Intervention Review

Screening and subsequent management for gestational diabetes for improving maternal and infant health

  1. Joanna Tieu1,*,
  2. Andrew J McPhee2,
  3. Caroline A Crowther1,3,
  4. Philippa Middleton1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group

Published Online: 11 FEB 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 1 DEC 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007222.pub3


How to Cite

Tieu J, McPhee AJ, Crowther CA, Middleton P. Screening and subsequent management for gestational diabetes for improving maternal and infant health. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD007222. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007222.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    The University of Adelaide, ARCH: Australian Research Centre for Health of Women and Babies, The Robinson Institute, Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

  2. 2

    Women's and Children's Hospital, Neonatal Medicine, North Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

  3. 3

    The University of Auckland, Liggins Institute, Auckland, New Zealand

*Joanna Tieu, ARCH: Australian Research Centre for Health of Women and Babies, The Robinson Institute, Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Adelaide, Women's and Children's Hospital, 1st floor, Queen Victoria Building, 72 King William Road, Adelaide, South Australia, 5006, Australia. joanna.tieu@gmail.com. joanna.tieu@mh.org.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 11 FEB 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a form of diabetes that occurs in pregnancy. Although GDM usually resolves following birth, it is associated with significant morbidities for mother and baby both perinatally and in the long term. There is strong evidence to support treatment for GDM. However, there is little consensus on whether or not screening for GDM will improve maternal and infant health and if so, the most appropriate protocol to follow.

Objectives

To assess the effects of different methods of screening for GDM and maternal and infant outcomes.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (1 December 2013).

Selection criteria

Randomised and quasi-randomised trials evaluating the effects of different methods of screening for GDM.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently conducted data extraction and quality assessment. We resolved disagreements through discussion or through a third author.

Main results

We included four trials involving 3972 women in the review. One quasi-randomised trial compared risk factor screening with universal or routine screening by 50 g oral glucose challenge testing. Women in the universal screening group were more likely to be diagnosed with GDM (one trial, 3152 women, risk ratio (RR) 0.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.26 to 0.75). This trial did not report on the other primary outcomes of the review (positive screen for GDM, mode of birth, large-for-gestational age, or macrosomia). Considering secondary outcomes, infants of mothers in the risk factor screening group were born marginally earlier than infants of mothers in the routine screening group (one trial, 3152 women, mean difference (MD) -0.15 weeks, 95% CI -0.27 to -0.03).

The remaining three trials evaluated different methods of administering a 50 g glucose load. Two small trials compared glucose monomer with glucose polymer testing, with one of these trials including a candy bar group. One trial compared a glucose solution with food. No differences in diagnosis of GDM were found between each comparison. However, in one trial significantly more women in the glucose monomer group screened positive for GDM than women in the candy bar group (80 women, RR 3.49, 95% CI 1.05 to 11.57). The three trials did not report on the primary review outcomes of mode of birth, large-for-gestational age or macrosomia. Overall, women drinking the glucose monomer experienced fewer side effects from testing than women drinking the glucose polymer (two trials, 151 women, RR 2.80, 95% CI 1.10 to 7.13). However, we observed substantial heterogeneity between the trials for this result (I² = 61%).

Authors' conclusions

There was insufficient evidence to determine if screening for gestational diabetes, or what types of screening, can improve maternal and infant health outcomes.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Screening for gestational diabetes and subsequent management for improving maternal and infant health

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a form of diabetes that can develop during pregnancy. Having GDM increases the risk of complications during the rest of the pregnancy for the mother and her baby. Women with GDM are more likely to develop pre-eclampsia (high blood pressure and protein in the urine) and require a caesarean section. For the baby, potential problems include the baby growing larger than it normally would, causing difficulties with birth. The baby can also have low blood sugar levels after birth. Although GDM usually resolves following birth, both mother and child are at risk of developing type II diabetes in the future. There is strong evidence that treating GDM is beneficial and improves health outcomes.

It may therefore help if pregnant women are screened to identify as many as possible of those who do have GDM before they have symptoms, such as excessive thirst or urination, or fatigue. The two main approaches to screening are 'universal' where all women undergo a screening test for GDM; and 'selective' where only those women at 'high risk' are screened. The main risk factors are maternal age, high body mass index, family history and cigarette smoking. The different screening strategies used around the world to identify women with GDM include identifying women based on their risk factors, a blood sugar test one hour after a 50 g glucose drink, and random blood sugar measurements. It is however unclear whether screening for GDM leads to better health outcomes and if so, which screening strategy is the most appropriate.

This review included four trials involving 3972 women and their babies, and found that there is little high-quality evidence on the effects of screening for GDM on health outcomes for mothers and their babies. One trial compared risk factor screening with universal screening, and three trials evaluated different methods of administering a 50 g glucose load (the glucose load is used during the screening test). In one trial, women who were in the universal screening group were more likely to be diagnosed with GDM compared with women in the high-risk screening group. However, this trial was not of high quality. Few other differences between groups were shown in any of the trials. Further research is required to see which recommendations for screening practices for GDM are most appropriate.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Dépistage et prise en charge du diabète gestationnel pour une meilleure santé de la mère et de l'enfant

Contexte

Le diabète sucré gestationnel (DSG) est une forme de diabète qui survient pendant la grossesse. Bien que le DSG disparaisse généralement après l'accouchement, il est associé à des morbidités importantes pour la mère et l'enfant, tant dans la période périnatale qu'à long terme. Il existe des données probantes en faveur du traitement du DSG. Toutefois, les avis divergent quant à savoir si le dépistage du DSG améliore ou non la santé de la mère et de l'enfant et, le cas échéant, quel est le meilleur protocole à suivre.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des différentes méthodes de dépistage du DSG et les résultats cliniques pour la mère et l'enfant.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur la grossesse et l'accouchement (1 décembre 2013).

Critères de sélection

Essais randomisés et quasi randomisés évaluant les effets des différentes méthodes de dépistage du DSG.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont de façon indépendante extrait les données et évalué leur qualité. Les désaccords ont été résolus par discussion ou par l'intervention d'un troisième auteur.

Résultats Principaux

Quatre essais, impliquant 3 972 femmes, ont été inclus dans la revue. Un essai quasi randomisé a comparé le dépistage selon les facteurs de risque au dépistage universel ou de routine par test de charge glycémique après ingestion de 50 g de glucose. Les femmes du groupe de dépistage universel étaient plus susceptibles de recevoir un diagnostic de DSG (un essai, 3 152 femmes, risque relatif (RR) 0,44, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % de 0,26 à 0,75). Cet essai ne rendait pas compte des autres critères de jugement principaux de la revue (dépistage positif du DSG, mode d'accouchement, grande taille pour l'âge gestationnel ou macrosomie). Sur les critères de jugement secondaires, les nourrissons des mères dans le groupe de dépistage selon les facteurs de risque sont nés légèrement plus tôt que ceux dont la mère était dans le groupe de dépistage de routine (un essai, 3 152 femmes, différence moyenne (DM) -0,15 semaine, IC à 95 % -0,27 à -0,03).

Les trois autres essais ont évalué différentes méthodes d'administration d'une charge de 50 g de glucose. Deux petits essais ont comparé les tests avec un monomère de glucose à un polymère de glucose, l'un d'entre eux comportant un groupe ingérant une barre chocolatée. Un essai a comparé une solution glucosée à des aliments. Aucune différence de diagnostic de DSG n'a été observée entre chaque comparaison. Toutefois, dans un essai, significativement plus de femmes dans le groupe de monomère de glucose ont eu un dépistage positif de DSG que les femmes dans le groupe de barre chocolatée (80 femmes, RR 3,49, IC à 95 % 1,05 à 11,57). Les trois essais ne rendaient pas compte des critères de jugement principaux de cette revue, à savoir le mode d'accouchement, la grande taille pour l'âge gestationnel ou la macrosomie. Dans l'ensemble, les femmes ayant bu le monomère de glucose ont présenté moins d'effets secondaires dus au test que celles ayant bu le polymère de glucose (deux essais, 151 femmes, RR 2,80, IC à 95 % 1,10 à 7,13). Toutefois, nous avons observé une hétérogénéité substantielle entre les essais pour ce résultat (I² = 61 %).

Conclusions des auteurs

Les données étaient insuffisantes pour déterminer si le dépistage du diabète gestationnel, et quels types de dépistage le cas échéant, peuvent améliorer les résultats cliniques de la mère et de l'enfant.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Dépistage et prise en charge du diabète gestationnel pour une meilleure santé de la mère et de l'enfant

Le dépistage et la prise en charge du diabète gestationnel pour une meilleure santé de la mère et de l'enfant

Le diabète sucré gestationnel (DSG) est une forme de diabète qui peut survenir pendant la grossesse. Le DSG augmente le risque de complications pendant le reste de la grossesse pour la mère et son bébé. Les femmes atteintes de DSG sont plus susceptibles de développer une pré-éclampsie (hypertension et protéine dans les urines) et de nécessiter une césarienne. Les complications potentielles pour l'enfant sont notamment une croissance anormalement importante, ce qui peut entraîner des difficultés lors de l'accouchement. Le bébé peut également présenter une hypoglycémie après la naissance. Bien que le DSG disparaisse généralement après l'accouchement, la mère comme l'enfant risquent de développer un diabète de type II par la suite. Tout porte à croire que le traitement du DSG apporte des bénéfices et améliore les résultats cliniques.

Par conséquent, il peut être utile de dépister les femmes enceintes afin d'identifier autant que possible celles atteintes de DSG avant qu'elles n'en développent les symptômes, tels qu'une soif ou une miction excessive ou la fatigue. Les deux approches principales de dépistage sont l'approche « universelle », lorsque toutes les femmes subissent un test de dépistage du DSG, et l'approche « sélective », lorsque seules les femmes à « risque élevé » sont dépistées. Les principaux facteurs de risque sont l'âge de la mère, un indice de masse corporelle élevé, les antécédents familiaux et le tabagisme. Les différentes stratégies de dépistage utilisées dans le monde pour identifier les femmes atteintes de DSG incluent l'identification des femmes d'après leurs facteurs de risque, un test de glycémie une heure après l'absorption d'une boisson contenant 50 g de glucose, et des mesures de glycémie aléatoires. Toutefois, on ne sait pas avec certitude si le dépistage du DSG améliore les résultats cliniques et, le cas échéant, quelle stratégie de dépistage est la plus efficace.

Cette revue a inclus quatre essais portant sur 3 972 femmes et leurs bébés, et a révélé qu'il existe peu de données de qualité élevée sur les effets du dépistage du DSG sur les résultats cliniques pour la mère et l'enfant. Un essai comparait le dépistage selon les facteurs de risque au dépistage universel, et trois essais évaluaient différentes méthodes d'administration d'une charge de 50 g de glucose (utilisée pendant le test de dépistage). Dans un essai, les femmes qui étaient dans le groupe de dépistage universel étaient plus susceptibles de recevoir un diagnostic de DSG, en comparaison avec les femmes dans le groupe de dépistage à haut risque. Cependant, cet essai n'était pas de qualité élevée. Peu d'autres différences entre les groupes ont été observées dans l'ensemble des essais. D'autres recherches sont nécessaires pour établir des recommandations quant aux meilleures pratiques de dépistage du diabète sucré gestationnel.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 22nd June, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé