This is not the most recent version of the article. View current version (3 DEC 2014)

Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Immediate-release versus controlled-release carbamazepine in the treatment of epilepsy

  1. Graham Powell1,*,
  2. Matthew Saunders2,
  3. Anthony G Marson2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Epilepsy Group

Published Online: 3 FEB 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 5 SEP 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007124.pub3


How to Cite

Powell G, Saunders M, Marson AG. Immediate-release versus controlled-release carbamazepine in the treatment of epilepsy. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD007124. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007124.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    The Walton Centre for Neurology & Neurosurgery NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK

  2. 2

    Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Liverpool, Merseyside, UK

*Graham Powell, The Walton Centre for Neurology & Neurosurgery NHS Foundation Trust, Lower Lane, Fazakerley, Liverpool, L9 7LJ, UK. g.a.powell@doctors.org.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 3 FEB 2014

SEARCH

This is not the most recent version of the article. View current version (03 DEC 2014)

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Epilepsy is defined as the tendency to spontaneous, excessive neuronal discharge manifesting as seizures. It is a common disorder with an incidence of 50 per 100,000 per year and a prevalence of 0.5% to 1% (Hauser 1993) in the developed world.

Carbamazepine (CBZ) is a widely used antiepileptic drug that is associated with a number of troublesome adverse events including dizziness, double vision and unsteadiness. These often occur during peaks in plasma concentration. The occurrence of such adverse events may limit the daily dose that can be tolerated and reduce the chances of seizure control for patients requiring higher doses (Vojvodic 2002). A controlled-release formulation of carbamazepine delivers the same dose over a longer period of time when compared to a standard formulation, thereby reducing post-dose peaks and potentially reducing adverse events associated with peak plasma levels.

Objectives

To determine the efficacy of immediate-release CBZ (IR CBZ) versus controlled-release CBZ (CR CBZ) in patients diagnosed with epilepsy. The following hypotheses were tested.
(1) For newly diagnosed patients commencing CBZ, how do immediate-release and controlled-release formulations compare for efficacy and tolerability?
(2) For patients on established treatment with immediate-release CBZ but experiencing unacceptable adverse events, what is the effect on seizure control and tolerability of a switch to a controlled-release formulation versus remaining on the immediate-release formulation?

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialised Register (5 September 2013), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 8, 2013) in The Cochrane Library and MEDLINE (1946 to 5 September 2013).

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials comparing IR CBZ to CR CBZ in patients commencing monotherapy and patients presently treated with IR CBZ but experiencing unacceptable adverse events.

Primary outcome measures include seizure frequency, incidence of adverse events, proportion with treatment failure and quality of life measures.

Data collection and analysis

The methodological quality of each study was assessed with respect to study design, type of control, method and the concealment of allocation, blinding and completeness of follow up, and the presence of blinding for assessment of non-fatal outcomes. We did not make use of an overall quality score.

Two review authors (GP, MS) independently extracted the data and recorded relevant information on a standardised data extraction form. Results were assessed for inclusion.

The heterogeneity of the included trials resulted in only a narrative, descriptive analysis being possible for both the categorical and time-to-event data.

Main results

Ten trials fulfilled the criteria for inclusion in this review. One trial included patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy and nine included patients on treatment with IR CBZ.

Eight trials reported heterogeneous measures of seizure frequency with conflicting results. A statistically significant difference was observed in only one trial, with patients prescribed CR CBZ experiencing fewer seizures than patients prescribed IR CBZ.

Nine trials reported measures of adverse events. There was a trend in favour of CR CBZ with four trials reporting a statistically significant reduction in adverse events compared to IR CBZ. A further two trials reported fewer adverse events with CR CBZ but the reduction was not statistically significant. One trial found no difference, with a further trial reporting increased adverse events in the CR CBZ group although not statistically significant.

Authors' conclusions

At present, data from trials do not confirm or refute an advantage for CR CBZ over IR CBZ for seizure frequency or adverse events in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

For trials involving epilepsy patients already prescribed IR CBZ, no conclusions can be drawn concerning the superiority of CR CBZ with respect to seizure frequency.

There is a trend for CR CBZ to be associated with fewer adverse events when compared to IR CBZ. A change to CR CBZ may therefore be a worthwhile strategy in patients with acceptable seizure control on IR CBZ but experiencing unacceptable adverse events. The included trials were of small size, poor methodological quality and possessed a high risk of bias, limiting the validity of this conclusion.

Randomised controlled trials comparing CR CBZ to IR CBZ and using clinically relevant outcomes are required to inform the choice of CBZ preparation for patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Immediate-release versus controlled-release carbamazepine in the treatment of epilepsy

Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that is often treated with carbamazepine. With treatment, the number of seizures are often reduced but many people experience side effects. When carbamazepine is taken and it is absorbed into the body quickly there is a sharp rise in blood levels. These 'peaks' may be associated with side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness and lack of coordination. A form of carbamazepine that releases the medication into the body slowly may reduce these 'peaks' in blood levels, reducing the occurrence of side effects.

This review compared studies assessing the differences between a 'fast-release' carbamazepine and a 'slow-release' carbamazepine. Just one of 10 studies found a significant difference between the two carbamazepine types in the number of seizures experienced, with patients prescribed the slow-release carbamazepine experiencing fewer seizures than patients prescribed the fast-release drug. Patients taking 'slow-release' carbamazepine tended to experience fewer side effects. It must be stressed that there are few studies assessing the differences between these two carbamazepine types and more studies are needed before we can make a definitive conclusion.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Carbamazépine à libération immédiate et à libération contrôlée dans le traitement de l'épilepsie

Contexte

L’épilepsie se définit par une tendance à une décharge neuronale excessive spontanée se manifestant sous forme de crises. C’est un trouble courant dont l'incidence est de 50 pour 100 000 cas par an avec une prévalence de 0,5 % à 1 % (Hauser 1993) dans les pays développés.

La carbamazépine (CBZ) est un antiépileptique largement employé qui est associé à plusieurs événements indésirables gênants, notamment les vertiges, la diplopie et l'ataxie. Ces événements surviennent souvent au moment des pics de concentration plasmatique. La survenue de ces événements indésirables peut limiter la dose quotidienne tolérée et réduire les chances de contrôler les crises chez les patients nécessitant des doses plus élevées (Vojvodic 2002). Une galénique à libération contrôlée de carbamazépine fournit la même dose sur une période de temps plus longue par comparaison avec une galénique standard, réduisant ainsi les pics post-dose et pouvant diminuer les événements indésirables associés aux pics plasmatiques.

Objectifs

Déterminer l'efficacité de la CBZ à libération immédiate (CBZ LI) par rapport à la CBZ à libération contrôlée (CBZ LC) chez les patients épileptiques diagnostiqués. Les hypothèses suivantes ont été testées.
(1) Pour les patients nouvellement diagnostiqués entamant la CBZ, les galéniques à libération immédiate et à libération contrôlée sont-elles comparables sur le plan de l'efficacité et de la tolérabilité ?
(2) Pour les patients sous traitement établi avec la CBZ à libération immédiate présentant des événements indésirables inacceptables, quel sera l'effet sur le contrôle des crises et sur la tolérabilité d'un passage à une galénique à libération contrôlée versus la poursuite du traitement avec la galénique à libération immédiate ?

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur l'épilepsie (5 septembre 2013), le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (numéro 8, 2013) dans la Bibliothèque Cochrane et MEDLINE (de 1946 au 5 septembre 2013).

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés comparant la CBZ LI à la CBZ LC chez les patients entamant une monothérapie et chez les patients actuellement traités par la CBZ LI ayant eu des événements indésirables inacceptables.

Les critères de jugement principaux incluent la fréquence des crises, l’incidence des événements indésirables, la proportion d’échec thérapeutique et la qualité de vie.

Recueil et analyse des données

La qualité méthodologique de chaque étude a été évaluée concernant le plan d'étude, le type de contrôles, la méthode et l'assignation secrète, la mise en aveugle et la complétude du suivi ainsi que l’existence d’une évaluation à l’aveugle des critères de jugement autres que le décès. Nous n’avons pas utilisé de score de qualité global.

