Intervention Review

Interventions for nail psoriasis

  1. Anna Christa Q de Vries1,
  2. Nathalie A Bogaards1,
  3. Lotty Hooft2,
  4. Marieke Velema1,
  5. Marcel Pasch3,
  6. Mark Lebwohl4,
  7. Phyllis I Spuls1,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Skin Group

Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 22 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007633.pub2


How to Cite

de Vries ACQ, Bogaards NA, Hooft L, Velema M, Pasch M, Lebwohl M, Spuls PI. Interventions for nail psoriasis. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD007633. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007633.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Academic Medical Center, Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam, Netherlands

  2. 2

    Academic Medical Center, Dutch Cochrane Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands

  3. 3

    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Dermatology, Nijmegen, Netherlands

  4. 4

    Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, New York, USA

*Phyllis I Spuls, Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam, 1105 AZ, Netherlands. ph.i.spuls@amc.uva.nl.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Psoriasis is a common skin disease that can also involve the nails. All parts of the nail and surrounding structures can become affected. The incidence of nail involvement increases with duration of psoriasis. Although it is difficult to treat psoriatic nails, the condition may respond to therapy.

Objectives

To assess evidence for the efficacy and safety of the treatments for nail psoriasis.

Search methods

We searched the following databases up to March 2012: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), and LILACS (from 1982). We also searched trials databases and checked the reference lists of retrieved studies for further references to relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs).

Selection criteria

All RCTs of any design concerning interventions for nail psoriasis.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed trial risk of bias and extracted the data. We collected adverse effects from the included studies.  

Main results

We included 18 studies involving 1266 participants. We were not able to pool due to the heterogeneity of many of the studies.

Our primary outcomes were 'Global improvement of nail psoriasis as rated by a clinician', 'Improvement of nail psoriasis scores (NAS, NAPSI)', 'Improvement of nail psoriasis in the participant's opinion'. Our secondary outcomes were 'Adverse effects (and serious adverse effects)'; 'Effects on quality of life'; and 'Improvement in nail features, pain score, nail thickness, thickness of subungual hyperkeratosis, number of affected nails, and nail growth'. We assessed short-term (3 to 6 months), medium-term (6 to 12 months), and long-term (> 12 months) treatments separately if possible.

Two systemic biologic studies and three radiotherapy studies reported significant results for our first two primary outcomes. Infliximab 5 mg/kg showed 57.2% nail score improvement versus -4.1% for placebo (P < 0.001); golimumab 50 mg and 100 mg showed 33% and 54% improvement, respectively, versus 0% for placebo (P < 0.001), both after medium-term treatment. Infliximab and golimumab also showed significant results after short-term treatment. From the 3 radiotherapy studies, only the superficial radiotherapy (SRT) study showed 20% versus 0% nail score improvement (P = 0.03) after short-term treatment.

Studies with ciclosporin, methotrexate, and ustekinumab were not significantly better than their respective comparators: etretinate, ciclosporin, and placebo. Nor were studies with topical interventions (5-fluorouracil 1% in Belanyx® lotion, tazarotene 0.1% cream, calcipotriol 50 ug/g, calcipotriol 0.005%) better than their respective comparators: Belanyx® lotion, clobetasol propionate, betamethasone dipropionate with salicylic acid, or betamethasone dipropionate.

Of our secondary outcomes, not all included studies reported adverse events; those that did only reported mild adverse effects, and there were more in studies with systemic interventions. Only one study reported the effect on quality of life, and two studies reported nail improvement only per feature.

Authors' conclusions

Infliximab, golimumab, SRT, grenz rays, and electron beam caused significant nail improvement compared to the comparative treatment. Although the quality of trials was generally poor, this review may have some implications for clinical practice.

Although powerful systemic treatments have been shown to be beneficial, they may have serious adverse effects. So they are not a realistic option for people troubled with nail psoriasis, unless the patient is prescribed these systemic treatments because of cutaneous psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis or the nail psoriasis is severe, refractory to other treatments, or has a major impact on the person's quality of life. Because of their design and timescale, RCTs generally do not pick up serious side-effects. This review reported only mild adverse effects, recorded mainly for systemic treatments. Radiotherapy for psoriasis is not used in common practice. The evidence for the use of topical treatments is inconclusive and of poor quality; however, this does not imply that they do not work.

Future trials need to be rigorous in design, with adequate reporting. Trials should correctly describe the participants' characteristics and diagnostic features, use standard validated nail scores and participant-reported outcomes, be long enough to report efficacy and safety, and include details of effects on nail features.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Treatments for nail psoriasis

Psoriasis is a common chronic skin disease with a prevalence in 2% to 3% of the population, according to European studies. Involvement of the nails occurs in about 50%. Nail psoriasis is difficult to treat, but may respond to some treatments. We aimed to review the efficacy and safety of the treatments used for nail psoriasis.

We included 18 randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs), which involved 1266 participants and were mostly based on a single study per treatment. Ten studies assessed topical treatments, i.e. applied to the surface of the skin (clobetasol, ciclosporin in maize oil, hyaluronic acid with chondroitin sulphates, 5-fluorouracil, a combination of dithranol with salicylic and UVB, tazarotene, and calcipotriol); 5 studies assessed systemic treatments, i.e. taken orally (golimumab, infliximab, ustekinumab, ciclosporin, and methotrexate); and 3 studies assessed radiotherapy (electron beam, grenz ray, and superficial radiotherapy). With regard to other treatments that are used for nail psoriasis, no RCTs had been carried out.

It was not possible to pool and compare the results because the studies were all so different.

In 5 studies, we found significant improvement of nail psoriasis compared to placebo: with infliximab (5 mg/kg), golimumab (50 mg and 100 mg), superficial radiotherapy, electron beam, and grenz rays.

Although powerful systemic treatments have been shown to be beneficial, they may have serious adverse effects. So they are not a realistic option for people troubled with nail psoriasis, unless the patient is a candidate for these systemic treatments because of skin psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Because of their design and timescale, RCTs generally do not pick up serious side-effects. This review reported only mild adverse effects, recorded mainly for systemic treatments.

Radiotherapy for psoriasis is not used in common practice. The evidence for the use of topical treatments is inconclusive and of poor quality; however, this does not imply that they do not work. Topical treatment options could be beneficial and need to be further investigated.

Clinical trials on nail psoriasis need to be rigorous in design, with clear reporting to enable readers to better interpret the results. Trials should accurately describe the participants' characteristics and diagnostic features of nail psoriasis; use standard validated nail scores and patient-reported outcomes; be long enough to report efficacy and safety; and include more details of effects on nail features.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions contre le psoriasis des ongles

Contexte

Le psoriasis est une maladie de peau courante qui peut également toucher les ongles. Toutes les parties de l'ongle, ainsi que les structures environnantes peuvent être affectées. L'incidence du psoriasis des ongles augmente avec la durée du psoriasis. Bien qu'ils soient difficiles à traiter, les ongles psoriasiques peuvent réagir au traitement.

Objectifs

Evaluer les preuves de l'efficacité et de la sécurité des traitements contre le psoriasis des ongles.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données suivantes jusqu'en mars 2012 : le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur la peau, CENTRAL dans The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (à partir de 1946), EMBASE (à partir de 1974) et LILACS (à partir de 1982). Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans des bases de données d'essais et avons vérifié les bibliographies des études obtenues afin de trouver d'autres références à des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) pertinents.

Critères de sélection

Tous les ECR, quel que soit leur plan, concernant les interventions contre le psoriasis des ongles.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont évalué les risques de biais des essais et extrait les données de manière indépendante. Nous avons recueilli les effets indésirables dans les études incluses.  

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 18 études impliquant 1 266 participants. Nous n'avons pas pu combiner les résultats en raison de l'hétérogénéité d'une grande partie des études.

Nos critères de jugement principaux étaient l'« amélioration globale du psoriasis des ongles, telle qu'évaluée par un clinicien », l'« amélioration des scores de psoriasis des ongles (NAS, NAPSI) », l'« amélioration du psoriasis des ongles d'après le participant ». Nos critères de jugement secondaires étaient les « effets indésirables (et les effets indésirables graves) » ; les « effets sur la qualité de vie » ; et l'« amélioration des caractéristiques des ongles, du score de la douleur, de l'épaisseur des ongles, de l'épaisseur de l'hyperkératose sous-unguéale, du nombre d'ongles affectés et de la croissance des ongles ». Nous avons évalué les traitements à court terme (3 à 6 mois), à moyen terme (6 à 12 mois) et à long terme (> 12 mois) séparément lorsque cela était possible.

Deux études biologiques systémiques et trois études de la radiothérapie ont rapporté des résultats significatifs pour nos deux premiers critères de jugement principaux. Infliximab à 5 mg/kg a montré une amélioration du score des ongles de 57,2 % versus -4,1 % pour le placebo (P < 0,001) et golimumab à 50 mg et 100 mg a montré une amélioration de 33 % et 54 %, respectivement, versus 0 % pour le placebo (P < 0,001), dans les deux cas après un traitement à moyen terme. Infliximab et golimumab ont également montré des résultats significatifs après un traitement à court terme. Parmi les 3 études de la radiothérapie, seule l'étude sur la radiothérapie superficielle (RTS) a montré une amélioration du score des ongles de 20 % versus 0 % (P = 0,03) après un traitement à court terme.

Les études avec cyclosporine, méthotrexate et ustekinumab n'ont pas été significativement meilleures que leurs comparateurs respectifs : étrétinate, cyclosporine et placebo. Les études avec les interventions topiques (5-fluorouracile à 1 % dans une lotion Belanyx®, crème de tazarotène à 0,1 %, calcipotriol à 50 ug/g, calcipotriol à 0,005 %) n'ont pas non plus été meilleures que leurs comparateurs respectifs : lotion de Belanyx®, propionate de clobétasol, dipropionate de bétaméthasone avec acide salicylique ou dipropionate de bétaméthasone.

Concernant nos critères de jugement secondaires, toutes les études incluses n'ont pas rapporté les événements indésirables ; certaines n'ont rapporté que les effets indésirables bénins et plus d'événements indésirables ont été rapportés dans les études des interventions systémiques. Une seule étude a rapporté l'effet sur la qualité de vie et deux études ont rapporté l'amélioration des ongles uniquement par caractéristique.

Conclusions des auteurs

Infliximab, golimumab, SRT, rayons de Bucky et faisceau d'électrons ont entraîné une amélioration significative des ongles comparé au traitement comparateur. Bien que la qualité des essais soit généralement médiocre, cette revue peut avoir des implications pour la pratique clinique.

Bien que des traitements systémiques puissants se soient révélés bénéfiques, ils peuvent avoir de graves effets indésirables. Ils ne représentent donc pas une option réaliste pour les personnes atteintes de psoriasis des ongles, sauf si on prescrit ces traitements systémiques au patient en raison d'un psoriasis cutané ou d'une arthrite psoriasique, ou si le psoriasis des ongles est grave, réfractaire aux autres traitements ou s'il a un important impact sur la qualité de vie de la personne. En raison de leur plan et de leur échelle de temps, les ECR ne détectent généralement pas les effets secondaires graves. Cette revue n'a rapporté que les effets indésirables bénins, enregistrés principalement pour les traitements systémiques. La radiothérapie contre le psoriasis n'est pas utilisée dans la pratique courante. Les preuves en faveur de l'usage des traitements topiques ne sont pas concluantes et sont de mauvaise qualité ; cependant, cela ne veut pas dire qu'ils ne fonctionnement pas.

Les futurs essais doivent avoir un plan rigoureux et une notification adéquate. Les essais doivent décrire correctement les caractéristiques des participants et les éléments diagnostiques ; ils doivent utiliser des scores d'ongle standardisés et validés et des critères de jugement rapportés par les participants ; ils doivent être d'une durée suffisante pour rapporter l'efficacité et la sécurité ; et doivent comprendre les détails concernant les effets sur les caractéristiques des ongles.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions contre le psoriasis des ongles

Traitements contre le psoriasis des ongles

Le psoriasis est une maladie de peau chronique courante dont la prévalence est de 2 % à 3 % de la population selon des études européennes. Les ongles sont touchés dans environ 50 % des cas. Le psoriasis des ongles est difficile à traiter, mais peut réagir à certains traitements. Nous avions pour objectif d'examiner l'efficacité et la sécurité des traitements utilisés contre le psoriasis des ongles.

Nous avons inclus 18 essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) qui portaient sur 1 266 participants et étaient principalement fondés sur une seule étude par traitement. Dix études évaluaient des traitements topiques, c'est-à-dire appliqués à la surface de la peau (clobétasol, cyclosporine dans de l'huile de maïs, acide hyaluronique avec sulfates de chondroïtine, 5-fluorouracile, une combinaison de dithranol et d'acide salicylique et UVB, tazarotène et calcipotriol) ; 5 études évaluaient des traitements systémiques, c'est-à-dire pris par voie orale (golimumab, infliximab, ustekinumab, cyclosporine et méthotrexate) ; et 3 études évaluaient la radiothérapie (faisceau d'électrons, rayon de Bucky et radiothérapie superficielle). Concernant les autres traitements qui sont utilisés contre le psoriasis des ongles, aucun ECR n'avait été réalisé.

Il n'a pas été possible de combiner et de comparer les résultats, car les études étaient trop différentes.

Dans 5 études, nous avons découvert une amélioration significative du psoriasis des ongles comparé au placebo : avec infliximab (5 mg/kg), golimumab (50 mg et 100 mg), radiothérapie superficielle, faisceau d'électrons et rayons de Bucky.

Bien que des traitements systémiques puissants se soient révélés bénéfiques, ils peuvent avoir de graves effets indésirables. Ils ne représentent donc pas une option réaliste pour les personnes atteintes de psoriasis des ongles, sauf si le patient est un candidat pour ces traitements systémiques en raison d'un psoriasis de la peau ou d'une arthrite psoriasique. En raison de leur plan et de leur échelle de temps, les ECR ne détectent généralement pas les effets secondaires graves. Cette revue n'a rapporté que les effets indésirables bénins, enregistrés principalement pour les traitements systémiques.

La radiothérapie contre le psoriasis n'est pas utilisée dans la pratique courante. Les preuves en faveur de l'usage des traitements topiques ne sont pas concluantes et sont de mauvaise qualité ; cependant, cela ne veut pas dire qu'ils ne fonctionnement pas. Les options de traitement topique pourraient être bénéfiques et doivent faire l'objet d'études supplémentaires.

Les essais cliniques portant sur le psoriasis des ongles doivent avoir un plan plus rigoureux, une notification claire pour permettre aux lecteurs de mieux interpréter les résultats. Les essais doivent décrire avec exactitude les caractéristiques des participants et les éléments diagnostiques du psoriasis des ongles ; ils doivent utiliser des scores d'ongle standardisés et validés et des critères d'évaluation rapportés par les patients ; ils doivent être d'une durée suffisante pour rapporter l'efficacité et la sécurité ; et doivent comprendre plus de détails concernant les effets sur les caractéristiques des ongles.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 5th February, 2013
Traduction financée par: Minist�re du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Sant� Fran�ais