Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Withdrawal versus continuation of chronic antipsychotic drugs for behavioural and psychological symptoms in older people with dementia

  1. Tom Declercq1,*,
  2. Mirko Petrovic2,
  3. Majda Azermai3,
  4. Robert Vander Stichele4,
  5. An IM De Sutter1,
  6. Mieke L van Driel5,
  7. Thierry Christiaens1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group

Published Online: 28 MAR 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 6 DEC 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007726.pub2


How to Cite

Declercq T, Petrovic M, Azermai M, Vander Stichele R, De Sutter AIM, van Driel ML, Christiaens T. Withdrawal versus continuation of chronic antipsychotic drugs for behavioural and psychological symptoms in older people with dementia. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD007726. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007726.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Ghent University, Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, Ghent, Belgium

  2. 2

    Ghent University Hospital, Department of Geriatrics, Ghent, Belgium

  3. 3

    Ghent University, Heymans Institute of Pharmacology, Ghent, Belgium

  4. 4

    Heymans Institute of Pharmacology, Ghent, Belgium

  5. 5

    The University of Queensland, Discipline of General Practice, School of Medicine, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

*Tom Declercq, Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, UZ-6K3, Ghent, B-9000, Belgium. tomrw.declercq@ugent.be.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 28 MAR 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Antipsychotic agents are often used to treat neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in dementia, although the literature is sceptical about their long-term use for this indication. Their effectiveness is limited and there is concern about adverse effects, including higher mortality with long-term use. When behavioural strategies have failed and drug therapy is instituted, regular attempts to withdraw these drugs are recommended. Physicians, nurses and families of older people with dementia are often reluctant to try to stop antipsychotics, fearing deterioration of NPS. Strategies to reduce antipsychotic use have been proposed, but a systematic review of interventions aimed at withdrawal of antipsychotic agents in older people with dementia has not yet been performed.

Objectives

To evaluate whether withdrawal of antipsychotic agents is successful in older people with dementia in community or nursing home settings, to list the different strategies for withdrawal of antipsychotic agents in older people with dementia and NPS, and to measure the effects of withdrawal of antipsychotic agents on behaviour.

Search methods

ALOIS, the Specialized Register of the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group (CDCIG), The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, LILACS, clinical trials registries and grey literature sources were searched on 23 November 2012. The search included the following terms: antipsychotic* or neuroleptic* or phenothiazines or butyrophenones or risperidone or olanzapine or haloperidol or prothipendyl or methotrimeprazine or clopenthixol or flupenthixol or clothiapine or metylperon or droperidol or pipamperone or benperidol or bromperidol or fluspirilene or pimozide or penfluridol or sulpiride or veralipride or levosulpiride or sultopride or aripiprazole or clozapine or quetiapine or thioridazine combined with terms such as discontinu* or withdraw* or cessat* or reduce* or reducing or reduct* or taper* or stop*.

ALOIS contains records from all major healthcare databases (The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, LILACS), as well as from many clinical trials registries and grey literature sources.

Selection criteria

Randomised, placebo-controlled trials comparing an antipsychotic withdrawal strategy to continuation of antipsychotics in people with dementia.

Data collection and analysis

Review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion, rated their risk of bias and extracted data.

Main results

We included nine trials with 606 randomised participants. Seven trials were conducted in nursing homes, one trial in an outpatient setting and one in both settings. In these trials, different types of antipsychotics prescribed at different doses were withdrawn. Both abrupt and gradual withdrawal schedules were used. The risk of bias of the included studies was generally low regarding blinding and outcome reporting and unclear for randomisation procedures and recruitment of participants.

There was a wide variety of outcome measures. Our primary efficacy outcomes were success of withdrawal (i.e. remaining in study off antipsychotics) and NPS. Eight of nine trials reported no overall significant difference between groups on the primary outcomes, although in one pilot study of people with psychosis and agitation that had responded to haloperidol, time to relapse was significantly shorter in the discontinuation group (Chi2 = 4.1, P value = 0.04). The ninth trial included people with psychosis or agitation who had responded well to risperidone therapy for four to eight months and reported that discontinuation led to an increased risk of relapse, that is, increase in the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI)-core score of 30% or greater (P value = 0.004, hazard ratio (HR) 1.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09 to 3.45 at four months). The only outcome that could be pooled was the full NPI-score, used in two studies. For this outcome there was no significant difference between people withdrawn from and those continuing on antipsychotics at three months (mean difference (MD) -1.49, 95% CI -5.39 to 2.40). These two studies reported subgroup analyses according to baseline NPI-score (14 or less versus > 14). In one study, those with milder symptoms at baseline were significantly less agitated at three months in the discontinuation group (NPI-agitation, Mann-Whitney U test z = 2.4, P value = 0.018). In both studies, there was evidence of significant behavioural deterioration in people with more severe baseline NPS who were withdrawn from antipsychotics (Chi2 = 6.8; P value = 0.009 for the marked symptom score in one study).

Individual studies did not report significant differences between groups on any other outcome except one trial that found a significant difference in a measure of verbal fluency, favouring discontinuation. Most trials lacked power to detect clinically important differences between groups.

Adverse events were not systematically assessed. In one trial there was a non-significant increase in mortality in people who continued antipsychotic treatment (5% to 8% greater than placebo, depending on the population analysed, measured at 12 months). This trend became significant three years after randomisation, but due to dropout and uncertainty about the use of antipsychotics in this follow-up period this result should be interpreted with caution.

Authors' conclusions

Our findings suggest that many older people with Alzheimer's dementia and NPS can be withdrawn from chronic antipsychotic medication without detrimental effects on their behaviour. It remains uncertain whether withdrawal is beneficial for cognition or psychomotor status, but the results of this review suggest that discontinuation programmes could be incorporated into routine practice. However, two studies of people whose agitation or psychosis had previously responded well to antipsychotic treatment found an increased risk of relapse or shorter time to relapse after discontinuation. Two other studies suggest that people with more severe NPS at baseline could benefit from continuing their antipsychotic medication. In these people, withdrawal might not be recommended.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Withdrawal of chronic antipsychotic drugs for behavioural and psychological symptoms in older people with dementia

People with dementia often have behavioural problems that can be difficult for carers to manage. Antipsychotic drugs are often prescribed to control symptoms and assist with controlling difficult behaviour. Many people with dementia continue to take these drugs over long periods of time. This review investigates whether withdrawal of long-term antipsychotic treatment is feasible in older people with dementia suffering from behavioural symptoms (often called neuropsychiatric symptoms or NPS). These include agitation, aggression, hallucinations, anxiety, apathy, depression, delusions (beliefs that cannot be true), wandering, repeating of words or sounds, and shouting. Nine studies with 606 participants provided data for the review. Most of the participants were residents in nursing homes, but some were outpatients. The studies differed considerably in participants, methods and outcomes so that is was not possible to combine most of the data numerically.

The evidence suggests that older nursing home residents or outpatients with dementia can be withdrawn from long-term antipsychotics without detrimental effects on their behaviour. Caution is required in older nursing home residents with more severe NPS, as two studies suggest these peoples' symptoms might be worse if their antipsychotic medication is withdrawn. Moreover, one study suggested that older people with dementia and psychosis or agitation and a good response to their antipsychotic treatment for several months could relapse after discontinuation of their antipsychotic medication. We do not know if there are beneficial effects of withdrawal on intellectual processes, quality of life or ability to carry out daily tasks, or if the risk of harmful events is reduced by drug withdrawal. One study suggests that older people with dementia who continue to take antipsychotics might die earlier.

We recommend that programmes that aim to withdraw older nursing home residents from long-term antipsychotics should be incorporated into routine clinical practice, especially if the NPS are not severe. More research is needed to identify people for whom withdrawal is not indicated and risk of relapse should be weighed against the risk of adverse events with long-term antipsychotic treatment.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Comparaison entre l'arrêt et la poursuite des médicaments antipsychotiques chroniques dans le traitement des symptômes comportementaux et psychologiques chez les personnes âgées atteintes de démence

Contexte

Les agents antipsychotiques sont souvent utilisés pour traiter les symptômes neuropsychiatriques (SNP) en cas de démence, bien que la littérature scientifique soit sceptique sur leur utilisation à long terme pour cette indication. Leur efficacité est limitée et il existe des inquiétudes quant aux effets indésirables, notamment pour ce qui est de la mortalité supérieure en cas d'utilisation à long terme. Lorsque les stratégies comportementales ont échoué et qu'un traitement médicamenteux est mis en place, des tentatives régulières d'arrêt de ces médicaments sont recommandées. Les médecins, les infirmières et les familles des personnes âgées atteintes de démence sont souvent réticents à essayer d'arrêter les antipsychotiques, par crainte de voir les SNP se détériorer. Des stratégies pour réduire l'utilisation des antipsychotiques ont été proposées, mais une revue systématique des interventions destinées à l'arrêt des agents antipsychotiques chez les personnes âgées atteintes de démence n'a pas encore été réalisée.

Objectifs

Évaluer si l'arrêt des agents antipsychotiques est efficace chez les personnes âgées atteintes de démence vivant en milieu communautaire ou dans des maisons de retraite médicalisées, afin de dresser la liste des différentes stratégies d'arrêt des agents antipsychotiques chez les personnes âgées atteintes de démence et présentant des SNP, et mesurer les effets de l'arrêt des agents antipsychotiques sur leur comportement.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

ALOIS, le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur la démence et l'amélioration cognitive (CDCIG), The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, LILACS, des registres d'essais cliniques et des sources de la littérature grise ont fait l'objet de recherches le 23 novembre 2012. Les recherches incluaient les termes suivants : antipsychotic* ou neuroleptic* ou phenothiazines ou butyrophenones ou risperidone ou olanzapine ou haloperidol ou prothipendyl ou methotrimeprazine ou clopenthixol ou flupenthixol ou clothiapine ou metylperon ou droperidol ou pipamperone ou benperidol ou bromperidol ou fluspirilene ou pimozide ou penfluridol ou sulpiride ou veralipride ou levosulpiride ou sultopride ou aripiprazole ou clozapine ou quetiapine ou thioridazine combinés à des termes tels que discontinu* ou withdraw* ou cessat* ou reduce* ou reducing ou reduct* ou taper* ou stop*.

ALOIS contient des dossiers issus de toutes les bases de données de soins de santé majeures (The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, LILACS), ainsi que de nombreux registres d'essais cliniques et de nombreuses sources de la littérature grise.

Critères de sélection

Essais randomisés contrôlés par placebo comparant une stratégie d'arrêt d'antipsychotiques à la poursuite d'antipsychotiques chez les personnes atteintes de démence.

Recueil et analyse des données

Les auteurs de la revue ont évalué les essais à inclure et leur risque de biais et ont extrait les données de manière indépendante.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus neuf essais portant sur 606 participants randomisés. Sept essais ont été réalisés dans des maisons de retraite médicalisées, un essai sur des patients non hospitalisés et un essai dans ces deux environnements. Dans ces essais, différents types d'antipsychotiques prescrits à différentes doses étaient arrêtés. Des programmes d'arrêt soudain aussi bien que progressif étaient utilisés. Le risque de biais des études incluses était généralement faible pour ce qui est de l'assignation secrète et de la notification des résultats, et incertain pour les procédures de randomisation et le recrutement des participants.

Il y avait un large éventail de mesures de résultats. Nos principaux résultats d'efficacité étaient la réussite de l'arrêt (à savoir restant dans l'étude sans prendre d'antipsychotiques) et les SNP. Huit des neuf essais n'indiquaient aucune différence significative globale entre les groupes pour les résultats principaux, bien que dans une étude pilote portant sur des personnes souffrant de psychose et d'agitation qui avaient répondu à l'halopéridol, le délai avant rechute ait été significativement plus court dans le groupe des participants interrompant le traitement (Chi2 = 4,1, valeur P = 0,04). Le neuvième essai comprenait des personnes souffrant de psychose ou d'agitation qui avaient bien répondu au traitement par rispéridone pendant quatre à huit mois, et indiquait que l'interruption du traitement entraînait une augmentation du risque de rechute, à savoir une augmentation du score à l'Inventaire neuropsychiatrique (INP) supérieur ou égal à 30 % (valeur P = 0,004, hazard ratio (HR) 1,94, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 1,09 à 3,45 à quatre mois). Le seul résultat qui a pu faire l'objet d'une combinaison était le score total à l'INP, utilisé dans deux études. Pour ce résultat, il n'y avait pas de différence significative entre les personnes arrêtant les antipsychotiques et celles poursuivant le traitement à trois mois (différence moyenne (DM) -1,49, IC à 95 % -5,39 à 2,40). Ces deux études présentaient les analyses en sous-groupes en fonction du score initial à l'INP (14 ou moins contre > 14). Dans une étude, les personnes présentant des symptômes plus légers au départ étaient significativement moins agitées à trois mois dans le groupe des participants interrompant le traitement (INP-agitation, test U de Mann-Whitney z = 2,4, valeur P = 0,018). Dans les deux études, il y avait des signes de détérioration comportementale significative chez les personnes arrêtant les antipsychotiques qui présentaient des SNP initiaux plus sévères (Chi2 = 6,8 ; valeur P = 0,009 pour le score de symptôme indiqué dans une étude).

Les études individuelles n'indiquaient de différences significatives entre les groupes pour aucun des autres résultats, à l'exception d'un essai qui indiquait une différence significative de la mesure de la fluidité verbale, en faveur de l'arrêt. La majorité des essais n'étaient pas suffisamment puissants pour détecter les différences cliniquement importantes entre les groupes.

Les événements indésirables n'étaient pas systématiquement évalués. Dans un essai, il y avait une augmentation non significative de la mortalité chez les personnes qui poursuivaient le traitement antipsychotique (de 5 % à 8 % plus élevé que le placebo, en fonction de la population analysée, mesurée à 12 mois). Cette tendance devenait significative trois ans après la randomisation, mais en raison des abandons et de l'incertitude sur l'utilisation des antipsychotiques pendant cette période de suivi, ce résultat doit être interprété avec prudence.

Conclusions des auteurs

Nos résultats semblent indiquer que de nombreuses personnes âgées atteintes de la maladie d'Alzheimer et présentant des SNP peuvent arrêter les antipsychotiques chroniques sans effets néfastes sur leur comportement. On n'est toujours pas certain que l'arrêt soit bénéfique pour la cognition ou le statut psychomoteur, mais les résultats de cette revue laissant entrevoir que les programmes d'interruption pourraient être incorporés dans la pratique courante. Cependant, deux études portant sur des personnes dont l'agitation ou la psychose avait préalablement bien répondu au traitement antipsychotique indiquaient un risque accru de rechute ou un délai avant rechute plus court après une interruption. Deux autres études laissent apparaître que les personnes présentant des SNP initiaux plus sévères pourraient bénéficier de la poursuite de leur traitement antipsychotique. Chez ces personnes, l'arrêt pourrait ne pas être recommandé.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Comparaison entre l'arrêt et la poursuite des médicaments antipsychotiques chroniques dans le traitement des symptômes comportementaux et psychologiques chez les personnes âgées atteintes de démence

Arrêt des médicaments antipsychotiques chroniques dans le traitement des symptômes comportementaux et psychologiques chez les personnes âgées atteintes de démence

Les personnes atteintes de démence présentent souvent des troubles comportementaux qui peuvent être difficiles à gérer pour les soignants. Les médicaments antipsychotiques sont souvent prescrits pour contrôler les symptômes et faciliter le contrôle du comportement difficile. Un grand nombre de personnes atteintes de démence continuent de prendre ces médicaments sur de longues périodes. Cette revue examine si l'arrêt du traitement antipsychotique à long terme est envisageable chez les personnes âgées atteintes de démence souffrant de symptômes comportementaux (souvent appelés symptômes neuropsychiatriques ou SNP). Ces symptômes comprennent l'agitation, l'agressivité, les hallucinations, l'anxiété, l'apathie, la dépression, les délires (croyances infondées), les errements, la répétition de mots ou de sons, et les cris. Neuf études portant sur 606 participants ont fourni des données pour la revue. La plupart des participants résidaient dans des maisons de retraite médicalisées, mais certains étaient des patients non hospitalisés. Les études présentaient des différences considérables en termes de participants, de méthodes et de résultats, de telle sorte qu'il a été impossible de combiner numériquement la majeure partie des données.

Les données semblent indiquer que les résidents des maisons de retraite médicalisées ou les patients non hospitalisés âgés atteints de démence peuvent arrêter les antipsychotiques à long terme sans effets néfastes sur leur comportement. Une certaine prudence est requise chez les résidents des maisons de retraite médicalisées âgés présentant des SNP plus sévères, puisque deux études semblent indiquer que chez ces personnes, les symptômes peuvent s'aggraver si leur traitement antipsychotique est arrêté. Par ailleurs, une étude laissait entrevoir que les personnes âgées atteintes de démence et de psychose ou d'agitation et réagissant bien à leur traitement antipsychotique pendant plusieurs mois pouvaient rechuter après l'arrêt de leur traitement antipsychotique. Nous ignorons s'il existe des effets bénéfiques de l'arrêt sur les processus intellectuels, la qualité de vie ou la capacité de mener à bien les tâches quotidiennes, ou si le risque d'événements néfastes est réduit par l'arrêt du traitement. Une étude semble indiquer que les personnes âgées atteintes de démence qui continuent de prendre des antipsychotiques pourraient décéder plus tôt.

Nous recommandons que les programmes visant à arrêter les antipsychotiques à long terme chez les résidents âgés des maisons de retraite médicalisées soient incorporés dans la pratique clinique courante, en particulier si les SNP ne sont pas sévères. Des recherches supplémentaires doivent être effectuées pour identifier les personnes chez qui l'arrêt est contre-indiqué et si le risque de rechute doit être évalué par rapport au risque d'événements indésirables avec le traitement antipsychotique à long terme.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 22nd March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux pour la France: Minist�re en charge de la Sant