Deux auteurs de la revue (GP, MS) ont de manière indépendante extrait les données et enregistré les informations pertinentes sur un formulaire d’extraction des données standardisé. Les résultats ont été évalués pour l’inclusion.

En raison de l’hétérogénéité des essais inclus, seule une analyse narrative et descriptive a été possible tant pour les données catégorielles que pour les données sur le délai jusqu’à l’événement.

Résultats Principaux

Dix essais remplissaient les critères d’inclusion dans cette revue. Un seul essai incluait des patients dont le diagnostic d’épilepsie venait d’être posé et neuf essais regroupaient des patients actuellement sous CBZ LI.

Huit essais ont fourni des mesures hétérogènes de la fréquence des crises avec des résultats contradictoires. Une différence statistiquement significative a été observée dans un seul essai, les patients auxquels avait été prescrite la CBZ LC ayant moins de crises que les patients sous CBZ LI.

Neuf essais ont fourni des mesures des événements indésirables. Une tendance s’est dégagée en faveur de la CBZ LC, quatre essais mentionnant en effet une diminution statistiquement significative des événements indésirables par rapport à la CBZ LI. Deux autres essais ont signalé un nombre moins élevé d’événements indésirables avec la CBZ LC, mais cette diminution n’était pas statistiquement significative. Un essai n'a fait état d’aucune différence, un autre essai notant une augmentation du nombre d'événements indésirables dans le groupe de la CBZ LC, bien que non statistiquement significative.

Conclusions des auteurs

Actuellement, les données des essais ne confirment ni ne réfutent l’avantage de la CBZ LC par rapport à la CBZ LI pour ce qui est de la fréquence des crises ou des événements indésirables chez les patients dont l’épilepsie vient d’être diagnostiquée.

Pour ce qui est des essais regroupant des patients épileptiques prenant déjà de la CBZ LI, aucune conclusion relative à la supériorité de la CBZ LC pour ce qui est de la fréquence des crises ne peut être tirée.

La CBZ LC a tendance à être associée à un nombre moindre d’événements indésirables par comparaison avec la CBZ LI. Le passage à la CBZ LC peut par conséquent se révéler une stratégie payante pour les patients chez lesquels la CBZ LI offre un contrôle acceptable des crises mais occasionne des événements indésirables inacceptables. Les essais inclus ont été réalisés à petite échelle et avaient une qualité méthodologique insuffisante ainsi qu'un risque de biais élevé, ce qui limite la validité de cette conclusion.

Des essais contrôlés randomisés comparant la CBZ LC à la CBZ LI et utilisant des critères de jugement cliniquement pertinents doivent être menés pour éclairer le choix de la galénique de CBZ à utiliser pour les patients dont l'épilepsie vient d'être diagnostiquée.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Carbamazépine à libération immédiate et à libération contrôlée dans le traitement de l'épilepsie

La carbamazépine à libération immédiate et à libération contrôlée dans le traitement de l'épilepsie

L’épilepsie est un trouble neurologique courant qui est souvent traité avec la carbamazépine. Grâce au traitement, le nombre de crises est souvent réduit, mais de nombreuses personnes présentent des effets secondaires. Lorsque la carbamazépine est prise et est absorbée rapidement par l’organisme, une élévation soudaine des taux sanguins est constatée. Ces « pics » peuvent être associés à des effets secondaires tels que des vertiges, une somnolence et un manque de coordination. Une forme de carbamazépine libérant lentement le médicament dans le corps peut réduire ces pics des taux sanguins et ainsi diminuer la survenue des effets secondaires.

Cette revue a comparé des études évaluant les différences entre la carbamazépine « à libération rapide » et la carbamazépine « à libération lente ». Seule une étude sur 10 a fait état d'une différence significative entre les deux types de carbamazépine au niveau du nombre de crises, les patients sous carbamazépine à libération lente ayant moins de crises que ceux prenant le médicament à libération rapide. Les patients sous carbamazépine à libération lente avaient tendance à avoir moins d’effets secondaires. Il convient de souligner que le nombre d’études évaluant les différences entre ces deux types de carbamazépine est peu élevé et que des études supplémentaires doivent être réalisées pour que nous puissions parvenir à une conclusion définitive.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 22nd June, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé