Intervention Review

Mobile phone messaging for preventive health care

  1. Vlasta Vodopivec-Jamsek1,*,
  2. Thyra de Jongh2,
  3. Ipek Gurol-Urganci3,
  4. Rifat Atun4,
  5. Josip Car1,5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Consumers and Communication Group

Published Online: 12 DEC 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 12 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007457.pub2


How to Cite

Vodopivec-Jamsek V, de Jongh T, Gurol-Urganci I, Atun R, Car J. Mobile phone messaging for preventive health care. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD007457. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007457.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Ljubljana, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ljubljana, Slovenia

  2. 2

    Gephyra IHC, Amsterdam, Netherlands

  3. 3

    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Health Services Research and Policy, London, UK

  4. 4

    Imperial College London, Imperial College Business School, London, UK

  5. 5

    Imperial College London, Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Public Health, London, UK

*Vlasta Vodopivec-Jamsek, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Poljanski nasip 58, Ljubljana, 1000, Slovenia. vlasta.vodopivec@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 12 DEC 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Preventive health care promotes health and prevents disease or injuries by addressing factors that lead to the onset of a disease, and by detecting latent conditions to reduce or halt their progression. Many risk factors for costly and disabling conditions (such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, and chronic respiratory diseases) can be prevented, yet healthcare systems do not make the best use of their available resources to support this process. Mobile phone messaging applications, such as Short Message Service (SMS) and Multimedia Message Service (MMS), could offer a convenient and cost-effective way to support desirable health behaviours for preventive health care.

Objectives

To assess the effects of mobile phone messaging interventions as a mode of delivery for preventive health care, on health status and health behaviour outcomes.

Search methods

We searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 2), MEDLINE (OvidSP) (January 1993 to June 2009), EMBASE (OvidSP) (January 1993 to June 2009), PsycINFO (OvidSP) (January 1993 to June 2009), CINAHL (EbscoHOST) (January 1993 to June 2009), LILACS (January 1993 to June 2009) and African Health Anthology (January 1993 to June 2009).

We also reviewed grey literature (including trial registers) and reference lists of articles.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised controlled trials (QRCTs), controlled before-after (CBA) studies, and interrupted time series (ITS) studies with at least three time points before and after the intervention. We included studies using SMS or MMS as a mode of delivery for any type of preventive health care. We only included studies in which it was possible to assess the effects of mobile phone messaging independent of other technologies or interventions.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed all studies against the inclusion criteria, with any disagreements resolved by a third review author. Study design features, characteristics of target populations, interventions and controls, and results data were extracted by two review authors and confirmed by a third author. Primary outcomes of interest were health status and health behaviour outcomes. We also considered patients’ and providers’ evaluation of the intervention, perceptions of safety, health service utilisation and costs, and potential harms or adverse effects. Because the included studies were heterogeneous in type of condition addressed, intervention characteristics and outcome measures, we did not consider that it was justified to conduct a meta-analysis to derive an overall effect size for the main outcome categories; instead, we present findings narratively.

Main results

We included four randomised controlled trials involving 1933 participants.

For the primary outcome category of health, there was moderate quality evidence from one study that women who received prenatal support via mobile phone messages had significantly higher satisfaction than those who did not receive the messages, both in the antenatal period (mean difference (MD) 1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78 to 1.72) and perinatal period (MD 1.19, 95% CI 0.37 to 2.01). Their confidence level was also higher (MD 1.12, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.73) and anxiety level was lower (MD -2.15, 95% CI -3.42 to -0.88) than in the control group in the antenatal period. In this study, no further differences were observed between groups in the perinatal period. There was low quality evidence that the mobile phone messaging intervention did not affect pregnancy outcomes (gestational age at birth, infant birth weight, preterm delivery and route of delivery).

For the primary outcome category of health behaviour, there was moderate quality evidence from one study that mobile phone message reminders to take vitamin C for preventive reasons resulted in higher adherence (risk ratio (RR) 1.41, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.74). There was high quality evidence from another study that participants receiving mobile phone messaging support had a significantly higher likelihood of quitting smoking than those in a control group at 6 weeks (RR 2.20, 95% CI 1.79 to 2.70) and at 12 weeks follow-up (RR 1.55, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.84). At 26 weeks, there was only a significant difference between groups if, for participants with missing data, the last known value was carried forward. There was very low quality evidence from one study that mobile phone messaging interventions for self-monitoring of healthy behaviours related to childhood weight control did not have a statistically significant effect on physical activity, consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages or screen time.

For the secondary outcome of acceptability, there was very low quality evidence from one study that user evaluation of the intervention was similar between groups. There was moderate quality evidence from one study of no difference in adverse effects of the intervention, measured as rates of pain in the thumb or finger joints, and car crash rates.

None of the studies reported the secondary outcomes of health service utilisation or costs of the intervention.

Authors' conclusions

We found very limited evidence that in certain cases mobile phone messaging interventions may support preventive health care, to improve health status and health behaviour outcomes. However, because of the low number of participants in three of the included studies, combined with study limitations of risk of bias and lack of demonstrated causality, the evidence for these effects is of low to moderate quality. The evidence is of high quality only for interventions aimed at smoking cessation. Furthermore, there are significant information gaps regarding the long-term effects, risks and limitations of, and user satisfaction with, such interventions.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Mobile phone messaging for preventive health care

Many costly and disabling conditions such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer or diabetes are linked by common preventable risk factors like tobacco use, unhealthy nutrition, physical inactivity and excessive alcohol use. However, prevention still plays a secondary role in many health systems as all too often, healthcare workers fail to seize interactions with patient as opportunities to inform them about health promotion and disease prevention strategies. This review examined whether mobile phone applications such as Short Message Service (SMS) and Multimedia Message Service (MMS) can support and enhance primary preventive health interventions.

There was moderate quality evidence from one study which showed that pregnant women who received supportive, informative text messages experienced higher satisfaction and confidence, and lower anxiety levels in the antenatal period than women who did not receive these. There was low quality evidence that there was no difference in pregnancy outcomes.

We found one trial that provided high quality evidence that regular support messages sent by text message can help people to quit smoking, at least in the short-term. One study assessing whether mobile phone messaging promoted use of preventive medication reported moderate quality evidence of higher self-reported adherence by people receiving the messages. A fourth study on healthy behaviours in children found very low quality evidence showing that the interventions had no effect.

There was very low quality evidence from one study that people's evaluation of the intervention was similar between groups. There was moderate quality evidence from one study of no difference in harms of the intervention, measured as rates of pain in the thumb or finger joints, and car crash rates. There were no studies reporting outcomes related to health service utilisation or costs.

Although we find that, overall, mobile phone messaging can be helpful for some aspects of preventive health care, much is not yet known about the long-term effects or potential negative consequences.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Messages par téléphone portable dans les soins de santé préventifs

Contexte

Les soins de santé préventifs aident à promouvoir la santé et à prévenir des maladies ou des blessures en luttant contre les facteurs déclencheurs d'une maladie et en identifiant ses affections latentes afin de réduire ou de freiner leur progression. Plusieurs facteurs de risques provoquant des affections coûteuses et invalidantes (comme les maladies cardiovasculaires, le cancer, le diabète et les maladies respiratoires chroniques) peuvent être évités. Cependant, les systèmes de soins de santé n'exploitent pas pleinement les ressources dont ils disposent pour prendre en charge ce processus. Les applications de messagerie par téléphone portable, comme les SMS (Short Message Service) et les MMS (Multimedia Message Service), peuvent fournir une méthode pratique et économique permettant de promouvoir des comportements de santé souhaitables dans le cadre de soins de santé préventifs.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets d'interventions consistant à envoyer des messages par téléphone portable comme méthode d'administration de soins de santé préventifs sur les résultats relatifs à l'état de santé et aux comportements de santé.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans : le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2009, numéro 2), MEDLINE (OvidSP) (de janvier 1993 à juin 2009), EMBASE (OvidSP) (de janvier 1993 à juin 2009), PsycINFO (OvidSP) (de janvier 1993 à juin 2009), CINAHL (EBSCOhost) (de janvier 1993 à juin 2009), LILACS (de janvier 1993 à juin 2009) et African Health Anthology (de janvier 1993 à juin 2009).

Nous avons également consulté la littérature grise (y compris les registres d'essais) et les listes bibliographiques des articles.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), des essais contrôlés quasi randomisés (ECQR), des études contrôlées avant-après (CAA) et des études de séries temporelles interrompues (STI) disposant d'au moins trois points temporels avant et après l'intervention. Nous avons inclus des études utilisant les SMS et les MMS comme méthode d'administration de tout type de soin de santé préventif. Nous avons uniquement inclus les études dans lesquelles il était possible d'évaluer les effets de la messagerie par téléphone portable indépendamment d'autres technologies ou interventions.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué l'ensemble des études par rapport à des critères d'inclusion, tout désaccord étant résolu par un troisième auteur. Les détails de conception des études, les caractéristiques des populations cibles, les interventions et les contrôles, ainsi que les données de résultat, ont été extraits par deux auteurs de la revue et confirmés par un troisième. Les critères de jugement principaux étaient les résultats concernant l'état de santé et le comportement de santé. Nous avons également pris en compte l'appréciation des interventions par les patients et les prestataires de santé, leur perception en termes de sécurité, de coûts, ainsi que les préjudices ou effets indésirables potentiels liés à l'utilisation de ces services de santé. Étant donné que les études incluses étaient hétérogènes quant au type d'affection ciblé, aux caractéristiques et aux critères de jugement des interventions, nous n'avons pas jugé nécessaire de réaliser une méta-analyse afin de déduire l'ampleur globale des effets des principales catégories de résultats ; à la place, nous avons décidé de présenter les résultats de façon narrative.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons inclus quatre essais contrôlés randomisés impliquant 1 933 participants.

Pour le critère de jugement principal santé, il y avait des preuves de qualité moyenne issues d'une étude selon lesquelles une amélioration de la satisfaction était constatée chez les femmes ayant bénéficié d'un soutien prénatal via l'envoi de messages par téléphone portable par rapport à celles n'ayant reçu aucun message, pendant la période prénatale (différence moyenne (DM) 1,25, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 0,78 à 1,72) et la période périnatale (DM 1,19, IC à 95 % 0,37 à 2,01). Leur niveau de confiance était également en hausse (DM 1,12, IC à 95 % 0,51 à 1,73) et leur niveau d'anxiété était en baisse (DM - 2,15, IC à 95 % - 3,42 à - 0,88) par rapport au groupe témoin pendant la période prénatale. Dans cette étude, aucune autre différence n'a été observée entre les groupes pendant la période périnatale. Il y avait des preuves de qualité médiocre selon lesquelles l'intervention consistant à envoyer des messages par téléphone portable n'influait pas sur les résultats de la grossesse (âge gestationnel à la naissance, poids de naissance du nouveau-né, accouchement prématuré et voie d'accouchement).

Pour le critère de jugement principal comportement de santé correspondant aux critères de jugement principaux, il y avait des preuves de qualité moyenne issues d'une étude selon lesquelles l'envoi de messages de rappel par téléphone portable invitant à prendre de la vitamine C pour des raisons préventives améliorait l'observance (risques relatifs (RR) 1,41, IC à 95 % 1,14 à 1,74). Il y avait des preuves de grande qualité provenant d'une autre étude selon lesquelles les participants recevant des messages de soutien par téléphone portable avaient significativement plus de chances d'arrêter de fumer que ceux du groupe témoin au bout de six semaines (RR 2,20, IC à 95 % 1,79 à 2,70) et de 12 semaines de suivi (RR 1,55, IC à 95 % 1,30 à 1,84). À 26 semaines, il n'y avait qu'une différence significative entre les groupes si, pour les participants dont les données étaient manquantes, la dernière valeur connue était reportée. Il y avait des preuves de qualité très médiocre issues d'une étude selon lesquelles les interventions consistant à envoyer des messages par téléphone portable pour l'auto-surveillance de comportements sains liés au contrôle du poids à l'enfance n'avaient aucun effet statistiquement significatif sur l'activité physique, la consommation de boissons sucrées ou le temps passé devant un écran.

