Intervention Protocol

Mitomycin C for prevention of postoperative haze following excimer laser surface ablation in moderate to high myopia

  1. Guilherme Quinto1,*,
  2. Walter Camacho1,
  3. Juan-Castro Combs1,
  4. Satyanarayana S Vedula2,
  5. Elliott H Myrowitz3,
  6. Roy S Chuck1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group

Published Online: 8 OCT 2008

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007418

How to Cite

Quinto G, Camacho W, Combs JC, Vedula SS, Myrowitz EH, Chuck RS. Mitomycin C for prevention of postoperative haze following excimer laser surface ablation in moderate to high myopia (Protocol). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2008, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD007418. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007418.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, The Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute, Baltimore, USA

  2. 2

    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group US Project, Baltimore, MD, USA

  3. 3

    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, The Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute, Lutherville, USA

*Guilherme Quinto, The Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe Street, 255 Woods Building, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. g.quinto@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 8 OCT 2008

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Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows:

Primary objectives

The aim of this review is to evaluate the effects of MMC on the cornea and answer the question: is there sufficient evidence for using intraoperative topical MMC on the cornea in surface ablation (PRK or LASEK or epi-LASIK) as prophylaxis for haze formation and to reduce refractive regression?

This review will address the use of MMC in the prophylaxis of myopic patients who underwent PRK or LASEK or epi-LASIK.

Secondary objectives

If sufficient data are available, a secondary objective of this review is to determine the refractive predictability and complications with different concentrations and times of exposure to MMC as well as to find out if there are differences in proportion of patients with haze among different laser platforms used for PRK, LASEK, and epi-LASIK. Refractive predictability is defined as the difference between the attempted and achieved refractive change, in other words, the difference between the mean postoperative spherical equivalent (SE) and the target SE using the manifest refraction (Joo 2005).