quality evidence). Quality of life, return to normal activity, and return to work were not reported in any of the trials. The difference between groups in the conversion to open cholecystectomy was imprecise (low pressure group 2/269, adjusted proportion 0.8%; standard pressure group 2/287, 0.7%; 10 trials; 556 participants; RR 1.18; 95% CI 0.29 to 4.72; very low quality evidence) and was compatible with an increase, a decrease, or no difference in the proportion of conversion to open cholecystectomy due to low pressure pneumoperitoneum. No difference in the length of hospital stay was reported between the groups (five trials; 415 participants; MD -0.30 days; 95% CI -0.63 to 0.02; low quality evidence). Operating time was about two minutes longer in the low pressure group than in the standard pressure group (19 trials; 990 participants; MD 1.51 minutes; 95% CI 0.07 to 2.94; very low quality evidence).

Authors' conclusions

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be completed successfully using low pressure in approximately 90% of people undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. However, no evidence is currently available to support the use of low pressure pneumoperitoneum in low anaesthetic risk patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The safety of low pressure pneumoperitoneum has to be established. Further well-designed trials are necessary, particularly in people with cardiopulmonary disorders who undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Low pressure pneumoperitoneum versus standard pressure pneumoperitoneum in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

Background

The liver produces bile, which has many functions, including elimination of waste processed by the liver and digestion of fat. Bile is temporarily stored in the gallbladder (an organ situated underneath the liver) before it reaches the small bowel. Concretions in the gallbladder are called gallstones. Gallstones are present in about 5% to 25% of the adult Western population. Between 2% and 4% become symptomatic within a year. Symptoms include pain related to the gallbladder (biliary colic), inflammation of the gallbladder (cholecystitis), obstruction to the flow of bile from the liver and gallbladder into the small bowel resulting in jaundice (yellowish discolouration of the body usually most prominently noticed in the white of the eye, which turns yellow), bile infection (cholangitis), and inflammation of the pancreas, an organ that secretes digestive juices and harbours the insulin-secreting cells that maintain blood sugar level (pancreatitis). Removal of the gallbladder (cholecystectomy) is currently considered the best treatment option for patients with symptomatic gallstones. This is generally performed by key-hole surgery (laparoscopic cholecystectomy). Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is generally performed by inflating the tummy with carbon dioxide gas to permit the organs and structures within the tummy to be viewed so that the surgery can be performed. The gas pressure used to inflate the tummy is usually 12 mm Hg to 16 mm Hg (standard pressure). However, this causes alterations in the blood circulation and may be detrimental. To overcome this, lower pressure has been suggested as an alternative to standard pressure. However, using lower pressure may limit the surgeon's view of the organs and structures within the tummy, possibly resulting in inadvertent damage to the organs or structures. The review authors set out to determine whether it is preferable to perform laparoscopic cholecystectomy using low pressure or standard pressure. A systematic search of medical literature was performed to identify studies that provided information on the above question. The review authors obtained information from randomised trials only because such types of trials provide the best information if conducted well. Two review authors independently identified the trials and collected the information.

Study characteristics

A total of 1092 patients were studied in 21 trials. Patients were assigned to a low pressure group (509 patients) or a standard pressure group (583 patients). The choice of treatment was determined by a method similar to the toss of a coin. Most of the trials included low surgical risk patients undergoing planned laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Key results

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy could be completed successfully using low pressure in approximately 90% of people undergoing this procedure. No deaths were reported in either low pressure or standard pressure groups in eight trials that reported deaths (total of 434 patients in both groups). Seven trials with 394 patients described complications related to surgery. One participant experienced the outcome of serious adverse events (low pressure group 1/179, 0.6%; standard pressure group 0/215, 0%). Quality of life, return to normal activity, and return to work were not reported in any of the trials. The difference in the percentage of people undergoing conversion to open operation (from key-hole operation) between the low pressure group (2/269; 0.8%) and the standard pressure group (2/287; 0.7%) was imprecise. This was reported in 10 studies. No difference was noted in the length of hospital stay between the groups. Operating time was about two minutes longer (very low quality evidence) in the low pressure group than in the standard pressure group. Currently no evidence is available to support the use of low pressure pneumoperitoneum in low surgical risk patients undergoing planned laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The safety of low pressure pneumoperitoneum has to be established.

Quality of evidence

Only one trial including 140 participants was at low risk of bias (low chance of arriving at wrong conclusions because of study design). The remaining 20 trials were at high risk of bias (high chance of arriving at wrong conclusions because of trial design). The overall quality of evidence was very low.

Future research

Further well-designed trials are necessary, particularly in high surgical risk patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Pneumopéritoine provoqué par pression faible versus pression standard dans la cholécystectomie laparoscopique

Contexte

Un pneumopéritoine de 12 à 16 mm Hg est utilisé pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique. Les pressions inférieures sont prétendument sûres et efficaces pour réduire les complications cardio-pulmonaires et la douleur.

Objectifs

Évaluer les bénéfices et les inconvénients du pneumopéritoine à faible pression par rapport au pneumopéritoine à pression standard chez les personnes subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) dans la Bibliothèque Cochrane, MEDLINE, EMBASE et Science Citation Index Expanded jusqu'à février 2013 pour identifier les essais randomisés, en utilisant diverses stratégies de recherche.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons uniquement pris en compte pour inclusion dans la revue les essais cliniques randomisés, indépendamment de la langue, de la mise en aveugle ou du statut de publication.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont identifié les essais et extrait les données de manière indépendante. Nous avons calculé le risque relatif (RR), la différence moyenne (DM) ou la différence moyenne standardisée (DMS) avec intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 % à l'aide de modèles à effets fixes et à effets aléatoires en utilisant le logiciel RevMan 5, sur la base de l'analyse des cas disponibles.

Résultats Principaux

Un total de 1 092 participants assignés au hasard au groupe de pression faible (509 participants) et au groupe de pression standard (583 participants) dans 21 essais ont fourni des informations pour cette revue sur un ou plusieurs critères de jugement. Trois autres essais comparant le pneumopéritoine à faible pression au pneumopéritoine à pression standard (incluant 179 participants) n'ont pas fourni de données pour cette revue. La plupart des essais portaient sur des patients à faible risque anesthésique subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique élective. Un essai portant sur 140 participants était à faible risque de biais. Les 20 autres essais étaient à risque élevé de biais. La qualité globale des preuves était faible ou très faible. Aucune mortalité n'était rapportée, ni dans le groupe de pression faible (0/199 ; 0 %) ni dans le groupe de pression standard (0/235 ; 0 %), dans les huit essais qui rendaient compte de la mortalité. Un participant a présenté le critère de jugement d'événements indésirables graves (groupe de pression faible 1/179, 0,6 % ; groupe de de pression standard 0/215, 0 % ; sept essais ; 394 participants ; RR 3,00 ; IC à 95 % 0,14 à 65,90 ; preuves de très faible qualité). La qualité de vie, la reprise des activités normales et le retour au travail n'étaient rapportés dans aucun des essais. La différence entre les groupes dans le passage à une cholécystectomie ouverte était imprécise (groupe de pression faible 2/269, proportion ajustée 0,8 % ; groupe de pression standard 2/287, 0,7 % ; 10 essais ; 556 participants ; RR 1,18 ; IC à 95 % 0,29 à 4,72 ; preuves de très faible qualité) et était compatible avec une augmentation, une réduction ou aucune différence dans la proportion de conversion en cholécystectomie ouverte en raison du pneumopéritoine à faible pression. Aucune différence dans la durée du séjour à l'hôpital n'a été rapportée entre les groupes (cinq essais ; 415 participants ; DM -0,30 jours ; IC à 95 % -0,63 à 0,02 ; preuves de faible qualité). La durée opératoire était d'environ deux minutes de plus dans le groupe de pression faible que dans le groupe de pression standard (19 essais ; 990 participants ; DM 1,51 minutes ; IC à 95 % 0,07 à 2,94 ; preuves de très faible qualité).

Conclusions des auteurs

La cholécystectomie laparoscopique peut être menée à bien à l'aide d'une pression faible chez environ 90 % des personnes subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique. Cependant, aucune preuve n'est disponible à l'heure actuelle pour soutenir l'utilisation du pneumopéritoine à faible pression chez les patients à faible risque anesthésique subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique élective. La sécurité d'emploi du pneumopéritoine à faible pression doit encore être établie. D'autres essais bien conçus sont nécessaires, en particulier chez les personnes atteintes de troubles cardio-pulmonaires subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Pneumopéritoine provoqué par pression faible versus pression standard dans la cholécystectomie laparoscopique

Pneumopéritoine provoqué par pression faible comparé au pneumopéritoine provoqué par pression standard dans la cholécystectomie laparoscopique

Contexte

Le foie produit la bile qui a de nombreuses fonctions, notamment l'élimination des déchets traités par le foie et la digestion des graisses. La bile est stockée temporairement dans la vésicule biliaire (un organe situé sous le foie) avant de parvenir à l'intestin grêle. Les concrétions dans la vésicule biliaire sont appelés calculs biliaires. Environ 5 % à 25 % de la population adulte occidentale ont des calculs biliaires. Entre 2 % et 4 % deviennent symptomatiques dans l'année. Les symptômes incluent la douleur liée à la vésicule biliaire (colique hépatique), l'inflammation de la vésicule biliaire (cholécystite), l'obstruction à l'écoulement de la bile du foie et de la vésicule biliaire dans l'intestin grêle entraînant un ictère (décoloration jaunâtre de l'organisme généralement principalement observée dans le blanc de l'œil, qui devient jaune), l'infection de la bile (angiocholite), et l'inflammation du pancréas, un organe sécrétant des fluides digestives et hébergeant les cellules productrices d'insuline qui maintiennent le niveau de sucre sanguin (pancréatite). L'ablation de la vésicule biliaire (cholécystectomie) est actuellement considérée comme la meilleure option de traitement pour les patients souffrant de calculs biliaires symptomatiques. Elle est généralement réalisée par chirurgie mini-invasive (cholécystectomie laparoscopique). Pour effectuer une cholécystectomie laparoscopique, le ventre est généralement gonflé avec du gaz carbonique pour permettre de voir les organes et les structures à l'intérieur de sorte de pouvoir opérer. La pression de gaz utilisée pour gonfler le ventre est généralement de 12 mm Hg à 16 mm Hg (pression standard). Cependant, cela entraîne des altérations de la circulation sanguine et peut être préjudiciable. Afin de surmonter ce problème, l'utilisation d'une pression plus faible a été proposée comme une alternative à la pression standard. Toutefois, l'utilisation d'une pression plus faible peut limiter la vue du chirurgien sur les organes et les structures dans le ventre, ce qui pourrait éventuellement entraîner des dommages par inadvertance à ces organes ou structures. Les auteurs de la revue ont cherché à déterminer s'il est préférable de réaliser une cholécystectomie laparoscopique à l'aide d'une pression faible ou de la pression standard. Une recherche systématique de la littérature médicale a été réalisée afin d'identifier des études fournissant des informations sur cette question. Les auteurs de la revue ont extrait des données uniquement à partir d'essais randomisés, car ce type d'essais fournissent les meilleures informations quand ils sont menés correctement. Deux auteurs de la revue ont de manière indépendante identifié les essais et recueilli les informations.

Caractéristiques des études

Un total de 1092 patients ont été étudiés dans 21 essais. Les patients ont été assignés à un groupe de pression faible (509 patients) ou à un groupe de pression standard (583 patients). Le choix du traitement a été déterminé par une méthode similaire au pile ou face. La plupart des essais portaient sur des patients à faible risque chirurgical subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique programmée.

Résultats principaux

La cholécystectomie laparoscopique a pu être menée à bien à l'aide d'une pression faible chez environ 90 % des personnes subissant cette procédure. Aucun décès n'a été rapporté dans les groupes de pression faible ou standard dans les huit essais ayant rendu compte des décès (un total de 434 patients dans les deux groupes). Sept essais avec 394 patients ont décrit les complications liées à la chirurgie. Un participant a présenté le critère de jugement d'événements indésirables graves (groupe de pression faible 1/179, 0,6 % ; groupe de pression standard 0/215, 0 %). La qualité de vie, la reprise des activités normales et le retour au travail n'étaient rapportés dans aucun des essais. La différence dans le pourcentage de personnes dont l'opération a dû être convertie (de chirurgie mini-invasive) en opération ouverte était imprécise entre le groupe de pression faible (2/269 ; 0,8 %) et le groupe de pression standard (2/287 ; 0,7 %). Ce critère était rapporté dans 10 études. Aucune différence n'était observée dans la durée d'hospitalisation entre les groupes. La durée opératoire était d'environ deux minutes de plus (preuves de qualité très faible) dans le groupe de pression faible que dans le groupe de pression standard. Aujourd'hui, il n'existe pas de preuves pour soutenir le recours au pneumopéritoine à faible pression chez les patients à faible risque chirurgical subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique programmée. La sécurité d'emploi du pneumopéritoine à faible pression doit encore être établie.

Qualité des preuves

Un seul essai portant sur 140 participants était à faible risque de biais (peu de chances d'arriver à des conclusions erronées en raison du plan d'étude). Les 20 autres essais étaient à risque élevé de biais (fortes chances d'arriver à des conclusions erronées en raison du plan d'étude). La qualité globale des preuves était très faible.

Recherches futures

D'autres essais bien conçus sont nécessaires, en particulier chez les patients à haut risque chirurgical subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 12th July, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé