Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Screening women for intimate partner violence in healthcare settings

  1. Angela Taft1,*,
  2. Lorna O'Doherty2,
  3. Kelsey Hegarty2,
  4. Jean Ramsay3,
  5. Leslie Davidson4,
  6. Gene Feder5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group

Published Online: 30 APR 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 5 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007007.pub2


How to Cite

Taft A, O'Doherty L, Hegarty K, Ramsay J, Davidson L, Feder G. Screening women for intimate partner violence in healthcare settings. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD007007. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007007.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    La Trobe University, Mother and Child Health Research, Victoria, Australia

  2. 2

    The University of Melbourne, Department of General Practice, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

  3. 3

    Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary, University of London, Centre for Primary Health Care and Public Health, London, UK

  4. 4

    Columbia University, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY, USA

  5. 5

    University of Bristol, School of Social and Community Medicine, Bristol, UK

*Angela Taft, Mother and Child Health Research, La Trobe University, 215 Franklin Street, Melbourne, Victoria, 3000, Australia. a.taft@latrobe.edu.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 30 APR 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Intimate partner violence (IPV) damages individuals, their children, communities, and the wider economic and social fabric of society. Some governments and professional organisations recommend screening all women for intimate partner violence rather than asking only women with symptoms (case-finding); however, what is the evidence that screening interventions will increase identification, and referral to support agencies, or improve women's subsequent wellbeing and not cause harm?

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of screening for intimate partner violence conducted within healthcare settings for identification, referral to support agencies and health outcomes for women.

Search methods

We searched the following databases in July 2012: CENTRAL (2012, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1948 to September Week June Week 3 2012), EMBASE (1980 to Week 28 2012), MEDLINE In–Process (3 July 2012), DARE (2012, Issue 2), CINAHL (1937 to current), PsycINFO (1806 to June Week 4 2012), Sociological Abstracts (1952 to current) and ASSIA (1987 to October 2010). In addition we searched the following trials registers: metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (to July 2012), and International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), ClinicalTrials.gov, Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register to August 2010. We also searched the reference lists of articles and websites of relevant organisations.

Selection criteria

Randomised or quasi-randomised trials assessing the effectiveness of IPV screening where healthcare professionals screened women face-to-face or were informed of results of screening questionnaires, compared with usual care ( which included screening for other purposes).

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed the risk of bias in the trials and undertook data extraction. For binary outcomes, we calculated a standardised estimation of the risk ratio (RR) and for continuous data, either a mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD). All are presented with a 95% confidence interval (CI).

Main results

We included 11 trials that recruited 13,027 women overall. Six of 10 studies were assessed as being at high risk of bias.

When data from six comparable studies were combined (n = 3564), screening increased identification of victims/survivors (RR 2.33; 95% CI 1.40 to 3.89), particularly in antenatal settings (RR 4.26; 95% CI 1.76 to 10.31).

Only three studies measured referrals to support agencies (n = 1400). There is no evidence that screening increases such referrals, as although referral numbers increased in the screened group, actual numbers were very small and crossed the line of no effect (RR 2.67; 95% CI 0.99 to 7.20).

Only two studies measured women's experience of violence after screening (one at three months, the other at six, 12 and 18 months after screening) and found no significant reduction of abuse.

Only one study measured adverse effects and data from this study suggested that screening may not cause harm. This same study showed a trend towards mental health benefit, but the results did not reach statistical significance.

There was insufficient evidence on which to judge whether screening increases take up of specialist services, and no studies included economic evaluation.

Authors' conclusions

Screening is likely to increase identification rates but rates of referral to support agencies are low and as yet we know little about the proportions of false measurement (negatives or positives). Screening does not appear to cause harm, but only one study examined this outcome. As there is an absence of evidence of long-term benefit for women, there is insufficient evidence to justify universal screening in healthcare settings. Studies comparing screening versus case finding (with or without advocacy or therapeutic interventions) for women's long-term wellbeing would better inform future policies in healthcare settings.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Screening women for intimate partner violence in healthcare settings

Women who have experienced physical, psychological or sexual violence from an intimate partner (for example, husband, boyfriend, ex-husband or ex-boyfriend) can suffer poor physical and mental health, poor pregnancy outcomes and premature death. Their children and families can also suffer. The effects of violence often result in women attending healthcare settings. Some people have argued that healthcare professionals should routinely ask all women attending a healthcare setting whether they have experienced violence from their partner or ex-partner. They argue that this approach (known as universal screening) might encourage women who would not otherwise do so, to disclose abuse, or to recognise their experience as ‘abuse’. In turn, this would enable the healthcare professional to provide immediate support or refer them to specialist help, or both. Some governments and health organisations recommend universal screening for intimate partner violence (IPV). Others argue that such screening should be targeted to high risk groups, such as pregnant women attending antenatal clinics (targeted screening is known as ‘selective screening’).

We carried out this review to find out two things. First, whether there was any evidence that IPV screening increases the number of women identified and the number referred on to specialist services. Second, whether screening results in health benefits to women or causes any harm.

We found 11 studies that assessed the effectiveness of IPV screening where healthcare professionals screened women face-to-face or were informed of results of screening questionnaires, compared with usual care. No study compared the benefit of universal screening versus selective screening. All the studies were conducted in high income countries. The studies looked at screening in hospitals and in community settings. Screening methods included questionnaires (paper and computer based) completed by women themselves or face-to-face screening. No study took into account differences in how much abuse women were experiencing, or whether they were able or ready to take action – something that might affect the likelihood of disclosing abuse. Further, none looked at the sustainability of screening by healthcare professionals.

Screening doubled the likelihood that abused women were identified, but did not increase the numbers referred for specialist help. Both the numbers identified and referred for support were low. Screening did not reduce the level of violence experienced by women or improve women’s health and wellbeing at any time point from three to 18 months after the screening. One study reported no evidence of harm. The remaining ten studies did not address the issue of harmful consequences. We do not know if screening increases take up of specialist services. None of the studies measured how much it costs to deliver screening.

We conclude that there is insufficient evidence to justify universal screening for intimate partner violence in healthcare settings.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Dépistage des femmes victimes de violence exercée par un partenaire masculin intime dans des établissements de soins

Contexte

La violence exercée par un partenaire masculin intime porte gravement atteinte aux individus, à leurs enfants, à la communauté toute entière, et à l'ensemble du tissu social et économique. Certains gouvernements et organismes de santé recommandent un dépistage de la violence exercée par un partenaire masculin intime pour toutes les femmes au lieu de limiter le dépistage uniquement aux femmes présentant des symptômes (recherche des cas) ; cependant, quelles sont les preuves que les interventions de dépistage augmenteront le nombre de cas identifiés, et le nombre de femmes adressées à des services de soutien, ou qu'elles amélioreront le bien-être consécutif des femmes et qu'elles n'entraîneront pas de risques ?

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité du dépistage de la violence exercée par un partenaire masculin intime effectué dans des établissements de soins pour identifier les femmes battues, les adresser à des services de soutien, ainsi que sur les résultats sur la santé des femmes.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

En juillet 2012, nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données suivantes : CENTRAL (2012, numéro 6), MEDLINE (de 1948 jusqu'à la 3ème semaine de septembre et de juin 2012), EMBASE (de 1980 jusqu'à la 28ème semaine de l'année 2012), MEDLINE In–Process (3.07.2012), DARE (2012, numéro 2), CINAHL (de 1937 à aujourd'hui), PsycINFO (de 1806 jusqu'à la 4ème semaine de juin 2012), Sociological Abstracts (de 1952 à aujourd'hui) et ASSIA (de 1987 jusqu'à octobre 2010). En outre, nous avons consulté les registres d'essais suivants : le métaRegistre des essais contrôlés (mREC) (jusqu'à juillet 2012), et le système d’enregistrement international des essais cliniques (International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, (ICTRP)) ClinicalTrials.gov, Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry et le registre ISRCTN (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register) jusqu'à août 2010. Nous avons également cherché dans les références bibliographiques des articles et les sites web des organismes de santé compétents.

Critères de sélection

Des essais randomisés ou quasi-randomisés évaluant l'efficacité du dépistage de la violence exercée par un partenaire masculin intime dans lesquels le personnel médical a dépisté des femmes directement en personne ou était informé des résultats des questionnaires de dépistage, comparativement aux soins habituels (qui incluaient un dépistage mais à d'autres fins).

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont, de manière indépendante, évalué les risques de biais des essais et extrait des données. Pour les résultats binaires, nous avons calculé une estimation standardisée du risque relatif (RR) et pour les variables continues, nous avons calculé soit la différence moyenne (DM) soit la différence moyenne standardisée (DMS). Toutes les mesures sont présentées avec un intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 %.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 11 essais ayant recruté 13 027 femmes globalement. Six des dix études ont été évaluées comme présentant un risque élevé de biais.

Après combinaison des données issues de six études comparables (n = 3564), il en est ressorti que le dépistage a augmenté le nombre de victimes/survivantes identifiées (RR 2,33 ; IC à 95 % 1,40 à 3,89), surtout dans les cliniques prénatales (RR 4,26 ; IC à 95 % 1,76 à 10,31).

Trois études seulement ont mesuré le nombre de femmes adressées à des services de soutien (n = 1400). Il n'y a pas de preuves indiquant que le dépistage augmente le nombre des femmes adressées à des services d'aide car, même si le nombre de ces femmes a augmenté dans le groupe de femmes dépistées, le nombre réel était très faible et dépassait la ligne d'absence d'effet (RR 2,67 ; IC 95 % 0,99 à 7,20).

Deux études seulement ont mesuré la violence subie par les femmes après le dépistage (une à trois mois, l'autre à six mois, 12 mois et 18 mois après le dépistage) et n'ont détecté aucune diminution significative de la violence subie.

Une étude seulement a mesuré les effets indésirables et les données issues de cette étude laissent entendre que le dépistage peut ne pas entraîner de risques. Cette même étude a révélé une tendance vers des bénéfices sur la santé mentale, mais les résultats n'ont pas atteints de signification statistique.

Il n'y avait pas suffisamment de données probantes pour établir si le dépistage augmente le recours à des services d'aide spécialisés, et aucune étude n'a inclus une évaluation économique.

Conclusions des auteurs

Le dépistage est susceptible d'augmenter les taux d'identification de femmes battues mais les taux de femmes adressées à des services de soutien restent faibles et nous en savons toujours très peu sur les proportions de faux résultats (faux négatifs ou faux positifs). Il semble que le dépistage n'entraîne pas de risques, mais une étude seulement a examiné ce critère. Compte tenu de l'absence de preuves d'effets bénéfiques à long terme chez les femmes, il n'y a pas suffisamment de données probantes pour justifier un dépistage universel dans les établissements de soins. Des études comparant le dépistage à la recherche des cas (avec ou sans recommandations ou interventions thérapeutiques) pour le bien-être des femmes à long terme devraient permettre de mieux orienter les futures politiques dans les établissements de soins.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Dépistage des femmes victimes de violence exercée par un partenaire masculin intime dans des établissements de soins

Dépistage des femmes victimes de violence exercée par un partenaire masculin intime dans des établissements de soins

Les femmes ayant subi des violences physiques, psychologiques ou sexuelles exercées par un partenaire masculin intime (par exemple, le mari, le petit copain, l'ex-mari ou l'ex-petit copain) peuvent souffrir d'une mauvaise santé physique et mentale, redouter de mauvais résultats de grossesse et un décès prématuré. Leurs enfants et les familles peuvent aussi en souffrir. Les effets de la violence subie par les femmes impliquent souvent des consultations dans les établissements de soins. Certaines personnes ont plaidé en faveur d'une disposition obligeant le personnel médical à demander systématiquement à toutes les femmes en consultation dans un établissement de soins si elles ont subi des violences exercées par leur partenaire ou ex-partenaire. Ces personnes avancent que cette approche (appelée dépistage universel) pourrait encourager les femmes qui sinon ne le feraient pas, à dénoncer la violence subie, ou à admettre qu'elles subissent des "violences’. À ce stade, cela pourrait permettre au personnel médical de leur apporter un soutien immédiat ou de les adresser à des services d'aide spécialisés, ou les deux. Certains gouvernements et organismes de santé recommandent un dépistage universel de la violence exercée par un partenaire masculin intime. D'autres avancent qu'un tel dépistage devrait cibler les groupes à haut risque, tels que les femmes enceintes en consultation dans les cliniques prénatales (on appelle le dépistage ciblé ‘dépistage sélectif’).

Nous avons effectué cette revue pour déterminer deux points. Premièrement, s'il existait des preuves que le dépistage de la violence exercée par un partenaire masculin intime augmente le nombre de femmes identifiées et le nombre de femmes adressées à des services d'aide spécialisés. Deuxièmement, si le dépistage favorise des bénéfices pour la santé chez les femmes ou s'il entraîne des risques.

Nous avons trouvé 11 études ayant évalué l'efficacité du dépistage de la violence exercée par un partenaire masculin intime dans lesquelles le personnel médical a dépisté des femmes directement en personne ou était informé des résultats des questionnaires de dépistage, comparativement aux soins habituels. Aucune étude n'a comparé les bénéfices d'un dépistage universel à ceux d'un dépistage sélectif. Toutes les études ont été menées dans des pays à haut revenu. Les études ont examiné le dépistage dans les milieux hospitaliers et dans la communauté. Les méthodes de dépistage incluaient des questionnaires (sur papier et au format électronique) complétées du dépistage par les femmes elles-mêmes ou du dépistage des femmes directement en personne. Aucune étude n'a pris en compte les différences dans les diverses formes de violence subies par les femmes battues, ou le fait qu'elles étaient ou non aptes ou prêtes à prendre des mesures, la moindre réaction qui pourrait modifier la probabilité de dénoncer la violence. En outre, aucune n'a examiné la pérennité du dépistage effectué par le personnel médical.

Le dépistage a multiplié par deux la probabilité que les femmes battues soient identifiées, mais n'a pas augmenté le nombre de femmes adressées à des services d'aide spécialisés. Le nombre de femmes identifiées et le nombre de femmes adressées à des services de soutien étaient faibles. Le dépistage n'a pas réduit le niveau de la violence subie par les femmes, ni amélioré la santé et le bien-être des femmes à aucun moment entre 3 et 18 mois après le dépistage. Dans une étude, aucune preuve de risques n'a été rapportée. Les dix autres études n'ont pas abordé la question des conséquences dangereuses. Nous ne savons pas si le dépistage augmente le recours à des services d'aide spécialisés. Aucune des études n'a évalué les coûts de la mise en place du dépistage.

Nous en concluons qu'il n'y a pas suffisamment de données probantes pour justifier le dépistage universel de la violence exercée par un partenaire masculin intime dans des établissements de soins.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 17th May, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.