Intervention Review

Wound infiltration with local anaesthetic agents for laparoscopic cholecystectomy

  1. Sofronis Loizides1,
  2. Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy2,*,
  3. Myura Nagendran3,
  4. Michele Rossi4,
  5. Gian Piero Guerrini5,
  6. Brian R Davidson2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group

Published Online: 12 MAR 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 18 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007049.pub2


How to Cite

Loizides S, Gurusamy KS, Nagendran M, Rossi M, Guerrini GP, Davidson BR. Wound infiltration with local anaesthetic agents for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD007049. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007049.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    St Richard's Hospital Chichester, Department of General Surgery, Chichester, UK

  2. 2

    Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Department of Surgery, London, UK

  3. 3

    Department of Surgery, UCL Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, London, UK

  4. 4

    Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Endoscopia Chirurgica, Firenze, Firenze, Italy

  5. 5

    Ravenna Hospital, Department of Surgery, Ravenna, Italy

*Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy, Department of Surgery, Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Royal Free Hospital, Rowland Hill Street, London, NW3 2PF, UK. k.gurusamy@ucl.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 12 MAR 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

While laparoscopic cholecystectomy is generally considered to be less painful than open surgery, pain is one of the important reasons for delayed discharge after day surgery resulting in overnight stay following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The safety and effectiveness of local anaesthetic wound infiltration in people undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not known.

Objectives

To assess the benefits and harms of local anaesthetic wound infiltration in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy and to identify the best method of local anaesthetic wound infiltration with regards to the type of local anaesthetic, dosage, and time of administration of the local anaesthetic.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded until February 2013 to identify studies of relevance to this review. We included randomised clinical trials for benefit and quasi-randomised and comparative non-randomised studies for treatment-related harms.

Selection criteria

Only randomised clinical trials (irrespective of language, blinding, or publication status) comparing local anaesthetic wound infiltration versus placebo, no intervention, or inactive control during laparoscopic cholecystectomy, trials comparing different local anaesthetic agents for local anaesthetic wound infiltration, and trials comparing the different times of local anaesthetic wound infiltration were considered for the review.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors collected the data independently. We analysed the data with both fixed-effect and random-effects meta-analysis models using RevMan. For each outcome, we calculated the risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI).

Main results

Twenty-six trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria of the review. All the 26 trials except one trial of 30 participants were at high risk of bias. Nineteen of the trials with 1263 randomised participants provided data for this review. Ten of the 19 trials compared local anaesthetic wound infiltration versus inactive control. One of the 19 trials compared local anaesthetic wound infiltration with two inactive controls, normal saline and no intervention. Two of the 19 trials had four arms comparing local anaesthetic wound infiltration with inactive controls in the presence and absence of co-interventions to decrease pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Four of the 19 trials had three or more arms that could be included for the comparison of local anaesthetic wound infiltration versus inactive control and different methods of local anaesthetic wound infiltration. The remaining two trials compared different methods of local anaesthetic wound infiltration.

Most trials included only low anaesthetic risk people undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Seventeen trials randomised a total of 1095 participants to local anaesthetic wound infiltration (587 participants) versus no local anaesthetic wound infiltration (508 participants). Various anaesthetic agents were used but bupivacaine was the commonest local anaesthetic used. There was no mortality in either group in the seven trials that reported mortality (0/280 (0%) in local anaesthetic infiltration group versus 0/259 (0%) in control group). The effect of local anaesthetic on the proportion of people who developed serious adverse events was imprecise and compatible with increase or no difference in serious adverse events (seven trials; 539 participants; 2/280 (0.8%) in local anaesthetic group versus 1/259 (0.4%) in control; RR 2.00; 95% CI 0.19 to 21.59; very low quality evidence). None of the serious adverse events were related to local anaesthetic wound infiltration. None of the trials reported patient quality of life. The proportion of participants who were discharged as day surgery patients was higher in the local anaesthetic infiltration group than in the no local anaesthetic infiltration group (one trial; 97 participants; 33/50 (66.0%) in the local anaesthetic group versus 20/47 (42.6%) in the control group; RR 1.55; 95% CI 1.05 to 2.28; very low quality evidence). The effect of local anaesthetic on the length of hospital stay was compatible with a decrease, increase, or no difference in the length of hospital stay between the two groups (four trials; 327 participants; MD -0.26 days; 95% CI -0.67 to 0.16; very low quality evidence). The pain scores as measured by the visual analogue scale (0 to 10 cm) were lower in the local anaesthetic infiltration group than the control group at 4 to 8 hours (13 trials; 806 participants; MD -1.33 cm on the VAS; 95% CI -1.54 to -1.12; very low quality evidence) and 9 to 24 hours (12 trials; 756 participants; MD -0.36 cm on the VAS; 95% CI -0.53 to -0.20; very low quality evidence). The effect of local anaesthetic on the time taken to return to normal activity between the two groups was imprecise and compatible with a decrease, increase, or no difference in the time taken to return to normal activity (two trials; 195 participants; MD 0.14 days; 95% CI -0.59 to 0.87; very low quality evidence). None of the trials reported on return to work.

Four trials randomised a total of 149 participants to local anaesthetic wound infiltration prior to skin incision (74 participants) versus local anaesthetic wound infiltration at the end of surgery (75 participants). Two trials randomised a total of 176 participants to four different local anaesthetics (bupivacaine, levobupivacaine, ropivacaine, neosaxitoxin). Although there were differences between the groups in some outcomes the changes were not consistent. There was no evidence to support the preference of one local anaesthetic over another or to prefer administration of local anaesthetic at a specific time compared with another.

Authors' conclusions

Serious adverse events were rare in studies evaluating local anaesthetic wound infiltration (very low quality evidence). There is very low quality evidence that infiltration reduces pain in low anaesthetic risk people undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. However, the clinical importance of this reduction in pain is likely to be small. Further randomised clinical trials at low risk of systematic and random errors are necessary. Such trials should include important clinical outcomes such as quality of life and time to return to work in their assessment.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Wound infiltration with local anaesthetic agents for laparoscopic cholecystectomy (local anaesthetic administration into the surgical wound in people undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy)

Background
About 10% to 15% of the adult western population have gallstones. Between 1% and 4% become symptomatic each year. Removal of the gallbladder (cholecystectomy) is the mainstay treatment for symptomatic gallstones. More than half a million cholecystectomies are performed per year in the United States alone. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (removal of the gallbladder through a keyhole, also known as a port) is now the preferred method of cholecystectomy. While laparoscopic cholecystectomy is generally considered to be less painful than open surgery, pain is one the major reasons for delayed hospital discharge after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Administration of local anaesthetics (drugs that numb part of the body, similar to the ones used by the dentist to prevent people from feeling pain) into the surgical wound (local anaesthetic wound infiltration) may be an effective way of decreasing pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. However, the benefits and harms of local anaesthetic wound infiltration is not known. We sought to answer these questions by reviewing the medical literature and obtaining information from randomised clinical trials on the benefits related to the treatment. When conducted well, such studies provide the most accurate information on the best treatment. We also considered comparative non-randomised studies for treatment-related harms. Two authors searched the literature until February 2013 and obtained information from the studies thereby minimising errors.

Study characteristics
We identified 19 randomised clinical trials in this review. Most participants in the trials were low anaesthetic risk people undergoing planned laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Key results
A total of 1095 participants were randomised to local anaesthetic wound infiltration (587 participants) or no local anaesthetic wound infiltration (508 participants) in 17 trials. The choice of whether the participants received local anaesthetic agents (or not) was determined by a method similar to the toss of a coin so that the treatments were compared in groups of patients who were as similar as possible. There were no deaths in either group in the seven trials (539 participants) that reported deaths. The difference in serious complications between the groups was imprecise. There were no local anaesthetic-related complications in nearly 450 participants who received local anaesthetic wound infiltration in the different trials that reported complications. None of the trials reported quality of life or the time taken to return to work. The proportion of participants who were discharged as day surgery patients was higher in the local anaesthetic group than in the control group in the only trial that reported this information. The difference in the length of hospital stay or the time taken to return to normal activity was imprecise. Pain was lower in the participants who received intra-abdominal local anaesthetic administration compared with those in the control groups at four to eight hours and at nine to 24 hours, as measured by the visual analogue scale (a chart which rates the amount of pain on a scale of 1 to 10). In the comparisons of different methods of local anaesthetic infiltration, there were differences between the groups in some outcomes but the changes were not consistent. There is, therefore, no evidence to prefer any particular drug or method of administering local anaesthetics. Serious adverse events were rare in studies evaluating local anaesthetic wound infiltration. There is very low quality evidence that infiltration reduces pain in low anaesthetic risk people undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. However, the clinical importance of this reduction in pain is likely to be small.

Quality of evidence
Most of the trials were at high risk of bias, that is there is a possibility of arriving at wrong conclusions by overestimating the benefits or underestimating the harms of one method over another because of the way a study was conducted. The overall quality of evidence was very low.

Future research
Further trials are necessary. Such trials should include outcomes such as quality of life, hospital stay, the time taken to return to normal activity, and the time taken to return to work, which are important for the person undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy and the people who provide funds for the treatment.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Infiltration de la plaie par des agents anesthésiques locaux pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique

Contexte

Bien que la cholécystectomie laparoscopique soit généralement considérée comme moins douloureuse que la chirurgie ouverte, la douleur est l'un des principaux motifs d’une sortie retardée après la chirurgie ambulatoire entraînant une hospitalisation d'une nuit suite à une cholécystectomie laparoscopique. L'innocuité et l'efficacité d'une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local chez les personnes subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique ne sont pas connues.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets bénéfiques et délétères d'une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local chez les patients subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique et identifier la meilleure méthode d'une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local concernant le type d'anesthésique local, de dosage et de durée d'administration de l'anesthésique local.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE et Science Citation Index Expanded jusqu'en février 2013 afin d’identifier des études pertinentes pour cette revue. Nous avons inclus des essais cliniques randomisés pour observer le bénéfice et des études quasi-randomisés et comparatives non randomisées pour observer les préjudices liés au traitement.

Critères de sélection

Seuls les essais cliniques randomisés (indépendamment de la langue, de la mise en aveugle, ou du statut de publication) comparant une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local par rapport à un placebo, à l'absence d'intervention ou à un contrôle inactif pendant la cholécystectomie laparoscopique, les essais comparant différents agents anesthésiques locaux pour une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local et les essais comparant les différentes périodes d'infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local, ont été pris en compte pour la revue.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont recueilli les données de façon indépendante. Nous avons analysé les données à l'aide des modèles de méta-analyses à effets fixes et à effets aléatoires en utilisant RevMan. Pour chaque critère de jugement, nous avons calculé le risque relatif (RR) ou la différence moyenne (DM) avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 %.

Résultats principaux

Vingt-six essais remplissaient les critères d'inclusion de la revue. Tous les 26 essais, à l'exception d'un essai de 30 participants, étaient à risque de biais élevé. Dix-neuf des essais avec 1 263 participants randomisés ont fourni des données pour cette revue. Dix des 19 essais ont comparé une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local par rapport à un groupe témoin inactif. Un des 19 essais comparait une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local à deux groupes témoins inactifs, à une solution saline normale et à l'absence d'intervention. Deux des 19 essais possédaient quatre groupes comparant une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local à un groupe témoin inactif en la présence et l'absence de co-interventions pour réduire la douleur après une cholécystectomie laparoscopique. Quatre des 19 essais possédaient trois groupes ou plus susceptibles d'être inclus pour la comparaison d'une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local par rapport à un groupe témoin inactif et différentes méthodes d’infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local. Les deux essais restants comparaient différentes méthodes d’infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local.

La plupart des essais incluaient uniquement les personnes à faible risque anesthésique subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique élective. Dix-sept essais ont randomisé un total de 1 095 participants subissant une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local (587 participants) par rapport à l'absence d’infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local (508 participants). Différents agents anesthésiques étaient utilisés, mais la bupivacaïne était l’anesthésique local le plus couramment utilisé. Aucune mortalité n’a été déclarée dans aucun des groupes des sept essais qui avaient rendu compte de la mortalité (0 / 280 (0 %) dans le groupe d’infiltration avec un anesthésique local par rapport à 0 / 259 (0 %) dans le groupe témoin). L'effet d'un anesthésique local, sur la proportion de personnes ayant développé des effets indésirables graves, était imprécis et compatible avec une différence accrue ou non d’effets indésirables graves (sept essais ; 539 participants ; 2 / 280 (0,8 %) dans le groupe d’anesthésique local par rapport à 1 / 259 (0,4 %) dans le groupe témoin; RR 2,00 ; IC à 95 % 0,19 à 21,59 ; preuves de très faible qualité). Aucun des effets indésirables graves n’était lié à une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local. Aucun des essais n'a rapporté la qualité de vie des patients. La proportion de participants qui sont sortis de l’hôpital après une chirurgie ambulatoire était plus élevée dans le groupe d'infiltration avec un anesthésique local que dans le groupe sans infiltration avec un anesthésique local (un essai ; 97 participants ; 33 / 50 (66,0 %) dans le groupe de l'anesthésique local par rapport à 20 / 47 (42,6 %) dans le groupe témoin; RR 1,55 ; IC à 95 % 1,05 à 2,28 ; preuves de très faible qualité). L'effet d'un anesthésique local sur la durée du séjour à l'hôpital était compatible avec une diminution, une augmentation, ou aucune différence dans la durée d'hospitalisation entre les deux groupes (quatre essais ; 327 participants ; DM -0,26 jours ; IC à 95 % -0,67 à 0,16 ; preuves de très faible qualité). Les scores de douleur comme mesurés par l'échelle visuelle analogique (0 à 10 cm) étaient plus faibles dans le groupe d'infiltration avec un anesthésique local que dans le groupe témoin de 4 à 8 heures (13 essais ; 806 participants ; DM -1,33 cm sur l'EVA ; IC à 95 % -1,54 à -1,12 ; preuves de très faible qualité) et de 9 à 24 heures (12 essais ; 756 participants ; DM -0,36 cm sur l'EVA ; IC à 95 % -0,53 à -0,20 ; preuves de très faible qualité). L'effet d'un anesthésique local sur le temps nécessaire à la reprise des activités normales entre les deux groupes était imprécis et compatible avec une diminution, une augmentation, ou aucune différence dans le temps nécessaire à la reprise des activités normales (deux essais ; 195 participants ; DM 0,14 jours ; IC à 95 % -0,59 à 0,87 ; preuves de très faible qualité). Aucun des essais ne rapportait sur le retour au travail.

Quatre essais randomisaient un total de 149 participants pour une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local avant l’incision cutanée (74 participants) par rapport à une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local à la fin de la chirurgie (75 participants). Deux essais randomisaient un total de 176 participants pour quatre différents anesthésiques locaux (bupivacaïne, lévobupivacaïne, ropivacaïne neosaxitoxin). Bien qu'il y ait des différences entre les groupes dans certains critères de jugement, les changements n'étaient pas cohérents. Il n'y avait aucune preuve permettant de recommander un anesthésique local par rapport à un autre ou l'administration d'un anesthésique local à un moment précis par rapport à un autre.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les effets indésirables graves étaient rares dans les études évaluant une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local (preuves de très faible qualité). Des preuves de très faible qualité montrent que l'infiltration réduit la douleur chez les personnes à faible risque anesthésique subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique élective. Cependant, l'importance clinique de cette réduction de la douleur est probablement faible. D'autres essais cliniques randomisés à faible risque d'erreurs systématiques et aléatoires sont nécessaires. De tels essais devraient inclure dans leur évaluation des résultats cliniques importants, tels que la qualité de vie et le délai de retour au travail.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Infiltration de la plaie par des agents anesthésiques locaux pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique (administration d’un anesthésique local dans la plaie chirurgicale chez les personnes subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique)

Contexte
Environ 10 % à 15 % de la population adulte occidentale souffre de calculs biliaires. Entre 1 et 4 % deviennent symptomatiques chaque année. L'ablation de la vésicule biliaire (cholécystectomie) est le pilier du traitement pour les calculs biliaires symptomatiques. Plus d'un demi-million de cholécystectomies sont effectuées chaque année uniquement aux États-Unis. La cholécystectomie laparoscopique (ablation de la vésicule biliaire à l’aide de grosses aiguilles, également connue sous le nom de trocarts) est aujourd'hui la méthode de cholécystectomie préférée. Tandis que la cholécystectomie laparoscopique est généralement considérée comme étant moins douloureuse que la chirurgie ouverte, la douleur est l'une des principales raisons expliquant une sortie d'hôpital retardée après une cholécystectomie laparoscopique. L'administration d'anesthésiques locaux (médicaments qui insensibilisent une partie du corps, similaires à ceux utilisés par le dentiste pour que les personnes ne ressentent pas la douleur) dans la plaie chirurgicale (infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local) pourrait être un moyen efficace pour réduire la douleur après une cholécystectomie laparoscopique. Cependant, les bénéfices et les inconvénients d’une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local ne sont pas connus. Nous avons cherché à répondre à ces questions en passant en revue la littérature médicale et en obtenant des informations issues d'essais cliniques randomisés sur les bénéfices liés au traitement. Lorsqu'elles sont menées correctement, de telles études fournissent des informations très précises sur le meilleur traitement. Nous avons également pris en compte les études comparatives non randomisées pour le traitement lié à la nocivité. Deux auteurs ont effectué des recherches dans la littérature jusqu'en février 2013 et obtenu des informations issues d’études afin de minimiser les erreurs.

Les caractéristiques de l'étude
Dans cette revue, nous avons identifié 19 essais cliniques randomisés. La plupart des participants dans les essais subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique programmée étaient à faible risque anesthésique.

Résultats principaux
Dans 17 essais, 1 095 participants ont été randomisés pour une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local (587 participants) ou sans infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local (508 participants). Une méthode similaire à un tirage au sort déterminait si le participant recevait un agent anesthésique local (ou non), de sorte que les traitements étaient comparés parmi les groupes de patients qui étaient aussi similaires que possible. Aucun décès n'était rapporté dans aucun des groupes des sept essais (539 participants) qui rapportaient la mortalité. La différence entre les groupes relative auxcomplications graves était imprécise. Il n'y avait pas de complication relative à l’anesthésique local chez presque 450 participants ayant reçu une infiltration de la plaie par anesthésique local dans les différents essais qui avaient rendu compte de complications. Aucun des essais n'a rapporté la qualité de vie ou le temps nécessaire pour le retour au travail. La proportion de participants qui quittaient l’hôpital après une chirurgie ambulatoire était plus élevée dans le groupe d'anesthésique local que dans le groupe témoin dans le seul essai ayant rendu compte de cette information. La différence dans la durée de séjour à l'hôpital ou le temps nécessaire pour le retour à une activité normale était imprécise. La douleur était plus faible chez les participants ayant reçu une administration intra-abdominale d’anesthésique local par rapport à ceux des groupes témoins de 4 à 8 heures et de 9 à 24 heures, telle que mesurée par l'échelle visuelle analogue (une représentation graphique qui évalue la quantité de la douleur sur une échelle de 1 à 10). Lors des comparaisons des différentes méthodes d'infiltration d'anesthésique local, il y avait des différences entre les groupes dans certains critères de jugement, mais les changements n'étaient pas cohérents. Par conséquent, il n’existe aucune preuve permettant de préférer un médicament particulier ou une méthode particulière pour administrer les anesthésiques locaux. Les effets indésirables graves étaient rares dans les études évaluant les infiltrations de la plaie avec un anesthésique local. Des preuves de très faible qualité montrent que l'infiltration réduit la douleur chez les patients à faible risque anesthésique subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique élective. Cependant, l'importance clinique de cette réduction de la douleur est probablement faible.

Qualité des preuves
La plupart des essais étaient à risque de biais élevé, ce qui peut conduire à des conclusions erronées en surestimant les bénéfices ou en sous-estimant les inconvénients d'une méthode par rapport à une autre en raison de la manière dont une étude a été réalisée. La qualité globale des preuves était très faible.

Les recherches futures
D'autres essais sont nécessaires. De tels essais devraient inclure des critères de jugement tels que la qualité de vie, le séjour à l'hôpital, le temps nécessaire à la reprise des activités normales et le temps nécessaire pour le retour au travail, qui sont importants pour la personne subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique et les personnes qui fournissent des fonds pour le traitement.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 22nd June, 2014