Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Acupuncture for menopausal hot flushes

  1. Sylvie Dodin1,*,
  2. Claudine Blanchet1,
  3. Isabelle Marc2,
  4. Edzard Ernst3,
  5. Taixiang Wu4,
  6. Caroline Vaillancourt5,
  7. Joalee Paquette6,
  8. Elizabeth Maunsell7

Editorial Group: Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group

Published Online: 30 JUL 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 15 JAN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007410.pub2


How to Cite

Dodin S, Blanchet C, Marc I, Ernst E, Wu T, Vaillancourt C, Paquette J, Maunsell E. Acupuncture for menopausal hot flushes. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD007410. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007410.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Université Laval, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Quebec, Canada

  2. 2

    Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Département de pédiatrie, Université Laval, Québec, Québec, Canada

  3. 3

    Peninsula Medical School, University of Exeter, Complementary Medicine Department, Exeter, UK

  4. 4

    West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, Chinese Ethics Committee of Registering Clinical Trials, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

  5. 5

    Université Laval, Québec, Québec, Canada

  6. 6

    Institut des nutraceutiques et des aliments fonctionnels, Québec, Canada

  7. 7

    Hopital du Saint-Sacrement, Centre de recherche, Quebec, QC, Canada

*Sylvie Dodin, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Université Laval, 45, Leclerc - Room D6-723, Quebec, G1L 2G1, Canada. sylvie.dodin@ogy.ulaval.ca.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 30 JUL 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. アブストラクト
  5. 平易な要約

Background

Hot flushes are the most common menopausal vasomotor symptom. Hormone therapy (HT) has frequently been recommended for relief of hot flushes, but concerns about the health risks of HT have encouraged women to seek alternative treatments. It has been suggested that acupuncture may reduce hot flush frequency and severity.

Objectives

To determine whether acupuncture is effective and safe for reducing hot flushes and improving the quality of life of menopausal women with vasomotor symptoms.

Search methods

We searched the following databases in January 2013: the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), Chinese Medical Current Content (CMCC), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), VIP database, Dissertation Abstracts International, Current Controlled Trials, Clinicaltrials.gov, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), BIOSIS, AMED, Acubriefs, and Acubase.

Selection criteria

Randomized controlled trials comparing any type of acupuncture to no treatment/control or other treatments for reducing menopausal hot flushes and improving the quality of life of symptomatic perimenopausal/postmenopausal women were eligible for inclusion.

Data collection and analysis

Sixteen studies, with 1155 women, were eligible for inclusion. Three review authors independently assessed trial eligibility and quality, and extracted data. We pooled data where appropriate and calculated mean differences (MDs) and standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We evaluated the overall quality of the evidence using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria.

Main results

Eight studies compared acupuncture versus sham acupuncture. No significant difference was found between the groups for hot flush frequency (MD -1.13 flushes per day, 95% CI -2.55 to 0.29, 8 RCTs, 414 women, I2 = 70%, low-quality evidence) but flushes were significantly less severe in the acupuncture group, with a small effect size (SMD -0.45, 95% CI -0.84 to -0.05, 6 RCTs, 297 women, I2 = 62%, very-low-quality evidence). There was substantial heterogeneity for both these outcomes. In a post hoc sensitivity analysis excluding studies of women with breast cancer, heterogeneity was reduced to 0% for hot flush frequency and 34% for hot flush severity and there was no significant difference between the groups for either outcome.

Three studies compared acupuncture versus HT. Acupuncture was associated with significantly more frequent hot flushes than HT (MD 3.18 flushes per day, 95% CI 2.06 to 4.29, 3 RCTs, 114 women, I2 = 0%, low-quality evidence). There was no significant difference between the groups for hot flush severity (SMD 0.53, 95% CI -0.14 to 1.20, 2 RCTs, 84 women, I2 = 57%, low-quality evidence).

One study compared electroacupuncture versus relaxation. There was no significant difference between the groups for either hot flush frequency (MD -0.40 flushes per day, 95% CI -2.18 to 1.38, 1 RCT, 38 women, very-low-quality evidence) or hot flush severity (MD 0.20, 95% CI -0.85 to 1.25, 1 RCT, 38 women, very-low-quality evidence).

Four studies compared acupuncture versus waiting list or no intervention. Traditional acupuncture was significantly more effective in reducing hot flush frequency from baseline (SMD -0.50, 95% CI -0.69 to -0.31, 3 RCTs, 463 women, I2 = 0%, low-quality evidence), and was also significantly more effective in reducing hot flush severity (SMD -0.54, 95% CI -0.73 to -0.35, 3 RCTs, 463 women, I2 = 0%, low-quality evidence). The effect size was moderate in both cases.

For quality of life measures, acupuncture was significantly less effective than HT, but traditional acupuncture was significantly more effective than no intervention. There was no significant difference between acupuncture and other comparators for quality of life. Data on adverse effects were lacking.

Authors' conclusions

We found insufficient evidence to determine whether acupuncture is effective for controlling menopausal vasomotor symptoms. When we compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture, there was no evidence of a significant difference in their effect on menopausal vasomotor symptoms. When we compared acupuncture with no treatment there appeared to be a benefit from acupuncture, but acupuncture appeared to be less effective than HT. These findings should be treated with great caution as the evidence was low or very low quality and the studies comparing acupuncture versus no treatment or HT were not controlled with sham acupuncture or placebo HT. Data on adverse effects were lacking.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. アブストラクト
  5. 平易な要約

Acupuncture for menopausal hot flushes

Review question: Is acupuncture safe and effective for reducing hot flushes and improving the quality of life of menopausal women with hot flushes?

Background: Hot flushes are the most common symptoms related to perimenopause and menopause. Hormone therapy (HT) is considered to be the most effective treatment for symptoms. However, studies have reported that hormone therapies may have some negative health effects and many women are now choosing not to use these and are looking for alternatives such as acupuncture. Cochrane review authors examined the evidence, which is current to January 2013.

Study characteristics: Sixteen randomized controlled trials, with 1155 women, were included in the review. Most were small and of short duration. 15 of the 16 included studies reported their funding sources.

Key findings: When acupuncture was compared with sham acupuncture, there was no evidence of any difference in their effect on hot flushes. When acupuncture was compared with no treatment, there appeared to be a benefit from acupuncture, but acupuncture appeared to be less effective than HT.

Quality of the evidence: These findings should be treated with great caution as the evidence was low or very low quality and the studies comparing acupuncture with no treatment or HT were not controlled with sham acupuncture or placebo HT. Data on adverse effects were lacking.

 

アブストラクト

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. アブストラクト
  5. 平易な要約

更年期のホットフラッシュに対する鍼療法

背景

ホットフラッシュは最も一般的な更年期の血管運動神経系症状である。ホルモン療法(HT)はホットフラッシュの軽減に頻繁に推奨されるが、HTの健康リスクの懸念により、女性の代替療法のへ関心が高まっている。鍼療法がホットフラッシュの頻度と重症度を低下する可能性が指摘されている。

目的

鍼療法がホットフラッシュ軽減に効果的かつ安全で、血管運動神経系症状のある更年期女性の生活の質を改善するかどうかを検討すること。

検索戦略

2013年1月に下記のデータベースを検索した。the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Trials Reg- ister、Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL)、PubMed、 EMBASE、CINAHL、PsycINFO、Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM)、Chinese Medical Current Content (CMCC)、China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI)、VIP database、Dissertation Abstracts International、Current Controlled Trials、 Clinicaltrials.gov、National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)、BIOSIS、AMED、Acubriefs、Acubase。

選択基準

あらゆる種類の鍼療法と、無治療/対照または更年期のホットフラッシュ軽減のための治療および症状がある閉経周辺期/閉経後の女性の生活の質向上のための他の治療とを比較したランダム化比較試験(RCT)を組入れの対象とした。

データ収集と分析

16件の試験における女性1155例を組入れの対象とした。3名のレビュー著者が独立して試験の適性と質を評価し、データを抽出した。適所でデータをプールし、平均差(MD)、標準化平均差(SMD)を95%信頼区間(CI)と共に算出した。Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE)基準を用いて、全体的なエビデンスの質を評価した。

主な結果

8件の試験が鍼療法と偽鍼療法とを比較した。ホットフラッシュ頻度における群間に有為差は認められなかった(MD -1.13フラッシュ /日、95% CI -2.55〜0.29、8 件の試験、女性414名、I2 = 70%、エビデンスの質は低い)が、鍼療法群ではフラッシュの重症度が有意に低く、効果サイズは小さかった(SMD -0.45、95% CI -0.84 〜 -0.05、6件の試験、女性297名、I2= 62%、エビデンスの質は非常に低い)。 これらのアウトカムは共に実質的な異質性がみられた。乳癌の女性を除外した研究の事後感受性解析では、異質性はホットフラッシュ頻度で0%、ホットフラッシュ重症度で34%に低減し、どちらのアウトカムにも群間の有意差は認められなかった。

3件の試験が鍼療法とHTとを比較した。鍼療法は、HTと比較して、有意に高いホットフラッシュ頻度に関連していた(MD 3.18 フラッシュ/日、95% CI 2.06〜4.29、3 件の試験、女性114名、I2= 0%、エビデンスの質は低い)。 ホットフラッシュ重症度において群間に有意差は認められなかった(MD 0.53、95% CI -0.14〜1.20、2件の試験、女性84名、I2= 57%、エビデンスの質は低い)。

1件の試験は、電気鍼療法とリラクゼーションとを比較した。ホットフラッシュ頻度において群間に有意差は認められず(MD -0.40フラッシュ/日、95% CI -2.18〜1.38、1件の試験、女性38名、エビデンスの質は非常に低い)、ホットフラッシュ重症度においても認められなかった(MD 0.20、95% CI -0.85〜1.25、1件の試験、女性38名、エビデンスの質は非常に低い)。

4件の試験が鍼療法と待機者リスト、または無介入とを比較した。伝統的な鍼療法は、ベースラインからホットフラッシュ頻度の低減に有意な効果がみられ(SMD -0.50、95% CI   -0.69 〜 -0.31、3件の試験、女性463名、I2= 0%、エビデンスの質は低い)、ホットフラッシュ重症度の低減にも有意な効果がみられた(SMD -0.54、95% CI -0.73 〜 -0.35、3件の試験、女性463名、I2 = 0%、エビデンスの質は低い)。 効果サイズは両症例で中等度であった。

生活の質評価では、鍼療法がHTと比較して有意な効果はみられなかったが、伝統的な鍼療法は無介入と比較して、有意な効果がみられた。生活の質において、鍼療法と他の比較対象との有意差は認められなかった。有害作用に関するデータは明記されていなかった。

著者の結論

鍼療法における更年期の血管運動神経系症状の効果を決定するには、エビデンスが不十分であった。鍼療法と偽鍼療法とを比較すると、更年期の血管運動神経系症状における効果に有意差を示すエビデンスは認められなかった。鍼療法と無治療とを比較すると、鍼療法にベネフィットがあると考えられるが、鍼療法はHTと比較して効果が少ないと考えられる。エビデンスの質が低い、または非常に低いため、これらの所見は十分な注意の元に扱われるべきである。また、鍼療法と無治療またはHTとの比較試験は、偽鍼療法またはプラセボHTとの対照ではなかった。有害作用に関するデータは明記されていなかった。

訳注

《実施組織》厚生労働省「「統合医療」に係る情報発信等推進事業」(eJIM:http://www.ejim.ncgg.go.jp/)[2016.1.4]
《注意》この日本語訳は、臨床医、疫学研究者などによる翻訳のチェックを受けて公開していますが、訳語の間違いなどお気づきの点がございましたら、eJIM事務局までご連絡ください。なお、2013年6月からコクラン・ライブラリーのNew review, Updated reviewとも日単位で更新されています。eJIMでは最新版の日本語訳を掲載するよう努めておりますが、タイム・ラグが生じている場合もあります。ご利用に際しては、最新版(英語版)の内容をご確認ください。

 

平易な要約

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. アブストラクト
  5. 平易な要約

更年期のホットフラッシュに対する鍼療法

レビューの論点:鍼療法は、ホットフラッシュの軽減に安全かつ効果的で、ホットフラッシュのある更年期女性の生活の質を改善するか。

背景:ホットフラッシュは閉経周辺期および閉経に関連する最も一般的な症状である。ホルモン療法(HT)は症状に対する最も有効な治療法と考えられている。しかし、ホルモン療法は悪影響がある可能性を指摘されていて、多くの女性はホルモン療法を使用せず、鍼療法などの代替療法を模索している。コクラン・レビュー著者が調査したエビデンスは、現在から2013年1月までである。

研究の特性:16件のランダム化比較試験の女性1155名をレビューの対象とした。ほとんどが小規模で短期間であった。16件のうち15件の試験で資金提供元が報告されていた。

主要な所見:鍼療法を偽鍼療法と比較すると、ホットフラッシュに対する効果の差を示すエビデンスは認められなかった。鍼療法を無治療と比較すると、鍼療法のベネフィットがあると考えられるが、HTと比較すると効果が低いと考えられる。

エビデンスの質:エビデンスの質は低い、または非常に低いため、これらの所見は十分な注意の元に扱われるべきである。また、鍼療法と無治療またはHTとの比較試験は、偽鍼療法またはプラセボHTとの対照ではなかった。有害作用に関するデータは明記されていなかった。

訳注

《実施組織》厚生労働省「「統合医療」に係る情報発信等推進事業」(eJIM:http://www.ejim.ncgg.go.jp/)[2016.1.4]
《注意》この日本語訳は、臨床医、疫学研究者などによる翻訳のチェックを受けて公開していますが、訳語の間違いなどお気づきの点がございましたら、eJIM事務局までご連絡ください。なお、2013年6月からコクラン・ライブラリーのNew review, Updated reviewとも日単位で更新されています。eJIMでは最新版の日本語訳を掲載するよう努めておりますが、タイム・ラグが生じている場合もあります。ご利用に際しては、最新版(英語版)の内容をご確認ください。