Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

School-based physical activity programs for promoting physical activity and fitness in children and adolescents aged 6 to 18

  1. Maureen Dobbins*,
  2. Heather Husson,
  3. Kara DeCorby,
  4. Rebecca L LaRocca

Editorial Group: Cochrane Metabolic and Endocrine Disorders Group

Published Online: 28 FEB 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 21 OCT 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007651.pub2


How to Cite

Dobbins M, Husson H, DeCorby K, LaRocca RL. School-based physical activity programs for promoting physical activity and fitness in children and adolescents aged 6 to 18. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD007651. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007651.pub2.

Author Information

  1. McMaster University, School of Nursing, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

*Maureen Dobbins, School of Nursing, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Rm 3N25G, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5, Canada. dobbinsm@mcmaster.ca.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 28 FEB 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 1.9 million deaths worldwide are attributable to physical inactivity and at least 2.6 million deaths are a result of being overweight or obese. In addition, WHO estimates that physical inactivity causes 10% to 16% of cases each of breast cancer, colon, and rectal cancers as well as type 2 diabetes, and 22% of coronary heart disease and the burden of these and other chronic diseases has rapidly increased in recent decades.

Objectives

The purpose of this systematic review was to summarize the evidence of the effectiveness of school-based interventions in promoting physical activity and fitness in children and adolescents.

Search methods

The search strategy included searching several databases to October 2011. In addition, reference lists of included articles and background papers were reviewed for potentially relevant studies, as well as references from relevant Cochrane reviews. Primary authors of included studies were contacted as needed for additional information.

Selection criteria

To be included, the intervention had to be relevant to public health practice (focused on health promotion activities), not conducted by physicians, implemented, facilitated, or promoted by staff in local public health units, implemented in a school setting and aimed at increasing physical activity, included all school-attending children, and be implemented for a minimum of 12 weeks. In addition, the review was limited to randomized controlled trials and those that reported on outcomes for children and adolescents (aged 6 to 18 years). Primary outcomes included: rates of moderate to vigorous physical activity during the school day, time engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity during the school day, and time spent watching television. Secondary outcomes related to physical health status measures including: systolic and diastolic blood pressure, blood cholesterol, body mass index (BMI), maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), and pulse rate.

Data collection and analysis

Standardized tools were used by two independent reviewers to assess each study for relevance and for data extraction. In addition, each study was assessed for risk of bias as specified in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Where discrepancies existed, discussion occurred until consensus was reached. The results were summarized narratively due to wide variations in the populations, interventions evaluated, and outcomes measured.

Main results

In the original review, 13,841 records were identified and screened, 302 studies were assessed for eligibility, and 26 studies were included in the review. There was some evidence that school-based physical activity interventions had a positive impact on four of the nine outcome measures. Specifically positive effects were observed for duration of physical activity, television viewing, VO2 max, and blood cholesterol. Generally, school-based interventions had little effect on physical activity rates, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, BMI, and pulse rate. At a minimum, a combination of printed educational materials and changes to the school curriculum that promote physical activity resulted in positive effects.

In this update, given the addition of three new inclusion criteria (randomized design, all school-attending children invited to participate, minimum 12-week intervention) 12 of the original 26 studies were excluded. In addition, studies published between July 2007 and October 2011 evaluating the effectiveness of school-based physical interventions were identified and if relevant included. In total an additional 2378 titles were screened of which 285 unique studies were deemed potentially relevant. Of those 30 met all relevance criteria and have been included in this update. This update includes 44 studies and represents complete data for 36,593 study participants. Duration of interventions ranged from 12 weeks to six years.

Generally, the majority of studies included in this update, despite being randomized controlled trials, are, at a minimum, at moderate risk of bias. The results therefore must be interpreted with caution. Few changes in outcomes were observed in this update with the exception of blood cholesterol and physical activity rates. For example blood cholesterol was no longer positively impacted upon by school-based physical activity interventions. However, there was some evidence to suggest that school-based physical activity interventions led to an improvement in the proportion of children who engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity during school hours (odds ratio (OR) 2.74, 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.01 to 3.75). Improvements in physical activity rates were not observed in the original review. Children and adolescents exposed to the intervention also spent more time engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity (with results across studies ranging from five to 45 min more), spent less time watching television (results range from five to 60 min less per day), and had improved VO2max (results across studies ranged from 1.6 to 3.7 mL/kg per min). However, the overall conclusions of this update do not differ significantly from those reported in the original review.

Authors' conclusions

The evidence suggests the ongoing implementation of school-based physical activity interventions at this time, given the positive effects on behavior and one physical health status measure. However, given these studies are at a minimum of moderate risk of bias, and the magnitude of effect is generally small, these results should be interpreted cautiously. Additional research on the long-term impact of these interventions is needed.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

School-based physical activity programs for promoting physical activity and fitness in children and adolescents aged 6 to 18

It is estimated that as many at 1.9 million deaths worldwide are attributable to physical inactivity, and that inactivity is a key risk factor in the development of most chronic diseases and cancers. This is alarming particularly because it is known that physical activity patterns track from childhood into adulthood.

There is some evidence to suggest that school-based physical activity interventions are effective in increasing the number of children engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity, as well as how long they spend engaged in these activities. There is also evidence to suggest that these interventions reduce the amount of time spent watching television.

This review included 44 studies that evaluated the impact of school-based interventions focused on increasing physical activity among 36,593 children and adolescents. Participants were between the ages of six and 18 living in Australia, South America, Europe, China, and North America. Duration of interventions ranged from 12 weeks to six years. No two school-based physical activity promotion programs had the same combination of interventions. Furthermore, the duration, frequency, and intensity of interventions varied greatly across studies. Data collection methods for outcomes were reported to be valid and reliable in a little over half of the included studies.

There is some evidence that school-based physical activity interventions are effective in increasing duration of physical activity from five to 45 min more per day, reducing time spent watching television from five to 60 min less per day, and increasing maximal oxygen uptake or aerobic capacity, reflecting physical fitness level of an individual. The evidence also suggests that children exposed to school-based physical activity interventions are approximately three times more likely to engage in moderate to vigorous physical activity during the school day than those not exposed. At a minimum, a combination of printed educational materials and changes to the school curriculum that promote physical activity during school hours result in positive effects for these outcomes. School-based interventions are not effective in increasing physical activity rates among adolescents, or in reducing systolic and diastolic blood pressure, blood cholesterol, body mass index, and pulse rate.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Programmes d'activité physique en milieu scolaire pour promouvoir l'activité physique et l'exercice chez les enfants et les adolescents âgés de 6 à 18 ans

Contexte

L'Organisation Mondiale de la Santé (OMS) estime que 1,9 million de décès dans le monde sont imputables à l'inactivité physique et qu'au moins 2,6 millions décès sont le résultat du surpoids ou de l'obésité. De plus, l'OMS estime que l'inactivité physique cause 10 à 16 % de cancer du sein, du colon et des cancers rectaux ainsi que des diabètes de type II et 22 % des maladies cardiaques coronariennes. Elle pense que le poids de ces maladies et d'autres maladies chroniques a rapidement augmenté ces dernières décennies.

Objectifs

L'objectif de cette revue systématique était de résumer les données relatives à l'efficacité des interventions scolaires pour promouvoir l'activité physique et l'exercice chez les enfants et les adolescents.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

La stratégie de recherche incluait des recherches dans plusieurs bases de données jusqu'en octobre 2011. Les listes bibliographiques des articles inclus et les documents d'information ont également été examinés pour les études potentiellement pertinentes, ainsi que les références des revues Cochrane concernées. Les auteurs principaux des études incluses ont été contactés pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires.

Critères de sélection

Pour être incluse, l'intervention devait être pertinente en termes de pratique de santé publique (ciblée sur les activités de promotion de la santé), ne pas être réalisée par des médecins, être implémentée, facilitée ou promue par des membres d'unités locales de santé publique, être implémentée dans un contexte scolaire et avoir pour objectif d'accroître l'activité physique, inclure tous les enfants scolarisés et être implémentée pendant au moins 12 semaines. De plus, la revue était limitée aux essais contrôlés randomisés et ceux qui rapportaient des critères de jugement pour les enfants et les adolescents (âgés de 6 à 18 ans). Les résultats principaux incluaient : les taux d'activité physique modérée à vigoureuse pendant une journée d'école, le temps passé à pratiquer une activité physique modérée à vigoureuse pendant une journée d'école et le temps passé devant la télévision. Les critères de jugement secondaires liés aux mesures du statut de santé physique incluaient : la pression artérielle systolique et diastolique, le cholestérol, l'indice de masse corporelle (IMC), l'apport maximal en oxygène (VO2max) et le pouls.

Recueil et analyse des données

Les outils standardisés ont été utilisés par deux auteurs indépendants pour évaluer la pertinence de chaque étude et pour extraire les données. De plus, chaque étude a été évaluée pour mesurer le risque de biais comme indiqué dans le Manuel Cochrane des revues systématiques des interventions. Lorsqu'il y avait des divergences, un consensus a été atteint par la discussion. Les résultats ont été résumés de manière narrative en raison des variations importantes dans les populations, les interventions évaluées et les critères mesurés.

Résultats Principaux

Dans la revue d'origine, 13841 dossiers ont été identifiés et filtrés, 302 études ont été évaluées pour estimer leur éligibilité et 26 études ont été incluses dans la revue. Nous avons trouvé des données indiquant que les interventions en faveur de l'activité physique en milieu scolaire avaient un impact positif sur quatre des neuf mesures de critères de jugement. Des effets spécifiquement positifs ont été observés pour la durée de l'activité physique, le temps passé à regarder la télévision, la valeur VO2 max et le cholestérol. Globalement, les interventions en milieu scolaire ont eu peu d'effet sur les taux d'activité physique, la pression artérielle systolique et diastolique, l'IMC et le pouls. Au minimum, une combinaison de supports éducatifs imprimés et des modifications du cursus scolaire qui promeuvent l'activité physique ont eu des effets positifs.

Dans cette mise à jour, au vu de l'ajout de trois nouveaux critères d'inclusion (conception randomisée, tout les enfants scolarisés invités à participer, une intervention durant au minimum 12 semaines), 12 des 26 études d'origine ont été exclues. En plus, les études publiées entre juillet 2007 et octobre 2011 évaluant l'efficacité des interventions physiques en milieu scolaire ont été identifiées et le cas échéant incluses. Au total, 2378 titres supplémentaires ont été filtrés, parmi lesquels 285 études uniques ont été jugées potentiellement pertinentes. Parmi elles, 30 répondaient à l'ensemble des critères de pertinence et ont été incluses dans cette mise à jour. Cette mise à jour comprend 44 études et représente les données complètes de 36593 participants. Les interventions duraient de 12 semaines à 6 ans.

Généralement, la majorité des études incluses dans cette mise à jour, même s'il s'agissait d'essais contrôlés randomisés, sont au minimum des études avec un risque de biais modéré. Les résultats doivent donc être interprétés avec précaution. Peu de changements dans les critères de jugement ont été observés dans cette mise à jour, à l'exception du cholestérol et des taux d'activité physique. Par exemple, le cholestérol n'était plus impacté de manière positive en fonction des interventions d'activité physique en milieu scolaire. Pour autant, il existait des données suggérant que les interventions d'activité physique en milieu scolaire ont conduit à une amélioration de la proportion des enfants impliqués dans une activité physique modérée à vigoureuse pendant les heures de classe (rapport de cotes (OR) 2,74, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 %, 2,01 à 3,75). Aucune amélioration des taux d'activité physique n'a été observée dans la revue d'origine. Les enfants et les adolescents exposés à l'intervention ont également passé plus de temps dans une activité physique modérée à vigoureuse (les résultats entre les études variaient de 5 à 45 minutes en plus), passé moins de temps à regarder la télévision (les résultats variaient de 5 à 60 minutes en moins par jour), et avaient une meilleure valeur VO2max (les résultats variaient de 1,6 à 3,7 mL/kg par minute). Pour autant, les conclusions globales de cette mise à jour ne sont pas significativement différentes de celles mentionnées dans la revue d'origine.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les données suggèrent de poursuivre la mise en œuvre des interventions d'activité physique en milieu scolaire, au vu des effets positifs sur le comportement et d'une mesure sur le statut de santé physique. Toutefois, étant donné que ces études présentent au minimum un risque de biais modéré, et que la magnitude de l'effet est généralement restreinte, ces résultats doivent être interprétés avec précaution. Des recherches complémentaires sur l'impact à long terme de ces interventions sont nécessaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Programmes d'activité physique en milieu scolaire pour promouvoir l'activité physique et l'exercice chez les enfants et les adolescents âgés de 6 à 18 ans

Programmes d'activité physique en milieu scolaire pour promouvoir l'activité physique et l'exercice chez les enfants et les adolescents âgés de 6 à 18 ans

On estime qu'il y a 1,9 millions de décès dans le monde imputables à l'inactivité physique, et que cette inactivité est un facteur de risque important dans le développement de la majorité des maladies chroniques et des cancers. Cela est alarmant en particulier lorsque que l'on sait que les profils d'activité physique perdurent de l'enfance à l'âge adulte.

Des données suggèrent que les interventions d'activité physique en milieu scolaire sont efficaces pour augmenter le nombre d'enfants impliqués dans une activité physique modérée à vigoureuse, ainsi que le temps qu'ils passent dans ces activités. Il existe également des données qui suggèrent que ces interventions réduisent le temps passé devant la télévision.

Cette revue incluait 44 études qui évaluaient l'impact des interventions en milieu scolaire axées sur une activité physique en hausse parmi 36593 enfants et adolescents. Les participants étaient âgés de 6 à 18 ans, ils vivaient en Australie, en Amérique du Sud, en Europe, en Chine et en Amérique du Nord. Les interventions duraient de 12 semaines à 6 ans. Deux programmes de promotion de l'activité physique en milieu scolaire avaient la même combinaison d'interventions. De plus, la durée, la fréquence et l'intensité des interventions variaient énormément entre les études. Les méthodes pour recueillir les données étaient mentionnées comme étant valides et fiables dans un peu plus de la moitié des études incluses.

Il existe des données indiquant que les interventions d'activité physique en milieu scolaire sont efficaces pour augmenter la durée quotidienne de la pratique d'une activité physique de 5 à 45 minutes, réduire de temps passé devant la télévision de 5 à 60 minutes en moins par jour et accroître l'apport en oxygène maximal ou la capacité respiratoire, reflétant le niveau d'exercice physique d'un individu. Les données suggèrent également que les enfants exposés à des interventions d'une activité physique en milieu scolaire sont environ trois fois plus susceptible de pratiquer une activité physique modérée à vigoureuse pendant le temps scolaire que ceux qui n'y sont pas exposés. Au minimum, une combinaison de supports éducatifs imprimés et des modifications du cursus scolaire qui promeuvent l'activité physique pendant les heures de classe entraînent des effets positifs sur ces critères de jugement. Les interventions scolaires ne sont pas efficaces pour accroître les taux d'activité physique chez les adolescents, ou pour réduire la pression artérielle systolique et diastolique, le cholestérol dans le sang, l'indice de masse corporelle et le pouls.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Ministère de la Santé. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada, ministère de la Santé du Québec, Fonds de recherche de Québec-Santé et Institut national d'excellence en santé et en services sociaux.