Intervention Protocol

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Pelvic floor muscle training versus other active treatments for urinary incontinence in women

  1. Sabine Lins1,*,
  2. Daniela Hayder-Beichel1,
  3. Frank Kunath2,
  4. Rufus Cartwright3,
  5. Edith Motschall4,
  6. Gerd Antes1,
  7. Gerta Rücker4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Incontinence Group

Published Online: 2 JUN 2014

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007173.pub3


How to Cite

Lins S, Hayder-Beichel D, Kunath F, Cartwright R, Motschall E, Antes G, Rücker G. Pelvic floor muscle training versus other active treatments for urinary incontinence in women (Protocol). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 6. Art. No.: CD007173. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007173.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Medical Biometry and Medical Informatics, University Medical Center Freiburg, German Cochrane Centre, Freiburg, Germany

  2. 2

    University of Erlangen, Department of Urology, Erlangen, Germany

  3. 3

    Imperial College London, Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, and Department of Urogynaecology, London, UK

  4. 4

    Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Center for Medical Biometry and Medical Informatics, Freiburg, Germany

*Sabine Lins, German Cochrane Centre, Institute of Medical Biometry and Medical Informatics, University Medical Center Freiburg, Berliner Allee 29, Freiburg, 79110, Germany. lins@cochrane.de.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Amended to reflect a change in scope (see 'What's new')
  2. Published Online: 2 JUN 2014

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Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows:

To determine the effects of pelvic floor muscle training against other single treatment modalities in the management of female urinary (stress, mixed, urgency) incontinence.

We will make the following comparisons:

  1. PFMT versus lifestyle intervention, based on structured and supervised programme;
  2. PFMT versus weighted vaginal cones;
  3. PFMT versus mechanical intervention (e.g. pessary);
  4. PFMT versus behavioural and psychological therapy (e.g. bladder training with the characteristic scheduled voiding regimen);
  5. PFMT versus non-invasive electrical or magnetic stimulation (we will exclude trials that involve the use of implantable electrodes);
  6. PFMT versus drug therapy;
  7. PFMT versus surgery;
  8. PFMT versus any other stand-alone active treatment as reported by individual trials.