Intervention Review

Optimal primary surgical treatment for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

  1. Ahmed Elattar1,*,
  2. Andrew Bryant2,
  3. Brett A Winter-Roach3,
  4. Mohamed Hatem4,
  5. Raj Naik5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group

Published Online: 10 AUG 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 30 JUN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007565.pub2


How to Cite

Elattar A, Bryant A, Winter-Roach BA, Hatem M, Naik R. Optimal primary surgical treatment for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD007565. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007565.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    City Hospital & Birmingham Treatment Centre, Birmingham, West Midlands, UK

  2. 2

    Newcastle University, Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

  3. 3

    Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Salford, UK

  4. 4

    Stockton-on-Tees, UK

  5. 5

    Northern Gynaecological Oncology Centre, Gateshead, Tyne and Wear, UK

*Ahmed Elattar, City Hospital & Birmingham Treatment Centre, Dudley Road, Birmingham, West Midlands, B18 7QH, UK. amaattar@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 10 AUG 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Ovarian cancer is the sixth most common cancer among women. In addition to diagnosis and staging, primary surgery is performed to achieve optimal cytoreduction (surgical efforts aimed at removing the bulk of the tumour) as the amount of residual tumour is one of the most important prognostic factors for survival of women with epithelial ovarian cancer. An optimal outcome of cytoreductive surgery remains a subject of controversy to many practising gynae-oncologists. The Gynaecologic Oncology group (GOG) currently defines 'optimal' as having residual tumour nodules each measuring 1 cm or less in maximum diameter, with complete cytoreduction (microscopic disease) being the ideal surgical outcome. Although the size of residual tumour masses after surgery has been shown to be an important prognostic factor for advanced ovarian cancer, it is unclear whether it is the surgical procedure that is directly responsible for the superior outcome that is associated with less residual disease.

Objectives

To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of optimal primary cytoreductive surgery for women with surgically staged advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (stages III and IV).

To assess the impact of various residual tumour sizes, over a range between zero and 2 cm, on overall survival.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3) and the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Review Group Trials Register, MEDLINE and EMBASE (up to August 2010). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field.

Selection criteria

Retrospective data on residual disease from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or prospective and retrospective observational studies which included a multivariate analysis of 100 or more adult women with surgically staged advanced epithelial ovarian cancer and who underwent primary cytoreductive surgery followed by adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy. We only included studies that defined optimal cytoreduction as surgery leading to residual tumours with a maximum diameter of any threshold up to 2 cm.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Where possible, the data were synthesised in a meta-analysis.

Main results

There were no RCTs or prospective non-RCTs identified that were designed to evaluate the effectiveness of surgery when performed as a primary procedure in advanced stage ovarian cancer.

We found 11 retrospective studies that included a multivariate analysis that met our inclusion criteria. Analyses showed the prognostic importance of complete cytoreduction, where the residual disease was microscopic that is no visible disease, as overall (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were significantly prolonged in these groups of women. PFS was not reported in all of the studies but was sufficiently documented to allow firm conclusions to be drawn.

When we compared suboptimal (> 1 cm) versus optimal (< 1 cm) cytoreduction the survival estimates were attenuated but remained statistically significant in favour of the lower volume disease group There was no significant difference in OS and only a borderline difference in PFS when residual disease of > 2 cm and < 2 cm were compared (hazard ratio (HR) 1.65, 95% CI 0.82 to 3.31; and HR 1.27, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.61, P = 0.05 for OS and PFS respectively).

There was a high risk of bias due to the retrospective nature of these studies where, despite statistical adjustment for important prognostic factors, selection bias was still likely to be of particular concern.

Adverse events, quality of life (QoL) and cost-effectiveness were not reported by treatment arm or to a satisfactory level in any of the studies.

Authors' conclusions

During primary surgery for advanced stage epithelial ovarian cancer all attempts should be made to achieve complete cytoreduction. When this is not achievable, the surgical goal should be optimal (< 1 cm) residual disease. Due to the high risk of bias in the current evidence, randomised controlled trials should be performed to determine whether it is the surgical intervention or patient-related and disease-related factors that are associated with the improved survival in these groups of women. The findings of this review that women with residual disease < 1 cm still do better than women with residual disease > 1 cm should prompt the surgical community to retain this category and consider re-defining it as 'near optimal' cytoreduction, reserving the term 'suboptimal' cytoreduction to cases where the residual disease is > 1 cm (optimal/near optimal/suboptimal instead of complete/optimal/suboptimal).

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Clear survival benefit is achieved if all or most (< 1 cm remaining) of the tumour after primary surgical treatment for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer is removed

Ovarian cancer is a cancerous growth arising from different parts of the ovary. It is the sixth most common cancer among women. Most ovarian cancers are classified as epithelial. Ovarian epithelial cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissue covering the ovary and most cases are epithelial. Primary surgery is performed to achieve optimal cytoreduction (surgical efforts aiming at removing the bulk of the tumour) as the amount of tumour that remains after surgery (residual disease) is one of the most important factors that is taken into account when determining a prognosis (prognostic factor) for survival of epithelial ovarian cancer. Optimal cytoreductive surgery remains a subject of controversy to many practising obstetric gynaecologists who specialise in the diagnosis and treatment of women with cancer of the reproductive organs (gynae-oncologists). The Gynaecologic Oncology Group (GOG) currently defines 'optimal' as having a small aggregation of remaining cancer cells after surgery (residual tumour nodules) each measuring 1 cm or less in maximum diameter, with complete cytoreduction (microscopic disease) being the ideal surgical outcome. Although the size of residual tumour masses after surgery has been shown to be an important prognostic factor for advanced ovarian cancer, there is limited evidence to support the conclusion that the surgical procedure is directly responsible for the superior outcome associated with less residual disease. This review assessed overall and progression-free survival of optimal primary cytoreductive surgery for women with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (stages III and IV). We found 11 retrospective studies that included more than 100 women and used a multivariate analysis (used statistical adjustment for important prognostic factors) and met our inclusion criteria. Analyses showed the prognostic importance of complete cytoreduction, where the residual disease is microscopic with no visible disease, as overall (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were significantly prolonged in these groups of women. PFS was not reported in all of the studies but was sufficiently documented to allow firm conclusions to be drawn. When we compared suboptimal (> 1 cm) versus optimal (< 1 cm) cytoreduction the survival estimates were attenuated but remained statistically significant in favour of the lower volume disease group, but there was no significant difference in OS and only a borderline difference in PFS when residual disease of > 2 cm and < 2 cm were compared. There was a high risk of bias due to the retrospective nature of these studies. Adverse events, quality of life (QoL) and cost-effectiveness were not reported by treatment arm or to a satisfactory level in any of the studies. During primary surgery for advanced stage epithelial ovarian cancer, all attempts should be made to achieve complete cytoreduction. When this is not achievable, the surgical goal should be optimal (< 1 cm) residual disease. Due to the high risk of bias in the current evidence, randomised controlled trials should be performed to determine whether it is the surgical intervention or patient-related and disease-related factors that are associated with the improved survival in these groups of women.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Traitement chirurgical primaire optimal pour le cancer épithélial de l'ovaire avancé

Contexte

Le cancer de l'ovaire est le sixième cancer le plus fréquent chez les femmes. En plus du diagnostic et de la stadification, la chirurgie primaire est réalisée afin de parvenir à une cytoréduction optimale (efforts chirurgicaux visant à éliminer la plus grande partie de la tumeur), car le volume de la tumeur résiduelle constitue l'un des facteurs pronostiques les plus importants pour la survie des femmes souffrant d'un cancer épithélial de l'ovaire. Le résultat optimal de la cytoréduction chirurgicale fait encore débat parmi bon nombre de gynécologues-oncologues. Le Gynaecologic Oncology Group (GOG) définit actuellement optimale comme la présence de nodules tumoraux résiduels mesurant pour chacun 1 cm de diamètre maximal ou moins ; la cytoréduction complète (maladie microscopique) étant le résultat chirurgical idéal. Bien qu'il ait été démontré que la taille des masses tumorales résiduelles après la chirurgie est un facteur pronostique important dans le cas du cancer de l'ovaire avancé, on ignore si l'intervention chirurgicale est directement à l'origine du résultat supérieur associé à la diminution de la maladie résiduelle.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité de la cytoréduction chirurgicale primaire optimale pour les femmes souffrant d'un cancer épithélial de l'ovaire avancé avec stadification chirurgicale (stades III et IV).

Évaluer les effets de diverses tailles de tumeur résiduelle, comprises entre zéro et 2 cm, sur la survie globale.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2010, numéro 3) et le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur les cancers gynécologiques, ainsi que dans MEDLINE et EMBASE (jusqu'à août 2010). Nous avons également recherché dans les registres des essais cliniques, les résumés de réunions scientifiques et les listes bibliographiques des études incluses, et contacté des experts dans le domaine.

Critères de sélection

Les données rétrospectives relatives à la maladie résiduelle provenant d'essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) ou d'études observationnelles rétrospectives et prospectives qui comprenaient une analyse multivariée d'au moins 100 femmes adultes souffrant d'un cancer épithélial de l'ovaire avancé avec stadification chirurgicale et ayant subi une cytoréduction chirurgicale primaire suivie d'une chimiothérapie adjuvante à base de platine. Nous n'avons inclus que les études définissant la cytoréduction optimale comme une intervention chirurgicale menant à des tumeurs résiduelles d'un diamètre, en mesurant depuis n'importe quelle extrémité, de 2 cm au maximum.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont, de façon indépendante, extrait les données et évalué les risques de biais. Lorsque cela était possible, les données ont été synthétisées à l'aide d'une méta-analyse.

Résultats Principaux

Nous n'avons identifié aucun ECR ou non-ECR prospectif conçu pour évaluer l'efficacité de la chirurgie réalisée en tant qu'intervention primaire pour le cancer de l'ovaire avancé.

Onze études rétrospectives ont été recensées ; elles comprenaient une analyse multifactorielle et satisfaisaient à nos critères d'inclusion. Les analyses révélaient l'importance pronostique de la cytoréduction complète (lorsque la maladie résiduelle est microscopique, c.à.d. non visible), car la survie globale et la survie sans progression étaient significativement allongées chez ces groupes de femmes. La survie sans progression n'était pas rapportée dans toutes les études mais suffisamment consignée pour tirer des conclusions solides.

En comparant la cytoréduction suboptimale (> 1 cm) avec la cytoréduction optimale (< 1 cm), les estimations de survie étaient réduites mais restaient, sur le plan statistique, significativement favorables au groupe présentant un volume tumoral moindre. Il n'y avait aucune différence significative concernant la survie globale et seulement une faible différence de survie sans progression lorsque la maladie résiduelle supérieure à 2 cm et inférieure à 2 cm étaient comparées (hazard ratio (HR) 1,65, IC à 95 % entre 0,82 et 3,31 ; et HR 1,27, IC à 95 % entre 1,00 et 1,61, P = 0,05 pour la survie globale et la survie sans progression, respectivement).

Il y avait un risque de biais élevé dû à la nature rétrospective de ces études lorsque, malgré l'ajustement statistique par rapport aux facteurs pronostiques importants, le biais de sélection était encore susceptible de constituer une préoccupation particulière.

Dans toutes les études, les événements indésirables, la qualité de vie et l'efficience n'étaient pas rapportés par groupe de traitement, ou à un niveau satisfaisant.

Conclusions des auteurs

Au cours de la chirurgie primaire pour le cancer épithélial de l'ovaire avancé, tous les efforts doivent être faits pour parvenir à une cytoréduction complète. Lorsque cela n'est pas possible, l'objectif chirurgical doit être la maladie résiduelle optimale (< 1 cm). Compte tenu du risque de biais élevé dans les preuves actuelles, des essais contrôlés randomisés devraient être réalisés afin de déterminer si l'amélioration de la survie dans ces groupes de patientes est due à l'intervention chirurgicale ou aux facteurs liés à la maladie et à la patiente. Les conclusions de cette revue, signalant que les femmes présentant une maladie résiduelle inférieure à 1 cm évoluent toujours mieux que les femmes ayant une maladie résiduelle supérieure à 1 cm, devraient inciter la communauté chirurgicale à maintenir cette catégorie et à considérer la possibilité de la redéfinir comme cytoréduction presque optimale, réservant ainsi le terme suboptimale pour les cas où la maladie résiduelle est supérieure à 1 cm (optimale/presque optimale/suboptimale au lieu de complète/optimale/suboptimale).

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Traitement chirurgical primaire optimal pour le cancer épithélial de l'ovaire avancé

En matière de survie, des bénéfices évidents sont obtenus si la totalité ou la plus grande partie (< 1 cm restant) de la tumeur est éliminée après le traitement chirurgical primaire pour le cancer épithélial de l'ovaire avancé.

Le cancer de l'ovaire se caractérise par une tumeur cancéreuse se développant aux dépens de différentes parties de l'ovaire. C'est le sixième cancer le plus fréquent chez les femmes. La plupart des cancers de l'ovaire sont classés parmi les cancers épithéliaux. Le cancer épithélial de l'ovaire est une maladie qui se manifeste par la formation de cellules malignes (cancéreuses) dans le tissu recouvrant l'ovaire et la plupart des cas sont épithéliaux. La chirurgie primaire a pour objectif de parvenir à une cytoréduction optimale (efforts chirurgicaux visant à éliminer la plus grande partie de la tumeur), car la quantité de tumeur encore présente après la chirurgie (maladie résiduelle) constitue l'un des plus importants facteurs pris en considération au moment d'effectuer un pronostic (facteur pronostique) pour la survie associée au cancer épithélial de l'ovaire. Pour de nombreux gynécologues-obstétriciens se spécialisant dans le diagnostic et le traitement des cancers de l'appareil reproducteur féminin ( gynécologues-oncologues), la cytoréduction chirurgicale optimale est sujette à controverses. Le Gynaecologic Oncology Group (GOG) définit actuellement optimale comme la présence d'une petite quantité de cellules cancéreuses, ou nodules tumoraux résiduels, à la suite de la chirurgie, mesurant pour chacun 1 cm de diamètre maximal ou moins ; la cytoréduction complète (maladie microscopique) étant le résultat chirurgical idéal. Bien qu'il ait été démontré que la taille des masses tumorales résiduelles après la chirurgie est un facteur pronostique important dans le cas du cancer de l'ovaire avancé, peu de preuves étayent la conclusion que l'intervention chirurgicale est directement à l'origine du résultat supérieur associé à la diminution de la maladie résiduelle. Cette revue évaluait la survie globale et la survie sans progression associées à la cytoréduction chirurgicale primaire optimale pour les femmes atteintes d'un cancer épithélial de l'ovaire avancé (stade III et IV). Onze études rétrospectives ont été recensées. Portant sur plus de 100 femmes, elles utilisaient une analyse multifactorielle (et un ajustement statistique par rapport aux facteurs pronostiques importants) et satisfaisaient à nos critères d'inclusion. Les analyses révélaient l'importance pronostique de la cytoréduction complète (lorsque la maladie résiduelle est microscopique et non visible), car la survie globale et la survie sans progression étaient significativement allongées chez ces groupes de femmes. La survie sans progression n'était pas rapportée dans toutes les études mais suffisamment consignée pour tirer des conclusions solides. En comparant la cytoréduction suboptimale (> 1 cm) avec la cytoréduction optimale (< 1 cm), les estimations de survie étaient réduites mais restaient, sur le plan statistique, significativement favorables au groupe présentant un volume tumoral moindre. Il n'y avait cependant aucune différence significative concernant la survie globale et seulement une faible différence de survie sans progression lors de la comparaison entre la maladie résiduelle supérieure à 2 cm et inférieure à 2 cm. Il y avait un risque de biais élevé en raison de la nature rétrospective de ces études. Dans toutes les études, les événements indésirables, la qualité de vie et l'efficience n'étaient pas rapportés par groupe de traitement, ou à un niveau satisfaisant. Au cours de la chirurgie primaire pour le cancer épithélial de l'ovaire avancé, tous les efforts doivent être faits pour parvenir à une cytoréduction complète. Lorsque cela n'est pas possible, l'objectif chirurgical doit être la maladie résiduelle optimale (< 1 cm). Compte tenu du risque de biais élevé dans les preuves actuelles, des essais contrôlés randomisés devraient être réalisés afin de déterminer si l'amélioration de la survie dans ces groupes de patientes est due à l'intervention chirurgicale ou aux facteurs liés à la maladie et à la patiente.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 27th March, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux