Intervention Review

Vitamin D supplementation for prevention of cancer in adults

  1. Goran Bjelakovic1,2,*,
  2. Lise Lotte Gluud3,
  3. Dimitrinka Nikolova2,
  4. Kate Whitfield4,
  5. Goran Krstic5,
  6. Jørn Wetterslev4,
  7. Christian Gluud2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Metabolic and Endocrine Disorders Group

Published Online: 23 JUN 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 30 JAN 2014

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007469.pub2


How to Cite

Bjelakovic G, Gluud LL, Nikolova D, Whitfield K, Krstic G, Wetterslev J, Gluud C. Vitamin D supplementation for prevention of cancer in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 6. Art. No.: CD007469. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007469.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Medical Faculty, University of Nis, Department of Internal Medicine, Nis, Serbia

  2. 2

    Copenhagen Trial Unit, Centre for Clinical Intervention Research, Department 7812, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group, Copenhagen, Denmark

  3. 3

    Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Gastrounit, Medical Division, Hvidovre, Denmark

  4. 4

    Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen Trial Unit, Centre for Clinical Intervention Research, Department 7812, Copenhagen, Denmark

  5. 5

    Environmental Health Services, Fraser Health Authority, New Westminster, BC, Canada

*Goran Bjelakovic, goranb@junis.ni.ac.rs.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 23 JUN 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

The evidence on whether vitamin D supplementation is effective in decreasing cancers is contradictory.

Objectives

To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of vitamin D supplementation for prevention of cancer in adults.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, Science Citation Index Expanded, and the Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science to February 2014. We scanned bibliographies of relevant publications and asked experts and pharmaceutical companies for additional trials.

Selection criteria

We included randomised trials that compared vitamin D at any dose, duration, and route of administration versus placebo or no intervention in adults who were healthy or were recruited among the general population, or diagnosed with a specific disease. Vitamin D could have been administered as supplemental vitamin D (vitamin D₃ (cholecalciferol) or vitamin D₂ (ergocalciferol)), or an active form of vitamin D (1α-hydroxyvitamin D (alfacalcidol), or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (calcitriol)).

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors extracted data independently. We conducted random-effects and fixed-effect model meta-analyses. For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated the risk ratios (RRs). We considered risk of bias in order to assess the risk of systematic errors. We conducted trial sequential analyses to assess the risk of random errors.

Main results

Eighteen randomised trials with 50,623 participants provided data for the analyses. All trials came from high-income countries. Most of the trials had a high risk of bias, mainly for-profit bias. Most trials included elderly community-dwelling women (aged 47 to 97 years). Vitamin D was administered for a weighted mean of six years. Fourteen trials tested vitamin D₃, one trial tested vitamin D₂, and three trials tested calcitriol supplementation. Cancer occurrence was observed in 1927/25,275 (7.6%) recipients of vitamin D versus 1943/25,348 (7.7%) recipients of control interventions (RR 1.00 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.94 to 1.06); P = 0.88; I² = 0%; 18 trials; 50,623 participants; moderate quality evidence according to the GRADE instrument). Trial sequential analysis (TSA) of the 18 vitamin D trials shows that the futility area is reached after the 10th trial, allowing us to conclude that a possible intervention effect, if any, is lower than a 5% relative risk reduction. We did not observe substantial differences in the effect of vitamin D on cancer in subgroup analyses of trials at low risk of bias compared to trials at high risk of bias; of trials with no risk of for-profit bias compared to trials with risk of for-profit bias; of trials assessing primary prevention compared to trials assessing secondary prevention; of trials including participants with vitamin D levels below 20 ng/mL at entry compared to trials including participants with vitamin D levels of 20 ng/mL or more at entry; or of trials using concomitant calcium supplementation compared to trials without calcium. Vitamin D decreased all-cause mortality (1854/24,846 (7.5%) versus 2007/25,020 (8.0%); RR 0.93 (95% CI 0.88 to 0.98); P = 0.009; I² = 0%; 15 trials; 49,866 participants; moderate quality evidence), but TSA indicates that this finding could be due to random errors. Cancer occurrence was observed in 1918/24,908 (7.7%) recipients of vitamin D₃ versus 1933/24,983 (7.7%) in recipients of control interventions (RR 1.00 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.06); P = 0.88; I² = 0%; 14 trials; 49,891 participants; moderate quality evidence). TSA of the vitamin D₃ trials shows that the futility area is reached after the 10th trial, allowing us to conclude that a possible intervention effect, if any, is lower than a 5% relative risk reduction. Vitamin D₃ decreased cancer mortality (558/22,286 (2.5%) versus 634/22,206 (2.8%); RR 0.88 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.98); P = 0.02; I² = 0%; 4 trials; 44,492 participants; low quality evidence), but TSA indicates that this finding could be due to random errors. Vitamin D₃ combined with calcium increased nephrolithiasis (RR 1.17 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.34); P = 0.02; I² = 0%; 3 trials; 42,753 participants; moderate quality evidence). TSA, however, indicates that this finding could be due to random errors. We did not find any data on health-related quality of life or health economics in the randomised trials included in this review.

Authors' conclusions

There is currently no firm evidence that vitamin D supplementation decreases or increases cancer occurrence in predominantly elderly community-dwelling women. Vitamin D₃ supplementation decreased cancer mortality and vitamin D supplementation decreased all-cause mortality, but these estimates are at risk of type I errors due to the fact that too few participants were examined, and to risks of attrition bias originating from substantial dropout of participants. Combined vitamin D₃ and calcium supplements increased nephrolithiasis, whereas it remains unclear from the included trials whether vitamin D₃, calcium, or both were responsible for this effect. We need more trials on vitamin D supplementation, assessing the benefits and harms among younger participants, men, and people with low vitamin D status, and assessing longer duration of treatments as well as higher dosages of vitamin D. Follow-up of all participants is necessary to reduce attrition bias.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Vitamin D supplementation for prevention of cancer in adults 

Review question

Does vitamin D supplementation prevent cancer?

Background

The available evidence on vitamin D and cancer occurrence is intriguing but inconclusive. Many observational studies as well as randomised trials suggest that high vitamin D levels in the blood are related to reduced cancer occurrence. However, results of randomised trials testing the effect of vitamin D supplementation for cancer prevention are contradictory.

Study characteristics

The aim of this systematic review was to analyse the benefits and harms of the different forms of vitamin D especially on cancer occurrence. A total of 18 trials provided data for this review; 50,623 participants were randomly assigned to either vitamin D or placebo or no treatment. All trials were conducted in high-income countries.

Key results

The age range of the participants was 47 to 97 years and on average 81% were women. The majority of the included participants did not have vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D administration lasted on average six years and most trial investigators used vitamin D₃ (cholecalciferol). We did not find firm evidence that vitamin D supplementation decreases or increases cancer occurrence in predominantly elderly community-dwelling women. We observed decreases in all-cause mortality and cancer-related mortality among the vitamin D/D₃ treated participants in comparison with the participants in the control groups. However, using trial sequential analysis, a statistical approach to reconfirm or question these findings, we conclude that these results could be due to random errors (play of chance). We also found evidence that combined vitamin D₃ and calcium supplements increased renal stone occurrence, but it remains unclear from the included trials whether vitamin D₃, calcium, or both were responsible for this effect. Moreover, these results could also be due to random errors (play of chance).

Quality of the evidence

A large number of the study participants left the trials before completion, and this raises concerns regarding the validity of the results. Most of the trials were judged not to be well and fairly conducted so that the results were likely to be biased (that is, possibly an overestimation of benefits and underestimation of harms).

Currentness of evidence

This evidence is up to date as of February 2014.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Supplémentation en vitamine D pour la prévention du cancer chez l'adulte

Contexte

Les preuves pour déterminer si la supplémentation en vitamine D est efficace pour réduire les cancers sont contradictoires.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets bénéfiques et nocifs de la supplémentation en vitamine D pour la prévention du cancer chez l'adulte.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, Science Citation Index Expanded, et le Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science jusqu'à février 2014. Nous avons passé au crible les bibliographies des publications pertinentes et avons interrogé des experts et des laboratoires pharmaceutiques pour obtenir des essais supplémentaires.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais randomisés qui comparaient de la vitamine D, quelles qu'en soient la dose, la durée et la voie d'administration, par rapport à un placebo ou à l'absence d'intervention chez les adultes qui étaient en bonne santé ou avaient été recrutés dans la population générale ou diagnostiqués avec une maladie spécifique. La vitamine D pouvait être administrée sous forme de supplémentation en vitamine D (vitamine D3 (colécalciférol) ou vitamine D2 (ergocalciférol)), ou une forme active de la vitamine D (1α-hydroxyvitamine D (alfacalcidol), ou 1,25 -dihydroxyvitamine D (calcitriol)).

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont extrait les données de manière indépendante. Nous avons réalisé des méta-analyses sur des modèles à effets aléatoires et à effets fixes. Pour les résultats dichotomiques, nous avons calculé les risques relatifs (RR). Nous avons pris en compte le risque de biais afin d'évaluer le risque d'erreurs systématiques. Nous avons réalisé des analyses séquentielles d'essais pour évaluer le risque d'erreurs aléatoires.

Résultats Principaux

Dix-huit essais randomisés avec 50 623 participants ont fourni des données pour les analyses. Tous les essais avaient été réalisés dans des pays à revenus élevés. La plupart des essais présentaient un risque élevé de biais, principalement du fait de leur financement. La plupart des essais incluaient des femmes âgées vivant en communauté (âgées de 47 à 97 ans). La vitamine D était administrée pendant une moyenne pondérée de six ans. Quatorze essais ont testé la vitamine D3, un essai avait testé la vitamine D2, et trois essais avaient testé le calcitriol en supplémentation. La survenue d'un cancer a été observée chez 1 927 / 25 275 (7,6 %) des receveurs de la vitamine D contre 1 943 / 25 348 (7,7 %) des receveurs d'interventions de contrôle (RR de 1,00 (intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % de 0,94 à 1,06) ; P = 0,88 ; I² = 0 % ; 18 essais ; 50 623 participants ; preuves de qualité modérée selon la méthode GRADE). L'analyse séquentielle des essais (ASE) sur les 18 essais de vitamine D montre que le domaine de futilité est atteint après le 10ème essai, nous permettant de conclure qu'un possible effet de l'intervention, le cas échéant, est plus faible qu'une réduction du risque relatif de 5 %. Nous n'avons pas observé d'importantes différences dans les effets de la vitamine D sur le cancer dans les analyses en sous-groupes des essais à faible risque de biais, par rapport à des essais à haut risque de biais ; des essais sans risque de biais en raison du financement de l’étude par rapport aux essais à risque ; des essais évaluant la prévention primaire par rapport aux essais évaluant la prévention secondaire ; des essais incluant des participants avec des niveaux de vitamine D en dessous de 20 ng/ml à l'entrée par rapport aux essais portant sur des participants ayant des niveaux de vitamine D de 20 ng/ml ou plus à l'entrée ; ou des essais portant sur l'utilisation concomitante de la supplémentation en calcium par rapport à des essais sans calcium. La vitamine D réduisait la mortalité toutes causes confondues (1 854 / 24 846 (7,5 %) versus 2 007 / 25 020 (8,0 %) ; RR 0,93 (IC à 95 % 0,88 à 0,98) ; P = 0,009 ; I² = 0 % ; 15 essais ; 49 866 participants ; preuves de qualité modérée), mais l’ASE indique que ce résultat pourrait être dû à des erreurs aléatoires. La survenue d'un cancer a été observée chez 1 918 / 24 908 (7,7 %) des receveurs de la vitamine D3 versus 1 933 / 24 983 (7,7 %) des receveurs d'interventions de contrôle (RR de 1,00 (IC à 95 % 0,94 à 1,06) ; P = 0,88 ; I² = 0 % ; 14 essais ; 49 891 participants ; preuves de qualité modérée). L’ASE des essais portant sur la vitamine D3 montre que le domaine de futilité est atteint après le 10ème essai, nous permettant de conclure qu'un possible effet de l'intervention, le cas échéant, est plus faible qu'une réduction du risque relatif de 5 %. La vitamine D3 a diminué la mortalité par cancer (558 / 22 286 (2,5 %) versus 634 / 22 206 (2,8 %) ; RR 0,88 (IC à 95 % 0,78 à 0,98) ; P = 0,02 ; I² = 0 % ; 4 essais ; 44 492 participants ; preuves de faible qualité), mais l’ASE indique que ce résultat pourrait être dû à des erreurs aléatoires. La vitamine D3 combinée à du calcium augmentait les calculs néphritiques (RR de 1,17 (IC à 95 % 1,03 à 1,34) ; P = 0,02 ; I² = 0 % ; 3 essais ; 42 753 participants ; preuves de qualité modérée). L’ASE, cependant, indique que ce résultat pourrait être dû à des erreurs aléatoires. Nous n'avons pas trouvé de données sur la qualité de vie liée à la santé ou l'économie de la santé dans les essais randomisés inclus dans cette revue.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il n'existe actuellement aucune preuve solide que la supplémentation en vitamine D diminue ou augmente l'incidence du cancer, principalement chez les femmes âgées vivant en communauté. La supplémentation en vitamine D3 a diminué la mortalité par cancer et la supplémentation en vitamine D a diminué la mortalité toutes causes, mais ces estimations sont à risque d'erreurs de type I en raison du fait que trop peu de participants ont été examinés, et des risques de biais d'attrition dus à un nombre substantiel de sorties d'étude des participants. Les supplémentations combinées en vitamine D3 et en calcium ont augmenté le taux de lithiases des voies urinaires, mais les essais inclus ne permettent pas de déterminer si la vitamine D3, le calcium, ou les deux étaient responsables de cet effet. Nous avons besoin de plus d'essais sur la supplémentation en vitamine D, évaluant les effets bénéfiques et délétères chez des participants plus jeunes, des hommes et des patients avec un faible niveau de vitamine D, et évaluant une durée plus longue de traitement, ainsi que des doses plus élevées de vitamine D. Le suivi de tous les participants est nécessaire pour réduire le biais d'attrition.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Supplémentation en vitamine D pour la prévention du cancer chez l'adulte

Supplémentation en vitamine D pour la prévention du cancer chez l'adulte

Question de la revue

La supplémentation en vitamine D prévient-elle le cancer ?

Contexte

Les preuves disponibles concernant la vitamine D et la survenue de cancer sont intrigantes mais pas concluantes. De nombreuses études observationnelles, ainsi que des essais randomisés suggèrent que des niveaux élevés de vitamine D dans le sang sont liés à une incidence réduite de cancer. Cependant, les résultats d'essais randomisés portant sur l'effet de la supplémentation en vitamine D pour la prévention du cancer sont contradictoires.

Les caractéristiques de l'étude

L'objectif de cette revue systématique était d'analyser les bénéfices et inconvénients de différentes formes de vitamine D, plus spécifiquement sur l'incidence du cancer. Un total de 18 essais ont fourni des données pour cette revue ; 50 623 participants ont été aléatoirement assignés à la vitamine D ou à un placebo ou à l'absence de traitement. Tous les essais ont été réalisés dans des pays à revenu élevé.

Résultats principaux

L'âge des participants était de 47 à 97 ans et en moyenne 81 % étaient des femmes. La majorité des participants inclus n'avaient pas de carence en vitamine D. L'administration de vitamine D a duré en moyenne six ans et la plupart des investigateurs des essais utilisaient de la vitamine D3 (colécalciférol). Nous n'avons pas trouvé de preuves solides indiquant que la supplémentation en vitamine D diminue ou augmente l’incidence du cancer, principalement chez les femmes âgées vivant en communauté. Nous avons observé une réduction de la mortalité toutes causes et de la mortalité liée au cancer chez les participants traités par vitamine D/D3, en comparaison avec les participants des groupes témoins. Néanmoins, l'utilisation de l'analyse séquentielle des essais, une approche statistique permettant de confirmer ou de remettre en question ces constatations, nous a amenés à conclure que ces résultats pourraient être dus à des erreurs aléatoires (jeu du hasard). Nous avons également identifié des preuves que l'association de suppléments à la vitamine D3 et au calcium augmente la survenue de calculs rénaux, mais les essais inclus ne permettent pas de conclure si la vitamine D3, le calcium, ou les deux étaient responsables de cet effet. En outre, ces résultats pourraient également être dus à des erreurs aléatoires (jeu du hasard).

Qualité des preuves

Un grand nombre de participants abandonnaient les essais, ce qui soulève des inquiétudes concernant la validité des résultats. Il a été estimé que la plupart des essais n’avait pas été correctement et impartialement conduits, de sorte que les résultats étaient susceptibles d'être biaisés (c’est-à-dire, une possible surestimation des effets bénéfiques et une sous-estimation des effets nocifs).

Actualité des preuves

Les preuves sont à jour en février 2014.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 12th September, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux ; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé