Intervention Review

Effects of communicating DNA-based disease risk estimates on risk-reducing behaviours

  1. Theresa M Marteau1,*,
  2. David P French2,
  3. Simon J Griffin3,
  4. A T Prevost4,
  5. Stephen Sutton5,
  6. Clare Watkinson3,
  7. Sophie Attwood1,
  8. Gareth J Hollands1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Consumers and Communication Group

Published Online: 6 OCT 2010

Assessed as up-to-date: 6 SEP 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007275.pub2

How to Cite

Marteau TM, French DP, Griffin SJ, Prevost AT, Sutton S, Watkinson C, Attwood S, Hollands GJ. Effects of communicating DNA-based disease risk estimates on risk-reducing behaviours. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2010, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD007275. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007275.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    King's College London, Health Psychology Section, London, UK

  2. 2

    Coventry University, Applied Research Centre in Health and Lifestyle Interventions, Coventry, UK

  3. 3

    Institute of Metabolic Science, MRC Epidemiology Unit, Cambridge, UK

  4. 4

    King's College London, Department of Primary Care and Public Health Sciences, London, UK

  5. 5

    University of Cambridge, Institute of Public Health, Cambridge, UK

*Theresa M Marteau, Health Psychology Section, King's College London, 5th Floor Bermondsey Wing, Guy's Campus, London, SE1 9RT, UK. theresa.marteau@kcl.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 6 OCT 2010

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Background

There are high expectations regarding the potential for the communication of DNA-based disease risk estimates to motivate behaviour change.

Objectives

To assess the effects of communicating DNA-based disease risk estimates on risk-reducing behaviours and motivation to undertake such behaviours.

Search methods

We searched the following databases using keywords and medical subject headings: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 4 2010), MEDLINE (1950 to April 2010), EMBASE (1980 to April 2010), PsycINFO (1985 to April 2010) using OVID SP, and CINAHL (EBSCO) (1982 to April 2010). We also searched reference lists, conducted forward citation searches of potentially eligible articles and contacted authors of relevant studies for suggestions. There were no language restrictions. Unpublished or in press articles were eligible for inclusion.

Selection criteria

Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials involving adults (aged 18 years and over) in which one group received actual (clinical studies) or imagined (analogue studies) personalised DNA-based disease risk estimates for diseases for which the risk could plausibly be reduced by behavioural change. Eligible studies had to include a primary outcome measure of risk-reducing behaviour or motivation (e.g. intention) to alter such behaviour.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors searched for studies and independently extracted data. We assessed risk of bias according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. For continuous outcome measures, we report effect sizes as standardised mean differences (SMDs). For dichotomous outcome measures, we report effect sizes as odds ratios (ORs). We obtained pooled effect sizes with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using the random effects model applied on the scale of standardised differences and log odds ratios.

Main results

We examined 5384 abstracts and identified 21 studies as potentially eligible. Following a full text analysis, we included 14 papers reporting results of 7 clinical studies (2 papers report on the same trial) and 6 analogue studies.

Of the seven clinical studies, five assessed smoking cessation. Meta-analyses revealed no statistically significant effects on either short-term (less than 6 months) smoking cessation (OR 1.35, 95% CI 0.76 to 2.39, P = 0.31, n = 3 studies) or cessation after six months (OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.64 to 1.78, P = 0.80, n = 4 studies). Two clinical studies assessed diet and found effects that significantly favoured DNA-based risk estimates (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.17 to 4.27, P = 0.01). No statistically significant effects were found in the two studies assessing physical activity (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.80, P = 0.92) or the one study assessing medication or vitamin use aimed at reducing disease risks (OR 1.26, 95% CI 0.58 to 2.72, P = 0.56). 

For the six non-clinical analogue studies, meta-analysis revealed a statistically significant effect of DNA-based risk on intention to change behaviour (SMD 0.16, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.29, P = 0.01).

There was no evidence that communicating DNA-based disease risk estimates had any unintended adverse effects. Two studies that assessed fear arousal immediately after the presentation of risk information did, however, report greater fear arousal in the DNA-based disease risk estimate groups compared to comparison groups.

The quality of included studies was generally poor. None of the clinical or analogue studies were considered to have a low risk of bias, due to either a lack of clarity in reporting, or where details were reported, evidence of a failure to sufficiently safeguard against the risk of bias.

Authors' conclusions

Mindful of the weak evidence based on a small number of studies of limited quality, the results of this review suggest that communicating DNA-based disease risk estimates has little or no effect on smoking and physical activity. It may have a small effect on self-reported diet and on intentions to change behaviour. Claims that receiving DNA-based test results motivates people to change their behaviour are not supported by evidence. Larger and better-quality RCTs are needed.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Does communicating DNA-based risk estimates motivate people to change their behaviour?

Tests can now be conducted in which DNA is analysed to estimate the chance of developing diseases such as heart disease or lung cancer in smokers.  It was thought that risk estimates derived from these genetic tests may motivate people to change their behaviour in order to reduce the identified risks. In the current review, we assessed the effect of communicating disease risk estimates from genetic tests on risk-reducing behaviours and motivation to undertake such behaviours.

A systematic search located 14 papers reporting the results of 13 eligible studies: seven clinical studies and six analogue studies (studies in which participants are given hypothetical scenarios asking them to imagine receiving genetic test based disease risk estimates).

Five clinical studies assessed smoking cessation, with statistical combination of the results revealing no statistically significant effects on smoking cessation in either the short-term (< six months) or long term (> six months). Two clinical studies assessed dietary behaviour and showed that communicating genetic test-based risk estimates did change people's behaviour.The two studies assessing physical activity and the one study assessing medication or vitamin use aimed at reducing disease risks did not show that communicating DNA-based disease risk estimates had an effect on behaviour.

For the six analogue studies, statistical combination of the results revealed a statistically significant effect of genetic test based disease risk estimates on intention to change behaviour only. There was no evidence of any unintended detrimental effects on motivation or mood.

In summary, the limited amount and quality of evidence currently available suggests that communicating genetic test based disease risk estimates may have little or no effect on behaviour, but may have a small effect on intentions to change behaviour. Larger and better quality trials are needed.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antecedentes

Efectos de la comunicación de las estimaciones del riesgo de enfermedad basado en el ADN sobre conductas para reducir riesgos

Hay grandes expectativas con respecto al potencial que tiene la comunicación de las estimaciones del riesgo de enfermedad basado en el ADN de motivar el cambio en la conducta.

Objetivos

Evaluar los efectos de la comunicación de las estimaciones del riesgo de enfermedad basado en el ADN en las conductas para reducir riesgos y la motivación para incurrir en dichas conductas.

Estrategia de búsqueda

Se realizaron búsquedas en las siguientes bases de datos mediante términos de búsqueda y títulos de búsqueda médicos: Registro Cochrane Central de Ensayos Controlados (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, número 4, 2010), MEDLINE (1950 hasta abril 2010), EMBASE (1980 hasta abril 2010), PsycINFO (1985 hasta abril 2010), utilizando OVID SP y CINAHL (EBSCO) (1982 hasta abril 2010). También se realizaron búsquedas en las listas de referencias, se realizaron búsquedas de referencias de los artículos potencialmente elegibles y se estableció contacto con los autores de estudios relevantes para obtener sugerencias. No hubo restricciones de idioma. Los artículos no publicados o en prensa fueron elegibles para la inclusión.

Criterios de selección

Ensayos controlados aleatorios o cuasialeatorios con adultos (18 años o más) en los que un grupo recibió estimaciones del riesgo de enfermedad de enfermedad basado en el ADN personalizadas reales (estudios clínicos) o imaginarias (estudios análogos) para enfermedades cuyo riesgo podría reducirse posiblemente con un cambio en la conducta. Los estudios elegibles debían incluir una medida de resultado primaria de conductas para reducir riesgos o motivación (es decir, intención) para modificar dichas conductas.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Dos autores de la revisión buscaron los estudios y extrajeron los datos de forma independiente. Se evaluó el riesgo de sesgo según el Manual Cochrane para Revisiones Sistemáticas de Intervenciones. Para obtener las medidas de resultado continuas, se informan los tamaños del efecto como diferencias de medias estandarizadas (DME). Para obtener las medidas de resultado dicotómicas, se informa el tamaño del efecto como odds ratios (OR). Se obtuvieron los tamaños del efecto agrupado con intervalos de confianza (IC) del 95%, con el modelo de efectos aleatorios aplicado en la escala de diferencias estandarizadas y los odds ratios logarítmicos.

Resultados principales

Se examinaron 5384 resúmenes y se identificaron 21 estudios como potencialmente eligibles. Después de un análisis total del texto, se incluyeron 14 artículos que informaron los resultados de siete estudios clínicos (dos informes de artículos sobre el mismo ensayo) y seis estudios análogos.

De los siete estudios clínicos, cinco evaluaron el abandono del hábito de fumar. Los metanálisis no revelaron ningún efecto estadísticamente significativo en el abandono del hábito de fumar a corto plazo (menos de seis meses) (OR 1,35; IC del 95%: 0,76 a 2,39; p = 0,31; n = tres estudios) o abandono del hábito de fumar después de seis meses (OR 1,07; IC del 95%: 0,64 a 1,78; p = 0,80; n = cuatro estudios). Dos estudios clínicos evaluaron la dieta y encontraron efectos que favorecieron significativamente las estimaciones del riesgo basado en el ADN (OR 2,24; IC del 95%: 1,17 a 4,27; p = 0,01). No se encontraron efectos estadísticamente significativos en los dos estudios que evaluaron la actividad física (OR 1,03; IC del 95%: 0,59 a 1,80; p = 0,92) o el único estudio que evaluó el uso de medicamentos o vitaminas para reducir los riesgos de enfermedad (OR 1,26; IC del 95%: 0,58 a 2,72; p = 0,56).

Para los seis estudios análogos no clínicos, el metanálisis reveló un efecto estadísticamente significativo del riesgo basado en el ADN en la intención de cambiar las conductas (DME 0,16; IC del 95%: 0,04 a 0,29; p = 0,01).

No hubo pruebas acerca de que la comunicación de las estimaciones del riesgo de enfermedad basado en el ADN tuviera efectos adversos. Sin embargo, dos estudios que evaluaron la sensación de temor inmediatamente después de presentar la información del riesgo informaron una sensación más intensa del temor en los grupos de estimaciones del riesgo de enfermedad basado en el ADN en comparación con los grupos de comparación.

En general, la calidad de los estudios incluidos fue deficiente. Se consideró que ninguno de los estudios clínicos o análogos tuvo un bajo riesgo de sesgo, debido a la falta de claridad en el informe o, cuando se aportaron detalles, pruebas de que no se pudo proteger satisfactoriamente contra el riesgo de sesgo.

Conclusiones de los autores

Si se tienen en cuenta las pruebas débiles basadas en un número pequeño de estudios de calidad limitada, los resultados de esta revisión sugieren que la comunicación de las estimaciones del riesgo de enfermedad basado en el ADN tiene un efecto pequeño o no tiene efecto en el hábito de fumar y la actividad física. Puede tener un efecto pequeño en la dieta autoinformada y en las intenciones de cambiar la conducta. Las afirmaciones acerca de que el hecho de recibir resultados de pruebas basadas en el ADN motiva a las personas a que cambien su conducta no son respaldadas por las pruebas. Se necesitan ECA más amplios y de más calidad.

Traducción

Traducción realizada por el Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Effets de la communication de l'estimation des risques de maladie sur la base de l'ADN sur les comportements visant à réduire les risques

Contexte

Le potentiel de la communication de l'estimation des risques de maladie sur la base de l'ADN pour motiver un changement de comportement suscite beaucoup d'attentes.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets de la communication de l'estimation des risques de maladie sur la base de l'ADN sur les comportements visant à réduire les risques et la volonté d'adopter de tels comportements.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons consulté les bases de données suivantes en utilisant des mots clés et intitulés médicaux : le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL, Bibliothèque Cochrane, numéro 4, 2010), MEDLINE (1950 à avril 2010), EMBASE (1980 à avril 2010), PsycINFO (1985 à avril 2010) en utilisant OVID SP, et CINAHL (EBSCO) (1982 à avril 2010). Nous avons également examiné les références bibliographiques, recherché d'autres références afin d'identifier des articles potentiellement éligibles et contacté les auteurs des études pertinentes afin de recueillir leurs suggestions. Il n'y avait aucune restriction concernant la langue. Les articles non publiés ou sous presse étaient éligibles dans la revue.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés ou quasi-randomisés portant sur des adultes (d'au moins 18 ans), dans lesquels un groupe recevait une estimation personnalisée réelle (études cliniques) ou imaginaire (études analogues) des risques de maladie sur la base de l'ADN concernant des maladies dont le risque pouvait raisonnablement être réduit par un changement de comportement. Les études éligibles devaient inclure une mesure du critère de jugement principal du comportement visant à réduire les risques ou de l'intention d'adopter ce comportement.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de revue ont recherché des études et extrait les données de manière indépendante. Le risque de biais a été évalué conformément aux recommandations du manuel Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Pour les mesures de résultats continues, nous avons rapporté les quantités d'effet sous forme de différences moyennes standardisées (DMS). Pour les mesures de résultats dichotomiques, nous avons rapporté les quantités d'effet sous forme de rapports des cotes. Nous avons obtenu les quantités d'effet combinées avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 % à l'aide du modèle à effets aléatoires appliqué à l'échelle des différences standardisées et des logarithmes des rapports des cotes.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons examiné 5 384 résumés et identifié 21 études potentiellement éligibles. Après avoir analysé le texte intégral, nous avons inclus 14 articles rapportant les résultats de 7 études cliniques (2 articles documentaient le même essai) et de 6 études analogues.

Sur les sept études cliniques identifiées, cinq évaluaient le sevrage tabagique. Les méta-analyses ne révélaient aucun effet statistiquement significatif en termes de sevrage tabagique à court terme (moins de 6 mois) (rapport des cotes de 1,35, IC à 95 %, entre 0,76 et 2,39, P = 0,31, n = 3 études) ou de sevrage après six mois (rapport des cotes de 1,07, IC à 95 %, entre 0,64 et 1,78, P = 0,80, n = 4 études). Deux études cliniques évaluaient le régime alimentaire et rapportaient des effets significatifs favorables à l'estimation des risques basée sur l'ADN (rapport des cotes de 2,24, IC à 95 %, entre 1,17 et 4,27, P = 0,01). Aucun effet statistiquement significatif n'était observé dans les deux études évaluant l'activité physique (rapport des cotes de 1,03, IC à 95 %, entre 0,59 et 1,80, P = 0,92) ou la seule étude évaluant des médicaments ou des vitamines visant à réduire les risques de maladie (rapport des cotes de 1,26, IC à 95 %, entre 0,58 et 2,72, P = 0,56).

Pour les six études analogues non cliniques, la méta-analyse révélait un effet statistiquement significatif du risque basé sur l'ADN sur l'intention de changer de comportement (DMS de 0,16, IC à 95 %, entre 0,04 et 0,29, P = 0,01).

Aucune preuve n'indiquait que la communication de l'estimation des risques de maladie basée sur l'ADN était associée à des effets indésirables. Deux études évaluant la peur tout de suite après la présentation des informations rapportait cependant une peur accrue dans les groupes de l'estimation des risques de maladie basée sur l'ADN par rapport aux groupes témoins.

La qualité des études incluses était globalement faible. Aucune des études cliniques ou analogues n'était associée à un faible risque de biais en raison d'une documentation peu claire ou, lorsque des détails étaient fournis, de signes indiquant que les mesures nécessaires pour prévenir le risque de biais n'avaient pas été prises.

Conclusions des auteurs

Sur la base de preuves non concluantes issues d'un petit nombre d'études de qualité limitée, les résultats de cette revue suggèrent que la communication de l'estimation des risques de maladie basée sur l'ADN n'a que peu ou pas d'effet sur le sevrage tabagique et l'activité physique. Elle pourrait avoir un petit effet sur le régime alimentaire rapporté par les patients et l'intention de changer de comportement. Aucune preuve ne vient étayer l'hypothèse selon laquelle les résultats des analyses d'ADN motiveraient les patients à changer de comportement. Des essais à plus grande échelle et de meilleure qualité sont nécessaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Effets de la communication de l'estimation des risques de maladie sur la base de l'ADN sur les comportements visant à réduire les risques

La communication de l'estimation des risques sur la base de l'ADN motive-t-elle les patients à modifier leur comportement ?

Aujourd'hui, des analyses d'ADN peuvent être effectuées pour estimer la probabilité de développer des maladies telles qu'une cardiopathie ou un cancer du poumon chez les fumeurs. On pense que l'estimation des risques issue de ces analyses génétiques pourrait motiver les patients à modifier leur comportement afin de réduire les risques identifiés. Dans le cadre de cette revue, nous avons évalué les effets de la communication de l'estimation des risques de maladie issue des analyses génétiques sur les comportements visant à réduire les risques et la volonté d'adopter de tels comportements.

Une recherche systématique nous a permis d'identifier 14 articles rapportant les résultats de 13 études éligibles : sept études cliniques et six études analogues (études dans lesquelles des scénarios hypothétiques sont assignés aux participants, qui doivent imaginer qu'ils reçoivent une estimation des risques de maladie issue d'analyses génétiques).

Cinq études cliniques évaluaient le sevrage tabagique, et la combinaison statistique des résultats ne révélait aucun effet statistiquement significatif sur le sevrage tabagique à court terme (< six mois) ou à long terme (> six mois). Deux études cliniques évaluaient le comportement alimentaire et montraient que la communication de l'estimation des risques sur la base des analyses génétiques modifiait le comportement des participants.Les deux études évaluant l'activité physique et la seule étude évaluant l'utilisation de médicaments ou de vitamines visant à réduire les risques de maladie rapportaient que la communication de l'estimation des risques de maladie sur la base de l'ADN n'avait aucun effet sur le comportement.

Dans les six études analogues, la combinaison statistique des résultats révélait que l'estimation des risques de maladie sur la base des analyses génétiques avait un effet statistiquement significatif sur l'intention de changer de comportement (uniquement). Aucune preuve d'effet adverse sur la motivation ou l'humeur n'était rapportée.

En résumé, les preuves actuellement disponibles, de quantité et de qualité limitées, suggèrent que la communication de l'estimation des risques de maladie sur la base des analyses génétiques pourrait n'avoir que peu ou pas d'effet sur le comportement, mais pourrait avoir un petit effet sur l'intention de changer de comportement. Des essais à plus grande échelle mieux planifiés sont nécessaires.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st June, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.