Intervention Review

Effects of sevoflurane versus other general anaesthesia on emergence agitation in children

  1. David Costi1,*,
  2. Allan M Cyna2,
  3. Samira Ahmed1,
  4. Kate Stephens2,
  5. Penny Strickland1,
  6. James Ellwood1,
  7. Jessica N Larsson1,
  8. Cheryl Chooi2,
  9. Laura L Burgoyne1,
  10. Philippa Middleton3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Anaesthesia Group

Published Online: 12 SEP 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 19 JAN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007084.pub2


How to Cite

Costi D, Cyna AM, Ahmed S, Stephens K, Strickland P, Ellwood J, Larsson JN, Chooi C, Burgoyne LL, Middleton P. Effects of sevoflurane versus other general anaesthesia on emergence agitation in children. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 9. Art. No.: CD007084. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007084.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Women's and Children's Hospital, Department of Paediatric Anaesthesia, Adelaide, Australia

  2. 2

    Women's and Children's Hospital, Department of Women's Anaesthesia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

  3. 3

    The University of Adelaide, ARCH: Australian Research Centre for Health of Women and Babies, Robinson Research Institute, Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

*David Costi, Department of Paediatric Anaesthesia, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, SA 5006, Australia. david.costi@health.sa.gov.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 12 SEP 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Sevoflurane is an inhaled volatile anaesthetic that is widely used in paediatric anaesthetic practice. Since its introduction, postoperative behavioural disturbance known as emergence agitation (EA) or emergence delirium (ED) has been recognized as a problem that may occur during recovery from sevoflurane anaesthesia. For the purpose of this systematic review, EA has been used to describe this clinical entity. A child with EA may be restless, may cause self-injury or may disrupt the dressing, surgical site or indwelling devices, leading to the potential for parents to be dissatisfied with their child's anaesthetic. To prevent such outcomes, the child may require pharmacological or physical restraint. Sevoflurane may be a major contributing factor in the development of EA. Therefore, an evidence-based understanding of the risk/benefit profile regarding sevoflurane compared with other general anaesthetic agents and adjuncts would facilitate its rational and optimal use.

Objectives

To compare sevoflurane with other general anaesthetic (GA) agents, with or without pharmacological or non-pharmacological adjuncts, with regard to risk of EA in children during emergence from anaesthesia. The primary outcome was risk of EA; secondary outcome was agitation score.

Search methods

We searched the following databases from the date of inception to 19 January 2013: CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (EBSCOhost), Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews (EBMR) and the Web of Science, as well as the reference lists of other relevant articles and online trial registers.

Selection criteria

We included all randomized (or quasi-randomized) controlled trials investigating children < 18 years of age presenting for general anaesthesia with or without surgical intervention. We included any study in which a sevoflurane anaesthetic was compared with any other GA, and any study in which researchers investigated adjuncts (pharmacological or non-pharmacological) to sevoflurane anaesthesia compared with no adjunct or placebo.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently searched the databases, decided on inclusion eligibility of publications, ascertained study quality and extracted data. They then resolved differences between their results by discussion. Data were entered into RevMan 5.2 for analyses and presentation. Comparisons of the risk of EA were presented as risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Sevoflurane is treated as the control anaesthesia in this review. Sensitivity analyses were performed as appropriate, to exclude studies with a high risk of bias and to investigate heterogeneity.

Main results

We included 158 studies involving 14,045 children. Interventions to prevent EA fell into two broad groups. First, alternative GA compared with sevoflurane anaesthesia (69 studies), and second, use of an adjunct with sevoflurane anaesthesia versus sevoflurane without an adjunct (100 studies). The overall risk of bias in included studies was low. The overall Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group (GRADE) assessment of the quality of the evidence was moderate to high. A wide range of EA scales were used, as were different levels of cutoff, to determine the presence or absence of EA. Some studies involved children receiving potentially inadequate or no analgesia intraoperatively during painful procedures.

Halothane (RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.63, 3534 participants, high quality of evidence) and propofol anaesthesia were associated with a lower risk of EA than sevoflurane anaesthesia. Propofol was effective when used throughout anaesthesia (RR 0.35, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.51, 1098 participants, high quality of evidence) and when used only during the maintenance phase of anaesthesia after sevoflurane induction (RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.76, 738 participants, high quality of evidence). No clear evidence was found of an effect on risk of EA of desflurane (RR 1.46, 95% CI 0.92 to 2.31, 408 participants, moderate quality of evidence) or isoflurane (RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.46 to 1.23, 379 participants, moderate quality of evidence) versus sevoflurane.

Compared with no adjunct, effective adjuncts for reducing the risk of EA during sevoflurane anaesthesia included dexmedetomidine (RR 0.37, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.47, 851 participants, high quality of evidence), clonidine (RR 0.45, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.66, 739 participants, high quality of evidence), opioids, in particular fentanyl (RR 0.37, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.50, 1247 participants, high quality of evidence) and a bolus of propofol (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.89, 394 participants, moderate quality of evidence), ketamine (RR 0.30, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.69, 231 participants, moderate quality of evidence) or midazolam (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.81, 116 participants, moderate quality of evidence) at the end of anaesthesia. Midazolam oral premedication (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.12, 370 participants, moderate quality of evidence) and parental presence at emergence (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.60, 180 participants, moderate quality of evidence) did not reduce the risk of EA.

One or more factors designated as high risk of bias were noted in less than 10% of the included studies. Sensitivity analyses of these studies showed no clinically relevant changes in the risk of EA. Heterogeneity was significant with respect to these comparisons: halothane; clonidine; fentanyl; midazolam premedication; propofol 1 mg/kg bolus at end; and ketamine 0.25 mg/kg bolus at end of anaesthesia. With investigation of heterogeneity, the only clinically relevant changes to findings were seen in the context of potential pain, namely, the setting of adenoidectomy/adenotonsillectomy (propofol bolus; midazolam premedication) and the absence of a regional block (clonidine).

Authors' conclusions

Propofol, halothane, alpha-2 agonists (dexmedetomidine, clonidine), opioids (e.g. fentanyl) and ketamine reduce the risk of EA compared with sevoflurane anaesthesia, whereas no clear evidence shows an effect for desflurane, isoflurane, midazolam premedication and parental presence at emergence. Therefore anaesthetists can consider several effective strategies to reduce the risk of EA in their clinical practice. Future studies should ensure adequate analgesia in the control group, for which pain may be a contributing or confounding factor in the diagnosis of EA. Regardless of the EA scale used, it would be helpful for study authors to report the risk of EA, so that this might be included in future meta-analyses. Researchers should also consider combining effective interventions as a multi-modal approach to further reduce the risk of EA.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Agitation in children after sevoflurane anaesthesia

Review question

We reviewed the evidence looking at how often children wake up agitated after a sevoflurane general anaesthetic compared with other general anaesthetics. We also reviewed evidence looking at the effects of other treatments (e.g. a medication given during the anaesthetic, the presence of a parent when a child wakes up) on how often children wake up agitated after receiving a sevoflurane anaesthetic.

Background

Sevoflurane is a commonly used anaesthetic gas for children because it can be breathed in by face mask and works very quickly in getting children off to sleep. Sevoflurane is given continuously during an operation to keep the child asleep, and it is turned off when it is time for the child to wake up. It is very common for children, especially preschool children, to wake up restless, agitated, delirious or thrashing around after receiving a sevoflurane anaesthetic. We call this "emergence agitation." It can occur even when no pain is present and usually resolves within 30 minutes of waking up. Children with emergence agitation may injure themselves, bump the operation wound and pull out drips or wound drains. Emergence agitation can be distressing for parents and caregivers. We wanted to discover whether the rate of emergence agitation is lowered when different anaesthetics are used. We also wanted to know whether treatments can be given to reduce the rate of emergence agitation when sevoflurane is used.

Study characteristics

The evidence is current to January 2013. We found a total of 158 studies involving 14,045 children. A total of 69 studies compared a sevoflurane anaesthetic with a different anaesthetic, and 100 studies looked at treatments to reduce the rate of emergence agitation with a sevoflurane anaesthetic. Most of these treatments were medications that were compared with a dummy treatment (placebo) or with no medication. We reran the search in April 2014 and will address identified studies of interest when we update the review.

Key results

The medications propofol, halothane, alpha-2 agonists (dexmedetomidine, clonidine), opioids (e.g. fentanyl) and ketamine reduce the rate of emergence agitation, whereas no clear evidence of an effect was found for the anaesthetic gases desflurane and isoflurane, the premedication midazolam and parental presence when a child wakes up from anaesthesia.

Quality of the evidence

Overall the evidence is of moderate to high quality. Researchers should consider combining effective interventions to see whether the risk of EA can be reduced further.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Effets du sévoflurane par rapport aux autres anesthésiques généraux sur l'agitation au réveil chez l'enfant

Contexte

Le sévoflurane est un anesthésique volatil pour inhalation qui est largement utilisé en anesthésie pédiatrique. Depuis son introduction, il s'est avéré que le réveil après une anesthésie au sévoflurane pouvait s'accompagner de troubles du comportement post-opératoires connus sous le nom d'agitation au réveil ou délire d'émergence. Aux fins de cette revue systématique, nous utilisons le terme d'agitation au réveil pour décrire cette entité clinique. Un enfant agité au réveil peut se blesser ou déranger son pansement, le site opéré ou les dispositifs à demeure, de sorte que les parents peuvent être mécontents de l'anesthésie de leur enfant. Afin d'éviter de tels incidents, il peut être nécessaire de restreindre les mouvements de l'enfant par des moyens pharmacologiques ou physiques. Le sévoflurane joue peut-être un rôle majeur dans l'apparition de l'agitation au réveil. Il importe donc, en se basant sur les preuves, de comprendre le rapport bénéfice/risque du sévoflurane par rapport à d'autres anesthésiques généraux et d'identifier les compléments qui pourraient faciliter son utilisation rationnelle et optimale.

Objectifs

Comparer le sévoflurane avec d'autres agents d'anesthésie générale, avec ou sans compléments pharmacologiques ou non pharmacologiques, en termes de risque d'agitation au réveil post-anesthésie chez les enfants. Le critère d'évaluation principal était le risque d'agitation au réveil ; le critère d'évaluation secondaire était le score d'agitation.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données suivantes, de leur date de création au 19 janvier 2013 : CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Index cumulé de la littérature en soins infirmiers et apparentés (CINAHL) (EBSCOhost), Revues de médecine basée sur la preuve (EBMR) et Web of Science, ainsi que dans les listes de références d'autres articles pertinents et dans les registres d'essais en ligne.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus tous les essais contrôlés randomisés (ou quasi randomisés) portant sur des enfants âgés de moins de 18 ans subissant une anesthésie générale avec ou sans intervention chirurgicale. Nous avons inclus toutes les études dans lesquelles le sévoflurane était comparé à un autre anesthésique général, quel qu'il soit, et toutes les études dans laquelle les chercheurs ont étudié des compléments (pharmacologiques ou non pharmacologiques) à l'anesthésie au sévoflurane par rapport à l'absence de complément ou à un placebo.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont consulté indépendamment les bases de données, décidé de l'inclusion des publications, évalué la qualité des études et extrait les données. Ils ont résolu les désaccords entre leurs résultats par la discussion. Les données ont été saisies dans RevMan 5.2 pour analyse et présentation. Les comparaisons du risque d'agitation au réveil ont été présentées sous forme de risques relatifs (RR) avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 %. Le sévoflurane est traité comme l'anesthésie de contrôle dans cette revue. Des analyses de sensibilité ont été effectuées, le cas échéant, afin d'exclure les études ayant un risque élevé de biais et d'étudier l'hétérogénéité.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons inclus 158 études portant sur 14 045 enfants. Les interventions visant à prévenir l'agitation au réveil se divisent en deux grands groupes : d'une part, des comparaisons d'autres anesthésiques généraux avec le sévoflurane (69 études), et d'autre part, des comparaisons d'un complément à l'anesthésie au sévoflurane avec le sévoflurane sans complément (100 études). Le risque de biais des études incluses était globalement faible. L'évaluation selon la méthode GRADE (Groupe de travail de recommandation, d'évaluation et de développement) de la qualité des preuves a donné une notation de modérée à élevée. Les échelles d'agitation au réveil étaient très variables, de même que les niveaux de distinction déterminant la présence ou l'absence d'agitation. Certaines études portaient sur des enfants ayant reçu une analgésie potentiellement inadéquate ou pas d'analgésie en cours d'intervention pour des procédures douloureuses.

Les anesthésies à l'halothane (RR 0,51, IC à 95 % de 0,41 à 0,63, 3 534 participants, preuves de qualité élevée) et au propofol ont été associées à un risque plus faible d'agitation au réveil que le sévoflurane. Le propofol était efficace lorsqu'il était utilisé pendant toute la durée de l'anesthésie (RR 0,35, IC à 95 % de 0,25 à 0,51, 1 098 participants, preuves de qualité élevée) ou uniquement pendant la phase d'entretien de l'anesthésie, après induction au sévoflurane (RR 0,59, IC à 95 % de 0,46 à 0,76, 738 participants, preuves de qualité élevée). Aucune preuve claire n'a été trouvée d'un effet sur le risque d'agitation au réveil avec le desflurane (RR 1,46, IC à 95 % de 0,92 à 2,31, 408 participants, preuves de qualité modérée) ou l'isoflurane (RR 0,76, IC à 95 % de 0,46 à 1,23, 379 participants, preuves de qualité modérée) par rapport au sévoflurane.

Par rapport à l'absence de complément, les compléments efficaces pour réduire le risque d'agitation au réveil après une anesthésie au sévoflurane incluent la dexmédétomidine (RR 0,37, IC à 95 % de 0,29 à 0,47, 851 participants, preuves de qualité élevée), la clonidine (RR 0,45, IC à 95 % de 0,31 à 0,66, 739 participants, preuves de qualité élevée), les opiacés, en particulier le fentanyl (RR 0,37, IC à 95 % de 0,27 à 0,50, 1 247 participants, preuves de qualité élevée) et un bolus de propofol (RR 0,58, IC à 95 % de 0,38 à 0,89, 394 participants, preuves de qualité modérée), de kétamine (RR 0,30, IC à 95 % de 0,13 à 0,69, 231 participants, preuves de qualité modérée) ou de midazolam (RR 0,57, IC à 95 % de 0,41 à 0,81, 116 participants, preuves de qualité modérée) à la fin de l'anesthésie. La prémédication orale avec le midazolam (RR 0,81, IC à 95 % de 0,59 à 1,12, 370 participants, preuves de qualité modérée) et la présence des parents au réveil (RR 0,91, IC à 95 % de 0,51 à 1,60, 180 participants, preuves de qualité modérée) ne réduisent pas le risque d'agitation au réveil.

Moins de 10 % des études incluses comportaient un ou plusieurs facteurs désignés comme étant à risque élevé de biais. Les analyses de sensibilité de ces études n'ont montré aucune modification cliniquement significative du risque d'agitation au réveil. L'hétérogénéité était significative dans les comparaisons suivantes : halothane, clonidine, fentanyl, prémédication au midazolam, bolus final de propofol à 1 mg/kg, bolus de kétamine à 0,25 mg/kg en fin d'anesthésie. En ce qui concerne l'hétérogénéité, les seuls changements cliniquement pertinents pour nos résultats sont ressortis dans le contexte de la douleur potentielle, à savoir, d'adénoïdectomie ou adéno-amygdalectomie (bolus de propofol, prémédication au midazolam), et en l'absence de bloc locorégional (clonidine).

Conclusions des auteurs

Le propofol, l'halothane, les alpha-2 agonistes (dexmédétomidine, clonidine), les opiacés (par ex. le fentanyl) et la kétamine réduisent le risque d'agitation au réveil par rapport à l'anesthésie au sévoflurane, alors qu'aucune preuve claire ne démontre un effet du desflurane, de l'isoflurane, de la prémédication au midazolam ou de la présence des parents au réveil. Par conséquent, les anesthésistes peuvent envisager plusieurs stratégies efficaces pour réduire le risque d'agitation au réveil dans leur pratique clinique. Les études futures devront assurer une analgésie suffisante dans le groupe témoin, dans lequel la douleur peut être un facteur contributif ou de confusion dans le diagnostic de l'agitation au réveil. Quelle que soit l'échelle d'agitation au réveil utilisée, il serait utile que les auteurs des études rapportent le risque d'agitation, afin de pouvoir inclure celui-ci dans les futures méta-analyses. Les chercheurs devraient aussi envisager de combiner les interventions efficaces dans le cadre d'une approche multi-modale visant à réduire encore le risque d'agitation au réveil.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

L'agitation chez les enfants après une anesthésie au sévoflurane

Question de la revue

Nous avons examiné les données concernant la fréquence de l'agitation au réveil chez les enfants après une anesthésie générale au sévoflurane par rapport aux autres anesthésiques généraux. Nous avons également examiné les preuves des effets d'autres traitements (par exemple d'un médicament donné au cours de l'anesthésie, de la présence d'un parent quand l'enfant se réveille) sur la fréquence de l'agitation au réveil des enfants après une anesthésie au sévoflurane.

Contexte

Le sévoflurane est un gaz anesthésique couramment utilisé en pédiatrie car il peut être aspiré par masque et endort très rapidement les enfants. Il est administré en continu pendant l'opération afin de garder l'enfant endormi, et arrêté quand il est temps de le réveiller. Il est très fréquent que les enfants, en particulier les plus jeunes, se réveillent dans un état d'anxiété, d'agitation, de délire ou de convulsions après avoir reçu une anesthésie au sévoflurane. Cet état est appelé « agitation au réveil ». Il peut se produire même en l'absence de douleur et s'atténue habituellement dans les 30 minutes suivant le réveil. Les enfants agités au sortir de l'anesthésie peuvent se blesser, heurter leur plaie chirurgicale et arracher leurs perfusions ou leurs drains. L'agitation au réveil peut être difficile à vivre pour les parents et les soignants. Nous avons voulu savoir si le taux d'agitation au réveil était abaissé lorsque d'autres anesthésiques étaient utilisés. Nous voulions aussi savoir si des traitements peuvent être donnés pour réduire le taux d'agitation après une anesthésie par le sévoflurane.

Caractéristiques des études

Les preuves sont à jour à la date de janvier 2013. Nous avons trouvé un total de 158 études incluant 14 045 enfants. Au total, 69 études ont comparé le sévoflurane avec un autre anesthésique et 100 études ont examiné des traitements destinés à réduire le taux d'agitation au réveil après une anesthésie au sévoflurane. La plupart de ces traitements étaient des médicaments, qui ont été comparés à un traitement fictif (placebo) ou à l'absence de médicament. Nous avons réitéré la recherche en avril 2014 et aborderons les études d'intérêt identifiées lorsque nous actualiserons la revue.

Principaux résultats

Le propofol, l'halothane, les alpha-2 agonistes (dexmédétomidine, clonidine), les opiacés (par ex. le fentanyl) et la kétamine réduisent le taux d'agitation au réveil, tandis que nous n'avons pas trouvé de preuve claire d'un effet pour les gaz anesthésiques desflurane et isoflurane, la prémédication avec le midazolam et la présence des parents lorsque l'enfant se réveille de l'anesthésie.

Qualité des preuves

Dans l'ensemble, les preuves sont de qualité modérée à élevée. Il serait utile que les chercheurs combinent les interventions efficaces pour voir si le risque d'agitation au réveil peut être encore réduit.

Notes de traduction

Traduction réalisée par le Centre Cochrane Français