Intervention Review

Perioperative transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks for analgesia after abdominal surgery

  1. Shona Charlton1,
  2. Allan M Cyna1,*,
  3. Philippa Middleton2,
  4. James D Griffiths3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Group

Published Online: 8 DEC 2010

Assessed as up-to-date: 8 NOV 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007705.pub2

How to Cite

Charlton S, Cyna AM, Middleton P, Griffiths JD. Perioperative transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks for analgesia after abdominal surgery. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2010, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD007705. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007705.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Women's and Children's Hospital, Department of Women's Anaesthesia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

  2. 2

    The University of Adelaide, ARCH: Australian Research Centre for Health of Women and Babies, Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

  3. 3

    Royal Women's Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia, Parkville, Victoria, Australia

*Allan M Cyna, Department of Women's Anaesthesia, Women's and Children's Hospital, 72 King William Road, Adelaide, South Australia, 5006, Australia. allan.cyna@health.sa.gov.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 8 DEC 2010

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié
  7. 摘要

Background

The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a peripheral nerve block which anaesthetises the abdominal wall. The increasing use of TAP block, as a form of pain relief after abdominal surgery warrants evaluation of its effectiveness as an adjunctive technique to routine care and, when compared with other analgesic techniques.

Objectives

To assess effects of TAP blocks (and variants) on postoperative analgesia requirements after abdominal surgery.

Search methods

We searched specialised registers of Cochrane Anaesthesia and Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Review Groups, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL to June 2010.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing TAP block or rectus sheath block with: no TAP or rectus sheath block; placebo; systemic, epidural or any other analgesia.

Data collection and analysis

At least two review authors assessed study eligibility and risk of bias, and extracted data.

Main results

We included eight studies (358 participants), five assessing TAP blocks, three assessing rectus sheath blocks; with moderate risk of bias overall. All studies had a background of general anaesthesia in both arms in most cases.

Compared with no TAP block or saline placebo, TAP block resulted in significantly less postoperative requirement for morphine at 24 hours (mean difference (MD) -21.95 mg, 95% confidence interval (CI) -37.91 to 5.96; five studies, 236 participants) and 48 hours (MD -28.50, 95% CI -38.92 to -18.08; one study of 50 participants) but not at two hours (all random-effects analyses). Pain at rest was significantly reduced in two studies, but not a third.

Only one of three included studies of rectus sheath blocks found a reduction in postoperative analgesic requirements in participants receiving blocks. One study, assessing number of participants who were pain-free after their surgery, found more participants who received a rectus sheath block to be pain-free for up to 10 hours postoperatively. As with TAP blocks, rectus sheath blocks made no apparent impact on nausea and vomiting or sedation scores.

Authors' conclusions

No studies have compared TAP block with other analgesics such as epidural analgesia or local anaesthetic infiltration into the abdominal wound. There is only limited evidence to suggest use of perioperative TAP block reduces opioid consumption and pain scores after abdominal surgery when compared with no intervention or placebo. There is no apparent reduction in postoperative nausea and vomiting or sedation from the small numbers of studies to date. Many relevant studies are currently underway or awaiting publication.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié
  7. 摘要

TAP blocks (nerve blocks) for analgesia after abdominal surgery

Poorly controlled pain after abdominal surgery is associated with a variety of unwanted post-operative consequences, including patient suffering, distress, confusion, chest and heart problems, and prolonged hospital stays. Traditionally, pain relief is provided by: medications injected in to a vein using a 'drip' such as morphine or paracetamol; administering local anaesthetic into the skin around the surgical wound; or by providing epidural pain relief where local anaesthetic and other pain relieving medications are injected through a fine plastic tube into the epidural space of the lower back - numbing the nerves that supply the abdomen. Following surgery, Transversus Abdominis Plane (TAP) block is a relatively new way of anaesthetising nerves which numb the abdomen after surgery in order to help improve patient comfort after their surgery. In the past few years, there has been increasing research and interest describing how TAP blocks are being used for pain relief in both adults and children having abdominal surgical procedures. However, there have not been any systematic reviews evaluating the effectiveness of the TAP block in reducing pain after surgery. We have searched for research investigating the effectiveness of rectus sheath (a similar block to TAP) and TAP blocks in providing pain relief after abdominal surgery. We have included eight studies, with a total of 358 participants in this review, that show some limited evidence that TAP blocks improve pain relief after abdominal surgery. More research is indicated, comparing TAP blocks with other standard methods of pain relief such as, morphine medication, epidural analgesia and local anaesthetic injection into and around the surgical wound. There are many studies currently underway or awaiting publication which assess the effectiveness of the TAP block and compare it with other techniques. We intend to include these studies in an updated version of this review in the near future.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié
  7. 摘要

Antecedentes

Bloqueos perioperatorios del plano del músculo transverso del abdomen (PTA) para la analgesia posterior a la cirugía abdominal

El bloqueo del plano del músculo transverso del abdomen (PTA) es un bloqueo nervioso periférico que anestesia la pared abdominal. El aumento del uso del bloqueo del PTA como una forma de aliviar el dolor posterior a la cirugía abdominal justifica la evaluación de su efectividad como una técnica complementaria de la atención habitual y, en comparación con otras técnicas analgésicas.

Objetivos

Evaluar los efectos de los bloqueos del PTA (y sus variantes) sobre la necesidad de analgesia posoperatoria tras la cirugía abdominal.

Estrategia de búsqueda

Se hicieron búsquedas en los registros especializados del Grupo Cochrane de Anestesia (Cochrane Anaesthesia Group) y del Grupo Cochrane de Dolor, Apoyo y Curas Paliativas (Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Review Group), CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE y CINAHL hasta junio 2010.

Criterios de selección

Se incluyeron ensayos controlados aleatorios (ECA) que comparaban el bloqueo del PTA o el bloqueo de la vaina del músculo recto con: ningún bloqueo del PTA o de la vaina del músculo recto; placebo; analgesia sistémica, epidural o cualquier otra.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Al menos dos autores de la revisión evaluaron la elegibilidad de los estudios, el riesgo de sesgo y extrajeron los datos.

Resultados principales

Se incluyeron ocho estudios (358 participantes), cinco que evaluaron los bloqueos del PTA, tres que evaluaron los bloqueos de la vaina del músculo recto; con riesgo de sesgo moderado en general. Todos los estudios incluyeron la anestesia general como base en ambos brazos en la mayoría de los casos.

En comparación con ningún bloqueo del PTA o placebo con solución salina, el bloqueo del PTA dio lugar a una necesidad posoperatoria significativamente menor de morfina a las 24 horas (diferencia de medias [DM] −21,95 mg; intervalo de confianza [IC] del 95%: −37,91 a 5,96; cinco estudios, 236 participantes) y a las 48 horas (DM −28,50; IC del 95%: −38,92 a −18,08; un estudio de 50 participantes), aunque no a las dos horas (todos los análisis de efectos aleatorios). El dolor en reposo se redujo significativamente en dos estudios, aunque no en un tercero.

Sólo uno de tres estudios incluidos sobre los bloqueos de la vaina del músculo recto encontró una reducción en la necesidad de analgesia posoperatoria en los participantes sometidos al bloqueo. Un estudio, que evaluó el número de participantes sin dolor después de la cirugía, encontró más participantes sometidos al bloqueo de la vaina del músculo recto sin dolor hasta diez horas después de la cirugía. Del mismo modo que los bloqueos del PTA, los bloqueos de la vaina del músculo recto no tuvieron un impacto evidente sobre las puntuaciones de las náuseas y los vómitos o de la sedación.

Conclusiones de los autores

Ningún estudio comparó el bloqueo del PTA con otros analgésicos, como la analgesia epidural o la infiltración de anestesia local en la herida abdominal. Sólo hay pruebas limitadas para sugerir que el uso del bloqueo del PTA perioperatorio reduce el consumo de opiáceos y las puntuaciones del dolor después de la cirugía abdominal en comparación con ninguna intervención o placebo. No hay ninguna reducción evidente de las náuseas y los vómitos o de la sedación posoperatorios a partir del escaso número de estudios hasta la fecha. Muchos estudios relevantes están actualmente en curso o en espera de publicación.

Traducción

Traducción realizada por el Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié
  7. 摘要

Blocs périopératoires dans le plan du muscle transverse de l'abdomen (TAP) pour l'analgésie après une chirurgie abdominale

Contexte

Le bloc dans le plan du muscle transverse de l'abdomen (TAP) est un bloc nerveux périphérique qui anesthésie la paroi abdominale. L'utilisation croissante du bloc TAP pour soulager la douleur après une chirurgie abdominale permet d'évaluer son efficacité en tant que technique complémentaire des soins de routine et par rapport à d'autres techniques analgésiques.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des blocs TAP (et de leurs variantes) sur les besoins en analgésie postopératoire après une chirurgie abdominale.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons consulté les registres spécialisés des groupes de revue Cochrane sur l'anesthésie et sur la douleur et les soins palliatifs, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE et CINAHL jusqu'en juin 2010.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) comparant le bloc TAP ou le bloc du muscle grand droit aux interventions suivantes : pas de bloc TAP ou du muscle grand droit ; un placebo ; une analgésie systémique, épidurale ou autre.

Recueil et analyse des données

Au moins deux auteurs de revue ont évalué l'éligibilité des études et le risque de biais et ont extrait les données.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus huit études (358 participants), dont cinq évaluaient les blocs TAP et trois évaluaient les blocs du muscle grand droit ; avec un risque de biais modéré dans l'ensemble. Toutes les études étaient réalisées suite à une anesthésie générale dans les deux bras (dans la plupart des cas).

Par rapport à l'absence de bloc TAP ou à un placebo consistant en une solution saline, le bloc TAP entraînait une réduction significative des besoins en morphine postopératoire à 24 heures (différence moyenne (DM) de -21,95 mg, intervalle de confiance (IC) de 95 %, entre -37,91 et 5,96 ; cinq études, 236 participants) et à 48 heures (DM de -28,50, IC à 95 %, entre -38,92 et -18,08 ; une étude portant sur 50 participants) mais pas à deux heures (analyses à effets aléatoires). La douleur de décubitus présentait une diminution significative dans deux études mais pas dans une troisième.

Une seule des trois études incluses portant sur les blocs du muscle grand droit rapportait une réduction des besoins analgésiques postopératoires des participants soumis à des blocs. Une étude évaluant le nombre de participants rapportant une absence de douleur après la chirurgie indiquait que les participants ayant été soumis à un bloc du muscle grand droit étaient plus nombreux à rapporter une absence de douleur jusqu'à 10 heures post-opération. Tout comme les blocs TAP, les blocs du muscle grand droit n'avaient aucun impact apparent sur les scores de nausées, vomissements ou sédation.

Conclusions des auteurs

Aucune étude ne comparait le bloc TAP à d'autres analgésiques tels que l'analgésie épidurale ou l'infiltration d'anesthésique local dans la plaie abdominale. Les preuves sont limitées concernant l'efficacité du bloc TAP périopératoire pour réduire la consommation d'opioïdes et les scores de douleur après une chirurgie abdominale par rapport à l'absence d'intervention ou à un placebo. À ce jour, les quelques études existantes ne rapportent pas de réduction apparente des nausées et vomissements postopératoires ou de la sédation. De nombreuses études sur le sujet sont actuellement en cours ou en attente de publication.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié
  7. 摘要

Blocs périopératoires dans le plan du muscle transverse de l'abdomen (TAP) pour l'analgésie après une chirurgie abdominale

Blocs TAP (blocs nerveux) pour l'analgésie après une chirurgie abdominale

La douleur mal contrôlée après une chirurgie abdominale est associée à plusieurs conséquences postopératoires indésirables pour le patient, notamment une souffrance, une détresse, une confusion, des problèmes thoraciques et cardiaques et un séjour prolongé à l'hôpital. Généralement, la douleur est soulagée par : l'injection de médicaments tels que la morphine ou le paracétamol dans une veine via une perfusion ; l'administration d'un anesthésique local dans la peau autour de la plaie chirurgicale ; ou par un soulagement de la douleur par voie épidurale en injectant un anesthésique local et d'autres médicaments analgésiques au moyen d'un tube en plastique fin dans l'espace épidural situé en bas du dos pour endormir les nerfs connectés à l'abdomen. Après la chirurgie, le bloc du plan du muscle transverse de l'abdomen (TAP) est une manière relativement nouvelle d'anesthésier les nerfs pour endormir l'abdomen afin d'améliorer le confort du patient. Depuis quelques années, de nombreuses recherches décrivent la manière dont les blocs TAP sont utilisés pour soulager la douleur chez les adultes et les enfants soumis à une chirurgie abdominale. Aucune revue systématique n'évalue cependant l'efficacité du bloc TAP pour réduire la douleur après une chirurgie. Nous avons consulté les recherches étudiant l'efficacité des blocs du muscle grand droit (un bloc similaire au TAP) et TAP pour soulager la douleur après une chirurgie abdominale. Nous avons inclus huit études portant sur un total de 358 participants et rapportant des preuves limitées de l'efficacité des blocs TAP pour améliorer le soulagement de la douleur après une chirurgie abdominale. D'autres recherches sont nécessaires pour comparer les blocs TAP à d'autres méthodes standard de soulagement de la douleur, telles que le traitement à la morphine, l'analgésie épidurale et l'injection d'un anesthésique local dans et autour de la plaie chirurgicale. De nombreuses études en cours ou en attente de publication évaluent l'efficacité du bloc TAP et le comparent à d'autres techniques. Notre intention est d'inclure ces études lors d'une prochaine mise à jour de cette revue.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st August, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français

 

摘要

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié
  7. 摘要

背景

利用周術期腹橫肌平面(transversus abdominis plane, TAP) 阻滯於腹部手術後鎮痛

腹橫肌平面阻滯是一種會痲痹腹壁的周邊神經阻滯。隨著越來越多人使用腹橫肌平面阻滯作為一種減輕腹部手術後疼痛的形式,有必要去評估其作為常規照護的附屬療法以及相較於其他鎮痛技術的有效性。

目標

評估腹橫肌平面阻滯對於腹部手術之術後鎮痛需求的功效(及差異)。

搜尋策略

我們搜尋了specialised registers of Cochrane Anaesthesia and Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Review Groups, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL 至 2010年六月。

選擇標準

我們涵括了隨機對照試驗(randomised controlled trials, RCTs)來比較腹橫肌平面阻滯或腹直肌阻滯及未做腹橫肌平面阻滯或腹直肌阻滯;安慰劑;系統性,硬膜外或其他任何鎮痛方式。

資料收集與分析

至少有兩位審查作者評估了研究的合格資格以及偏見風險,並提取數據。

主要結論

我們囊括了八項研究(共358位參與者),具有中度風險總體偏差,其中五份研究評估腹橫肌平面阻滯,而另外三份則評估腹直肌阻滯。這些研究中的大多數個案皆進行了雙臂的麻醉。 與未做腹橫肌平面阻滯或生理食鹽水安慰劑相比,腹橫肌平面阻滯顯著降低術後24小時內 (mean difference (MD) −21.95 mg, 95% confidence interval (CI) −37.91 至 5.96; 五份研究共236參與者) 及48小時內 (MD −28.50, 95% CI −38.92 至 −18.08; 一份研究中的50位參與者) 之嗎啡需要量,但未減少術後2小時內之需要量(所有隨機結果分析)。休息時的疼痛在兩份研究中有顯著降低,但在第三份研究中沒有顯著降低。 三份腹直肌阻滯研究中只有一份發現腹直肌阻滯能減輕患者的術後疼痛。此項研究評估參與人數中有多少人在術後沒有疼痛問題,發現較多施行腹直肌阻滯之患者在術後十小時沒有產生疼痛情形。與腹橫肌平面阻滯相比,腹直肌阻滯對於噁心嘔吐或鎮痛評分沒有顯著影響。

作者結論

目前沒有研究比較腹橫肌平面阻滯與其他鎮痛方式如硬膜外鎮痛或腹部傷口之局部滲透性鎮痛。相較於沒有醫療干預或安慰劑介入,只有有限的證據建議使用周術期腹橫肌平面阻滯來減輕腹部手術後之鴉片類藥物用量。迄今從少數研究中仍無研究顯示能顯著減少術後噁心嘔吐或鎮痛情形。許多相關研究正在進行或等待發表當中。

翻譯人

本摘要由李宛臻翻譯。

此翻譯計畫由臺灣國家衛生研究院 (National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan) 統籌。

總結

利用周術期腹橫肌平面阻滯(神經阻滯)於腹部手術後鎮痛。腹部手術後控制不當的疼痛與許多不希望發生的術後相關,包括病人的痛苦、憂傷、困惑、胸腔及心臟問題及住院時間的延長。傳統上,疼痛減輕藉由:使用點滴於靜脈注射如嗎啡(morphine)或撲熱息痛(paracetamol)等藥物;在手術傷口皮膚給予局部麻醉劑;或使用細塑料管注射硬膜下鎮痛藥物如局部鎮痛劑或其他鎮痛劑至下背部使痲痹延伸至腹部的神經。在未來的手術中,腹橫肌平面阻滯將是一個相對較新的方式用以痲痹腹部手術後神經感覺以增加患者術後舒適度。過去幾年來,有越來越多的研究敘述腹橫肌平面阻滯如何被利用在減輕成人或小孩腹部手術後之疼痛。然而,至今沒有任何系統性回顧評斷腹橫肌平面阻滯減輕術後疼痛的成效。我們搜尋了探討腹直肌阻滯(一相似於腹橫肌平面阻滯的阻滯方式)及腹橫肌平面阻滯對於減輕腹部手術後疼痛的研究。這份評論涵括了八份研究,共有358位參與者顯示僅有有限的證據證實腹橫肌平面阻滯能改善腹部手術後的疼痛。較多的研究在比較腹橫肌平面阻滯與其他的標準減輕疼痛之方式如嗎啡、硬膜下鎮痛劑及手術傷口局部麻醉注射。有許多評估腹橫肌平面阻滯成效並比較其與其他方式的研究正在進行中或正等待發表。我們在不久的將來會在這份評論的更新版本中納入這些研究。