Intervention Review

Deferasirox for managing iron overload in people with thalassaemia

  1. Joerg J Meerpohl1,*,
  2. Gerd Antes2,
  3. Gerta Rücker2,
  4. Nigel Fleeman3,
  5. Edith Motschall2,
  6. Charlotte M Niemeyer4,
  7. Dirk Bassler5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group

Published Online: 15 FEB 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 25 NOV 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007476.pub2

How to Cite

Meerpohl JJ, Antes G, Rücker G, Fleeman N, Motschall E, Niemeyer CM, Bassler D. Deferasirox for managing iron overload in people with thalassaemia. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD007476. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007476.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Medical Center - University of Freiburg, German Cochrane Centre, Freiburg, Germany

  2. 2

    Institute of Medical Biometry and Medical Informatics, University Medical Center Freiburg, German Cochrane Centre, Freiburg, Germany

  3. 3

    University of Liverpool, Liverpool Reviews & Implementation Group, Liverpool, UK

  4. 4

    University Medical Center Freiburg, Pediatric Hematology & Oncology, Center for Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, Freiburg, Germany

  5. 5

    University Children's Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Tuebingen, Germany

*Joerg J Meerpohl, German Cochrane Centre, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Berliner Allee 29, Freiburg, 79110, Germany. meerpohl@cochrane.de. joerg.meerpohl@uniklinik-freiburg.de.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 15 FEB 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Thalassemia is a hereditary anaemia due to ineffective erythropoiesis. In particular, people with thalassaemia major develop secondary iron overload resulting from regular red blood cell transfusion. Iron chelation therapy is needed to prevent long-term complications.

Both deferoxamine and deferiprone have been found to be efficacious. However, a systematic review of the effectiveness and safety of the new oral chelator deferasirox in people with thalassaemia is needed.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness and safety of oral deferasirox in people with thalassaemia and secondary iron overload.

Search methods

We searched the Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register. We also searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBMR, Biosis Previews, Web of Science, Derwent Drug File, XTOXLINE and three trial registries: www.controlled-trials.com; www.clinicaltrials.gov; www.who.int./ictrp/en/. Date of the most recent searches of these databases: 24 June 2010.

Date of the most recent search of the Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 03 November 2011.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials comparing deferasirox with no therapy or placebo or with another iron chelating treatment.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information.

Main results

Four studies met the inclusion criteria.

Two studies compared deferasirox to placebo or standard therapy of deferoxamine (n = 47). The placebo-controlled studies, a pharmacokinetic and a dose escalation study, showed that deferasirox leads to net iron excretion in transfusion-dependent thalassaemia patients. In these studies, safety was acceptable and further investigation in phase II and phase III trials was warranted.

Two studies, one phase II study (n = 71) and one phase III study (n = 586) compared deferasirox to standard treatment with deferoxamine. Data suggest that a similar efficacy can be achieved depending on the ratio of doses of deferoxamine and deferasirox being compared; in the phase III trial, similar or superior efficacy for surrogate parameters of ferritin and liver iron concentration could only be achieved in the highly iron-overloaded subgroup at a mean ratio of 1 mg of deferasirox to 1.8 mg of deferoxamine corresponding to a mean dose of 28.2 mg/d and 51.6 mg/d respectively. Data on safety at the presumably required doses for effective chelation therapy are limited. Patient satisfaction was significantly better with deferasirox, while rate of discontinuations was similar for both drugs.

Authors' conclusions

Deferasirox offers an important alternative line of treatment for people with thalassaemia and secondary iron overload. Based on the available data, deferasirox does not seem to be superior to deferoxamine at the usually recommended ratio of 1 mg of deferasirox to 2 mg of deferoxamine. However, similar efficacy seems to be achievable depending on the dose and ratio of deferasirox compared to deferoxamine. Whether this will result in similar efficacy in the long run and will translate to similar benefits as has been shown for deferoxamine, needs to be confirmed. Data on safety, particularly on rare toxicities and long-term safety, are still limited.

Therefore, we think that deferasirox should be offered as an alternative to all patients with thalassaemia who either show intolerance to deferoxamine or poor compliance with deferoxamine. In our opinion, data are still too limited to support the general recommendation of deferasirox as first-line treatment instead of deferoxamine. If a strong preference for deferasirox is expressed, it could be offered as first-line option to individual patients after a detailed discussion of the potential benefits and risks.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Deferasirox for managing transfusional iron overload in people with thalassaemia

Thalassaemia is a hereditary anaemia due to a defect in the production of haemoglobin. Regular red blood cell transfusions are needed, particularly for the severe form of the disease, thalassaemia major. This results in secondary iron overload. Since the human body has no means of actively getting rid of excessive iron, drug treatment (iron chelators) is needed. Several years ago, a new oral iron chelator, deferasirox, was introduced. However, it is not known whether deferasirox offers advantages compared to deferoxamine or deferiprone with regard to effectiveness and safety.

Four studies are included in the review. Two studies comparing deferasirox with placebo showed effectiveness of deferasirox with regard to iron excretion. Two other studies compared deferasirox with standard treatment of deferoxamine. Similar effectiveness seems to be achievable depending of the doses and ratio of the two drugs compared. It needs to be confirmed whether this results in similar improvement of patient-important outcomes in the long run.

The safety of deferasirox was acceptable; however, rarer adverse events or long-term side effects could not be adequately investigated due to the limited number of patients and the short duration of the studies. Patient satisfaction was significantly better with deferasirox, while rate of discontinuations was similar for both drugs.

Deferasirox should be offered as an alternative to all patients who do not tolerate deferoxamine or who have poor compliance with deferoxamine. Ideally, further studies looking at patient-important, long-term outcomes as well as rarer adverse events should be conducted prior to routine recommendation of deferasirox as first line therapy in thalassaemia patients with iron overload.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Déférasirox pour la gestion de la surcharge ferrique chez les personnes atteintes de thalassémie

Contexte

La thalassémie est une anémie héréditaire due à une érythropoïèse inefficace. Les personnes atteintes de thalassémie majeure développent plus particulièrement une surcharge ferrique secondaire en raison de transfusions régulières de globules rouges. Un traitement chélateur du fer doit être administré pour éviter toute complication à long terme.

La déféroxamine et la défériprone se sont révélées efficaces. Toutefois, une revue systématique concernant l'efficacité et la tolérance d'un nouveau traitement chélateur à base de déférasirox oral chez les personnes atteintes de thalassémie devra être réalisée.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité et la tolérance du déférasirox oral chez les personnes atteintes de thalassémie et d'une surcharge ferrique secondaire.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre des essais sur les hémoglobinopathies du groupe Cochrane sur la mucoviscidose et les autres maladies génétiques. Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBMR, Biosis Previews, Web of Science, Derwent Drug File, XTOXLINE et trois registres d'essais : www.controlled-trials.com ; www.clinicaltrials.gov ; www.who.int./ictrp/en/. Date des recherches les plus récentes effectuées dans ces bases de données : 24 juin 2010.

Date des recherches les plus récentes effectuées dans le registre des essais cliniques sur les hémoglobinopathies du groupe Cochrane : 3 novembre 2011.

Critères de sélection

Des essais contrôlés randomisés comparant le déférasirox à l'absence de traitement ou un placebo ou un autre traitement chélateur du fer.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment évalué les risques de biais et extrait des données. Nous avons contacté les auteurs des études afin d'obtenir des informations complémentaires.

Résultats Principaux

Quatre études répondaient aux critères d'inclusion.

Deux études comparaient le déférasirox à un placebo ou un traitement standard à base de déféroxamine (n = 47). Les études contrôlées par placebo, une étude pharmacocinétique et en escalade de dose, montraient que le déférasirox génère une excrétion de fer nette chez les patients atteints de thalassémie transfuso-dépendante. Dans ces études, la tolérance était acceptable et d'autres recherches dans des essais de phase II et III devront être réalisées.

Deux études, une étude de phase II (n = 71) et une étude de phase III (n = 586), comparaient le déférasirox à un traitement standard à base de déféroxamine. Les données suggèrent qu'il est possible d'obtenir une efficacité similaire en fonction des rapports de doses de déféroxamine et de déférasirox comparés ; dans l'essai de phase III, une efficacité similaire ou supérieure des paramètres de substitution de la concentration hépatique en fer et de ferritine peut uniquement être obtenue dans le sous-groupe présentant une surcharge ferrique élevée avec un rapport moyen de 1 mg de déférasirox contre 1,8 mg de déféroxamine, ce qui correspond à une dose moyenne de 28,2 mg/d et 51,6 mg/d, respectivement. Les données relatives à la tolérance aux doses supposées requises pour un traitement chélateur efficace sont limitées. La satisfaction des patients était significativement meilleure avec le déférasirox, alors que les taux d'abandon étaient semblables pour les deux médicaments.

Conclusions des auteurs

Le déférasirox propose un traitement alternatif de première ligne important pour les personnes atteintes de thalassémie et d'une surcharge ferrique secondaire. D'après les données disponibles, le déférasirox ne semble pas être supérieur à la déféroxamine au rapport habituellement recommandé de 1 mg de déférasirox contre 2 mg de déféroxamine. Toutefois, il est possible d'obtenir une efficacité similaire en fonction de la dose et du rapport entre le déférasirox et la déféroxamine. Il devra être confirmé s'il est possible d'obtenir une efficacité similaire à long terme et si les effets bénéfiques générés sont semblables à ceux de la déféroxamine. Les données relatives à la tolérance, plus particulièrement les toxicités rares et la tolérance à long terme, sont toutefois limitées.

Par conséquent, nous pensons que le déférasirox doit être proposé comme traitement alternatif à tous les patients atteints de thalassémie qui ne tolèrent pas la déféroxamine ou qui présentent une tolérance faible à la déféroxamine. Nous pensons que les données sont encore trop insuffisantes pour appuyer la recommandation générale du déférasirox comme traitement de première ligne à la place de la déféroxamine. Si le déférasirox est clairement plébiscité, il peut être proposé aux patients comme option de première ligne suite à une discussion approfondie sur ses effets bénéfiques et risques éventuels.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Déférasirox pour la gestion de la surcharge ferrique chez les personnes atteintes de thalassémie

Déférasirox pour la gestion de la surcharge ferrique transfusionnelle chez les personnes atteintes de thalassémie

La thalassémie est une anémie héréditaire due à une anomalie de la production d'hémoglobine. Des transfusions de globules rouges doivent être régulièrement effectuées, plus particulièrement pour la forme la plus grave de la maladie, la thalassémie majeure, avec comme résultat, une surcharge ferrique secondaire. Étant donné que le corps humain ne peut pas évacuer activement le surplus de fer, un traitement médicamenteux (chélateurs ferriques) doit être administré. Quelques années auparavant, un nouveau chélateur ferrique oral, le déférasirox, faisait son apparition. Toutefois, nous ignorons si le déférasirox offre des avantages en termes d'efficacité et de tolérance par rapport à la déféroxamine ou à la défériprone.

Quatre études sont incluses dans cette revue. Deux études comparant le déférasirox à un placebo montraient l'efficacité du déférasirox en ce qui concerne l'excrétion de fer. Deux autres études comparaient le déférasirox à un traitement standard à base de déféroxamine. L'obtention d'une efficacité similaire semble être possible en fonction des doses et des rapports des deux médicaments comparés. Si cette découverte génère une amélioration similaire des résultats importants pour le patient à long terme, elle doit être confirmée.

La tolérance du déférasirox était acceptable. Toutefois, des événements indésirables plus rares ou des effets secondaires à long terme n'ont pas pu être correctement examinés en raison d'un nombre limité de patients et de la durée trop courte des études. La satisfaction des patients était significativement meilleure avec le déférasirox, alors que les taux d'abandon étaient semblables pour les deux médicaments.

Le déférasirox doit être administré comme traitement alternatif à tous les patients qui ne tolèrent pas la déféroxamine ou qui présentent une tolérance faible à la déféroxamine. Théoriquement, d'autres études examinant des résultats importants pour le patient à long terme, ainsi que des événements indésirables, devront être réalisées avant que le déférasirox soit systématiquement recommandé comme traitement de première ligne des patients atteints de thalassémie présentant une surcharge ferrique.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 24th March, 2014
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français