Intervention Review

Nutritional interventions for liver-transplanted patients

  1. Gero Langer1,*,
  2. Katja Großmann1,
  3. Steffen Fleischer1,
  4. Almuth Berg2,
  5. Dirk Grothues3,
  6. Andreas Wienke4,
  7. Johann Behrens1,
  8. Astrid Fink1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group

Published Online: 15 AUG 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 10 JUL 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007605.pub2


How to Cite

Langer G, Großmann K, Fleischer S, Berg A, Grothues D, Wienke A, Behrens J, Fink A. Nutritional interventions for liver-transplanted patients. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD007605. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007605.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Institute for Health and Nursing Science, German Center for Evidence-based Nursing, Halle/Saale, Germany

  2. 2

    Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Medizinische Fakultät, Halle/Saale, Germany

  3. 3

    University Hospital Regensburg, Klinik und Poliklinik für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Regensburg, Germany

  4. 4

    Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Informatics, Halle (Saale), Germany

*Gero Langer, Institute for Health and Nursing Science, German Center for Evidence-based Nursing, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Magdeburger Strasse 8, Halle/Saale, 06097, Germany. gero.langer@medizin.uni-halle.de.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 15 AUG 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Malnutrition is a common problem for patients waiting for orthotopic liver transplantation and a risk factor for post-transplant morbidity. The decision to initiate enteral or parenteral nutrition, to which patients and at which time, is still debated. The effects of nutritional supplements given before or after liver transplantation, or both, still remains unclear.

Objectives

The aim of this review was to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of enteral and parenteral nutrition as well as oral nutritional supplements administered to patients before and after liver transplantation.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register (March 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 2 of 12, 2012) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (January 1946 to March 2012), EMBASE (January 1974 to March 2012), Science Citation Index Expanded (January 1900 to March 2012), Social Science Citation Index (January 1961 to October 2010), and reference lists of articles. Manufacturers and experts in the field have also been contacted and relevant journals and conference proceedings were handsearched (from 1997 to October 2010).

Selection criteria

Randomised clinical trials of parallel or cross-over design evaluating the beneficial or harmful effects of enteral or parenteral nutrition or oral nutritional supplements for patients before and after liver transplantation were eligible for inclusion.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias of the trials and extracted data. Dichotomous data were reported as odds ratios (OR) and continuous data as mean differences (MD) along with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). Meta-analysis was not possible due to clinical heterogeneity of included interventions.

Main results

Thirteen trials met the inclusion criteria. Four publications did not report outcomes pre-defined in the review protocol, or other clinically relevant outcomes and additional data could not be obtained. Nine trials could provide data for the review. Most of the 13 included trials were small and at high risk of bias. Meta-analyses were not possible due to clinical heterogeneity of the interventions.

No interventions that were likely to be beneficial were identified.

For interventions of unknown effectiveness,

postoperative enteral nutrition compared with postoperative parenteral nutrition seemed to have no beneficial or harmful effects on clinical outcomes. Parenteral nutrition containing protein, fat, carbohydrates, and branched-chain amino acids with or without alanyl-glutamine seemed to have no beneficial effect on the outcomes of one and three years survival when compared with a solution of 5% dextrose and normal saline. Enteral immunonutrition with Supportan® seemed to have no effect on occurrence of immunological rejection when compared with enteral nutrition with Fresubin®.

There is weak evidence that, compared with standard dietary advice, adding a nutritional supplement to usual diet for patients during the waiting time for liver transplantation had an effect on clinical outcomes after liver transplantation. The combination of enteral nutrition plus parenteral nutrition plus glutamine-dipeptide seemed to be beneficial in reducing length of hospital stay after liver transplantation compared with standard parenteral nutrition (mean difference (MD) -12.20 days; 95% CI -20.20 to -4.00). There is weak evidence that the use of parenteral nutrition plus branched-chain amino acids had an effect on clinical outcomes compared with standard parenteral nutrition, but each was beneficial in reducing length of stay in intensive care unit compared to a standard glucose solution (MD -2.40; 95% CI -4.29 to -0.51 and MD -2.20 days; 95% CI -3.79 to -0.61). There is weak evidence that adding omega-3 fish oil to parenteral nutrition reduced the length of hospital stay after liver transplantation (mean difference -7.1 days; 95% CI -13.02 to -1.18) and the length of stay in intensive care unit after liver transplantation (MD -1.9 days; 95% CI -1.9 to -0.22).

For interventions unlikely to be beneficial, there is a significant increased risk in acute rejections in malnourished patients with a history of encephalopathy and treated with the nutritional supplement Ensure® compared with usual diet only (MD 0.70 events per patient; 95% CI 0.08 to 1.32).

Authors' conclusions

We were unable to identify nutritional interventions for liver transplanted patients that seemed to offer convincing benefits. Further randomised clinical trials with low risk of bias and powerful sample sizes are needed.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Nutritional interventions for liver transplanted patients

Poor nutritional status is a common problem in patients waiting for liver transplantation and it is a risk factor for post-transplant morbidity and mortality. Nutritional status can worsen rapidly in the postoperative period due to preoperative malnutrition, the stress of the surgical procedure, immunosuppressive therapy, and in some patients liver or kidney dysfunction or sepsis. Nutritional interventions for people on a waiting list for liver transplantation include nutritional supplements providing additional protein, fat, and carbohydrates as well as liver-adapted formulas also containing branched-chain amino acids. Nutritional interventions after liver transplantation consist of parenteral or enteral nutrition and oral nutritional supplementation during the postoperative phase.

This systematic review of 13 randomised clinical trials found that there is no convincing evidence for beneficial effects of nutritional interventions for liver-transplanted patients. Accordingly, we could not recommend any specific intervention. More research is needed to identify effective nutritional interventions for patients before and after liver transplantation.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions nutritionnelles pour patients transplantés du foie

Contexte

Les personnes en attente d'une transplantation hépatique orthotopique souffrent souvent de malnutrition et cela constitue un facteur de risque de morbidité post-transplantation. La question de savoir s'il faut procéder à une alimentation par voie entérale ou parentérale, à quels patients et à quel moment, est encore débattue. Les effets des suppléments nutritionnels donnés avant ou après une transplantation du foie, ou les deux, ne sont toujours pas clairs.

Objectifs

Le but de cette revue était d'évaluer les effets bénéfiques et nocifs des nutritions entérale et parentérale, ainsi que des suppléments nutritionnels oraux, administrés aux patients avant et après une transplantation hépatique.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre des essais contrôlés du groupe Cochrane sur les affections hépato-biliaires (mars 2012), le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (numéro 2 sur 12, 2012) dans The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (de janvier 1946 à mars 2012), EMBASE (de janvier 1974 à mars 2012), Science Citation Index Expanded (de janvier 1900 à mars 2012), Social Science Citation Index (de janvier 1961 à octobre 2010) et des listes de référence d'articles. Nous avons également contacté des fabricants et des experts dans le domaine et passé au crible manuellement les journaux et actes de conférences pertinents (de 1997 à octobre 2010).

Critères de sélection

Tout essai clinique randomisé en bras parallèles ou en cross-over ayant évalué les effets bénéfiques ou nocifs de la nutrition entérale ou parentérale, ou des suppléments nutritionnels oraux, chez des patients se trouvant avant ou après une transplantation hépatique, était éligible à l'inclusion.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont, de manière indépendante, évalué les risques de biais des études et extrait les données. Les résultats ont été rapportés sous la forme des rapports des cotes (RC) pour les données dichotomiques et des différences moyennes (DM) pour les données continues, avec intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 %. Il n'a pas été possible d'effectuer de méta-analyse en raison de l'hétérogénéité clinique des interventions incluses.

Résultats Principaux

Treize essais remplissaient les critères d'inclusion. Pour quatre publications il n'avait pas été rendu compte des critères de jugement définis dans le protocole de la revue ni d'autres critères cliniquement pertinents, et des données supplémentaires n'ont pas pu être obtenues. Neuf essais ont pu fournir des données pour la revue. La plupart des 13 études incluses étaient de petite taille et à risque élevé de biais. Il n'a pas été possible d'effectuer de méta-analyses en raison de l'hétérogénéité clinique des interventions.

Aucune intervention susceptible d'être bénéfique n'a été identifiée.

Pour les interventions à l'efficacité indéterminée,

la nutrition entérale postopératoire comparée à la nutrition parentérale postopératoire ne semblait pas avoir d'effets bénéfiques ou néfastes sur les résultats cliniques. La nutrition parentérale contenant des protéines, des matières grasses, des glucides et des acides aminés à chaîne ramifiée, avec ou sans alanine-glutamine, ne semblait avoir aucun effet bénéfique sur les résultats de survie à un et trois ans en comparaison avec une solution de dextrose à 5 % et une solution saline normale. En comparaison avec l'alimentation entérale au Fresubin®, l'immunonutrition entérale par Supportan® ne semblait avoir eu aucun effet sur ​​le risque de rejet immunologique.

Il y a certaines indications que, par rapport à des conseils diététiques standard, l'ajout d'un supplément nutritionnel à l'alimentation habituelle des patients durant la période d'attente pour une transplantation du foie avait eu un effet sur ​​les résultats cliniques après la transplantation. La combinaison de la nutrition entérale avec la nutrition parentérale et la glutamine-dipeptide semblait permettre une réduction de la durée d'hospitalisation après la transplantation du foie, en comparaison avec la nutrition parentérale standard (différence moyenne (DM) -12,20 jours ; IC à 95 % -20,20 à -4,00). Il y a certaines indications que l'utilisation de l'alimentation parentérale plus des acides aminés à chaîne ramifiée avait eu un effet sur ​​les résultats cliniques, en comparaison avec la nutrition parentérale standard, mais les deux permettaient de réduire la durée du séjour en unité de soins intensifs en comparaison avec la solution de glucose standard (DM - 2,40 ; IC à 95 % -4,29 à -0,51 et DM -2,20 jours ; IC à 95 % -3,79 à -0,61). Il y a de faibles preuves que l'ajout d'huile de poisson riche en oméga-3 à la nutrition parentérale réduit la durée de séjour à l'hôpital après une transplantation du foie (différence moyenne de -7,1 jours ; IC à 95 % -13,02 à -1,18) ainsi que la durée du séjour en unité de soins intensifs après transplantation du foie (DM -1,9 jours ; IC à 95 % -1,9 à -0,22).

Pour les interventions peu susceptibles d'être bénéfiques, il y a une augmentation significative du risque de rejet aigu chez les patients souffrant de malnutrition avec antécédents d'encéphalopathie et traités avec le supplément nutritionnel Ensure®, par rapport au seul régime alimentaire habituel (DM 0,70 événements par patient ; IC à 95 % 0,08 à 1,32).

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous n'avons pas été en mesure d'identifier d'interventions nutritionnelles pour patients transplantés hépatiques qui aient semblé offrir des avantages convaincants. Des essais cliniques randomisés supplémentaires sont nécessaires, à faibles risques de biais et avec des effectifs conférant une puissance statistique satisfaisante.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions nutritionnelles pour patients transplantés du foie

Interventions nutritionnelles pour patients transplantés du foie

Les personnes en attente d'une transplantation du foie ont souvent un mauvais état nutritionnel et ceci constitue un facteur de risque de morbidité et de mortalité post-transplantation. L'état nutritionnel peut se détériorer rapidement dans la période postopératoire en raison de la malnutrition préopératoire, du stress de l'intervention chirurgicale, du traitement immunosuppresseur et, chez certains patients, d’une dysfonction rénale ou hépatique ou d’une sepsis. Les interventions nutritionnelles pour personnes en attente d'une greffe du foie consistent notamment en des suppléments nutritionnels de protéines, de matières grasses et de glucides ainsi qu'en des formules spécifiques pour le foie contenant des acides aminés à chaîne ramifiée. Les interventions nutritionnelles après greffe du foie consistent en une alimentation par voie parentérale ou entérale et en une supplémentation nutritionnelle orale durant la phase postopératoire.

Cette revue systématique de 13 essais cliniques randomisés a constaté qu'il n'y avait pas de preuve convaincante d'effets bénéfiques des interventions nutritionnelles pour patients transplantés du foie. Nous ne pouvons donc recommander aucune intervention spécifique. Des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour identifier des interventions nutritionnelles efficaces pour les patients se trouvant avant ou après une transplantation du foie.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 13th September, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français