Pour le critère secondaire d'acceptabilité, il y avait des preuves de qualité très médiocre issues d'une étude selon lesquelles l'évaluation de l'intervention par les utilisateurs était similaire entre les groupes. Il y avait des preuves de qualité moyenne issues d'une étude montrant l'absence de différence concernant les effets indésirables de ces interventions, mesurés par des taux de douleur au pouce ou aux articulations des doigts et des taux d'accidents de voiture.

Aucune de ces études n'a rapporté de critères de jugement secondaires concernant l'utilisation de ces services de santé ou les coûts de ces interventions.

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous avons trouvé des preuves très limitées selon lesquelles, dans certains cas, les interventions consistant à envoyer des messages par téléphone portable peuvent améliorer les soins de santé préventifs afin d'améliorer les résultats relatifs à l'état de santé et au comportement de santé. Toutefois, étant donné le faible nombre de participants dans trois des études incluses, associé aux limitations des études en termes de risques de biais et au manque de causalité démontrée, les preuves de ces effets sont de qualité médiocre à moyenne. Les preuves sont de qualité élevée uniquement pour les interventions de sevrage tabagique. De plus, il existe des écarts d'informations significatifs concernant les effets à long terme, les risques et les limitations de ces interventions, ainsi qu'au niveau de la satisfaction des utilisateurs.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Messages par téléphone portable dans les soins de santé préventifs

Plusieurs affections coûteuses et invalidantes, comme les maladies cardiovasculaires, le cancer ou le diabète, sont liées par des facteurs de risques évitables communs, comme le tabagisme, une mauvaise alimentation, la sédentarité et l'abus d'alcool. Toutefois, la prévention est toujours reléguée au second plan dans de nombreux systèmes de santé car les professionnels de santé négligent généralement toute opportunité d'interaction avec leurs patients afin de les informer de stratégies de promotion de la santé et de prévention des maladies. La présente revue a examiné si les applications pour téléphone portable, comme les SMS (Short Message Service) et les MMS (Multimedia Message Service), peuvent prendre en charge et faciliter les principales interventions de santé préventives.

Il y avait des preuves de qualité moyenne issues d'une étude montrant une amélioration de la satisfaction et de la confiance de femmes enceintes qui ont reçu des SMS informatifs et de soutien, ainsi qu'une baisse des niveaux d'anxiété pendant la période prénatale par rapport aux femmes qui n'ont reçu aucun SMS. Il y avait des preuves de qualité faible en faveur d'une absence de bénéfice sur les résultats de la grossesse.

Nous avons trouvé un essai avec des preuves de grande qualité selon lesquelles l'envoi régulier de messages de soutien pouvait aider les personnes à arrêter de fumer, du moins à court terme. Une étude évaluant si la messagerie par téléphone portable permettait de promouvoir un traitement préventif a rapporté des preuves de qualité moyenne concernant une hausse de l'observance signalée des personnes recevant des messages Une quatrième étude examinant les comportements sains des enfants a trouvé des preuves de qualité très médiocre concernant l'absence d'effets de ces interventions.

Il y avait des preuves de qualité très médiocre issues d'une étude selon lesquelles les évaluations données par les utilisateurs concernant les interventions étaient similaires entre les groupes. Il y avait des preuves de qualité moyenne issues d'une étude montrant l'absence de différence en termes de danger lié à ces interventions, mesuré par des taux de douleur au pouce ou aux articulations des doigts et des taux d'accidents de voiture. Il n'y avait aucune étude rapportant des résultats liés à l'utilisation ou aux coûts de ces services de santé.

Bien que, dans l'ensemble, nous pensions que la messagerie par téléphone portable peut être utile pour certains aspects des soins de santé préventifs, beaucoup reste à découvrir en termes d'effets ou de conséquences éventuelles négatives à long terme.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 10th January, 2013
Traduction financée par: Minist�re Fran�ais des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